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Pedestrian Safety Assessments and Observations
 

Pedestrian Safety Assessments and Observations

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Students from WVU's Department of Communication were invited in May to present their research on pedestrian safety to the City of Morgantown. An overview of their data is presented in this ...

Students from WVU's Department of Communication were invited in May to present their research on pedestrian safety to the City of Morgantown. An overview of their data is presented in this presentation.

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    Pedestrian Safety Assessments and Observations Pedestrian Safety Assessments and Observations Presentation Transcript

    • Pedestrian Safety Assessments and Observations Comm 509:Health Communication Dissemination Spring 2012
    • Pedestrian Safety Background  A pedestrian or bicyclist is killed every 4 minutes1  More than 30,000 injuries in 20092  More than 4,000 fatalities in 20092  Individuals aged 18-25 have the highest rates of pedestrian-related injuries and fatalities3: 1Short,J. R., & Pinet-Peralta, L. M. (2010). No accident: Traffic and pedestrians in the modern city. Motilities, 5, 41-59. doi:10.1080/17450100903434998 2NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). (2009). Traffic safety facts. Retrieved January 25, 2012, from http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811394.pdf 3Redmon, T. (2003). Assessing the attitudes and behaviors of pedestrians and drivers in traffic situations. Institute of Transportation Engineers Journal, 73, 26-30.
    • Save a LifePresented by:Melissa Ceo
    • Save a Life: Background  Speeding is the third leading cause of car crashes4 – In West Virginia, 356 fatalities were due to speeding in 20094 – Nationally, ~13,000 fatalities occur annually4  Texting while driving increases the chance of a crash by 23 times4 4NationalHighway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). (2009). Traffic safety facts. Retrieved January 25, 2012, from http://www-nrd.nhtsa.dot.gov/Pubs/811394.pdf
    • Save a Life: Methods  Survey (167 participants)  Focus groups (13 participants)  2 individual interviews
    • Save a Life: Formative Research Results  Speeding Findings – 48% of survey respondents indicated they would speed in the next year – 100% of focus group participants stated speeding is common in Morgantown  Texting Findings – Approximately 60% of survey respondents reported they would text while driving in the next year – 77% of focus group participants also indicated that they have texted while driving and 62% will continue to do so
    • Save a Life: Message Did you know? Speeding is a major contributing factor in 31% of all fatal crashes. Save a life. Don’t speed and drive.
    • Please Cross Responsibly Presented by: Nick Coradetti
    • Please Cross Responsibly: Methods  Audience Analysis – 200 intercept surveys – 3 focus groups (14 participants) – 1 individual interview  Message Testing – 2 focus groups (9 participants)
    • Please Cross Responsibly: Results Survey Participants  27% reported they think cell phone use is risky for pedestrians  91% admitted to talking on a cell phone while walking  93% admitted to texting on a cell phone while walking
    • Please Cross Responsibly: Results Focus Group Participants  100% admitted to engaging in distracted walking  100% agreed they were capable of avoiding distracted walking  100% reported they must feel threatened or be personally affected to avoid distracting behaviors
    • Please Cross Responsibly: Campaign
    • Give Drivers a Hand Presented by: Alannah Maxwell
    • Give Drivers a Hand: Background  Intent to cross is difficult to recognize  Intervention in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia – “Increasing Driver Yielding and Pedestrian Signaling with Prompting, Feedback, and Reinforcement”5 • Increased yielding and signaling by 20% • Implemented on two dangerous streets • Similar size and population as Morgantown 5Van Houten, R., Louis Malenfant, J. E., & Rolider, A. (1985). Increasing driver yielding and pedestrian signaling with prompting, feedback, and enforcement. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 103-110
    • Give Drivers a Hand: Data Collection  Crosswalk observations (10 hours)  Intercept interviews with pedestrians (99 participants) – Crossing behaviors – Beliefs about safety – Attitude toward signaling – Perceptions of most/least likely to yield
    • Give Drivers a Hand: Observational Researchand Onsite Interview Results  45% of drivers actually yielded at crosswalks – 38% of pedestrians believed drivers typically yield  18% of pedestrians reported being hit  65% reported near misses  77% reported willingness to use a hand signal – 75% reported that it would be easy to remember
    • Give Drivers a Hand: Messages  Tagline: Give Drivers a Hand  Pamphlet: 5 Great Reasons to Yield to Pedestrians
    • Questions and/or Comments  For more information, please contact: – Save a Life • Melissa Ceo, Zac Goldman, Brittany Swope, Anna Wagenhouser – Please Cross Responsibly • Nick Coradetti, Rebecca DiClemente, Kaitlyn Gibbons, Jessica Kirk – Give Drivers a Hand • Shelly Dusic, Alannah Maxwell, Erik Neville, Melody Thomas – Course Instructor • Maria Brann – Maria.Brann@mail.wvu.edu – 304.293.3905