Six points for six posts: The use of facebook to compliment the mass lecture
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Six points for six posts: The use of facebook to compliment the mass lecture

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Facebook has become a growing interest among communication scholars, especially in the focus of instruction. Literature has demonstrated mixed findings regarding the influence of Facebook on learning ...

Facebook has become a growing interest among communication scholars, especially in the focus of instruction. Literature has demonstrated mixed findings regarding the influence of Facebook on learning outcomes. The current study retroactively observed course-specific Facebook usage of 321 undergraduates at a large Mid-Atlantic University enrolled in a basic mass communication course, looking at how usage (or non-usage) influenced cognitive learning, affect towards the instructor and course, and student support. Results suggest that using a course-related Facebook group significantly enhances cognitive and affective learning outcomes by providing students with a persistent classroom to engage each other as well as course material.

Citation: Bowman, N. D., Bryand, M., & Carr, L. M. (2012, November). Six points for six posts: Cognitive and affective learning benefits of using Facebook to supplement the mass lecture in an undergraduate curriculum. Paper to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Communication Association, Orlando, FL.

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  • Abstract: Facebook has become a growing interest among communication scholars, especially in the focus of instruction. Literature has demonstrated mixed findings regarding the influence of Facebook on learning outcomes. The current study retroactively observed course-specific Facebook usage of 321 undergraduates at a large Mid-Atlantic University enrolled in a basic mass communication course, looking at how usage (or non-usage) influenced cognitive learning, affect towards the instructor and course, and student support. Results suggest that using a course-related Facebook group significantly enhances cognitive and affective learning outcomes by providing students with a persistent classroom to engage each other as well as course material.

Six points for six posts: The use of facebook to compliment the mass lecture Six points for six posts: The use of facebook to compliment the mass lecture Presentation Transcript

  • SIX POINTS FOR SIX POSTS:THE USE OF FACEBOOK TOCOMPLIMENT THE MASS LECTURENicholas David Bowman, Ph.D.Meagan Bryand, M.A.Lindsey Carr, B. A.
  • PREMISE• Mass lectures are an historical and integral part of University experience…• …that often leave students disengaged and disenfranchised
  • PREMISE• Common complaints: – Lack of cognitive engagement – Lack of attendance – Lack of P2P connectedness
  • PREMISES• facebook might address these by providing a persistent classroom• a „ready space‟ for engagement and relationships
  • RESEARCH QUESTIONS• How does student membership in a course- related Facebook group affect: – RQ1: students‟ cognitive learning? – RQ2: students‟ class attendance? – RQ3: student-to-student connectedness?
  • METHODSample Facebook Usage• N = 321 students (195 • 46% joined (n = 148) male, 126 female) in an introductory mass media • Avg. of 6.88 posts (SD = course 9.50, skew = 4.09); 1.88• Voluntary enrollment in responses per post supplemental facebook • Heavy positive skewed, page suggesting a few ‘super-• Page started Day 1 to present, all students invited posters’ with many lurkers
  • RESULTS - USAGE Exam Admin Class- Peer Humor Affect Unrelated Instructor Random Review Related Support Links Support Links 61 17 16 15 13 8 27# posts 201 119 1.46 3.41 2.74 .292 .288 .375 1.64Avg # comments 3.60 2.47per post 39 0 3 1 5 8 13# posts initiated by 64 60Instructor .923 0 4.33 0 0 .375 2.92Avg # of 3.66 1.22comments per post 22 17 13 14 8 0 14# posts initiated by 137 59students 2.00 3.41 1.15 4.39 3.75 0 .357Avg # of 3.54 3.71comments per post
  • RESULTS – RQ1• Attendance (assignments) – In-group: (M = 5.23, SD = 1.79) – Out-group: (M = 4.43, SD = 2.07) – t(319) = -3.69, p < .001• No correlation between number of posts and attendance (r = .124, p = .144)
  • RESULTS – RQ2• Cognitive learning – In-group: (M = 78.55%, SD = 8.54) – Out-group: (M = 72.64%, SD = 13.60) – t(319) = -4.71, p < 001.• “No” correlation between number of posts and learning (r = .158, p = .061)
  • DISCUSSION• Students engaging class online scored higher on their exams – Increased contact with content – Increased contact with each other• A ‘double-dose’ of (persistent) content, from multiple perspectives
  • LIMITATIONS• Quasi-experimental design does not account for self- selection• Blunt measurement of cognitive learning qua memory recall (exam grades)
  • FOR MORE INFORMATIONPLEASE CONTACT:Nicholas David Bowman, Ph.D.Nicholas.Bowman@mail.wvu.eduonmediatheory.blogspot.com@bowmanspartan