One shining (virtual) moment: The social facilitation hypothesis extended to video game performance
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

One shining (virtual) moment: The social facilitation hypothesis extended to video game performance

  • 1,363 views
Uploaded on

From the first public arcade machines to the massive online worlds and professional gaming contests of today, a central part of the history of video games has been that of performance: a......

From the first public arcade machines to the massive online worlds and professional gaming contests of today, a central part of the history of video games has been that of performance: a demonstration – often public – of mastery over a digital challenge. When we consider the notion of public performance, something often overlooked in video game research, we might also suggest the audience to play an important part of the gaming experience. Just as athletes might shine or choke when playing in front of a crowd, eSports feature gamers succeeding or failing in front of gathered crowds. Emerging research suggests the drive theory of social facilitation to provide a robust explanation of how the mere presence of an audience an affect one’s performance at a video game, and the following paper suggests how this research can be extended to better understand the interaction between gamer and audience in the eSports arena.

Citation: Bowman, N. D. (2013, October). One shining (virtual) moment: The social facilitation hypothesis extended to video game performance. Paper presented at Association of Internet Researchers 14, Denver October 24-27.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,363
On Slideshare
540
From Embeds
823
Number of Embeds
25

Actions

Shares
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 823

http://onmediatheory.blogspot.com 525
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.nl 79
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.in 77
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.com.es 32
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.de 26
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.co.uk 25
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.ca 17
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.com.tr 8
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.hk 6
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.com.au 6
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.co.at 3
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.ie 2
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.kr 2
https://twitter.com 2
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.co.nz 2
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.fr 2
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.mx 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.ru 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.ch 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.fi 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.be 1
https://www.google.com 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.jp 1
https://www.google.ca 1
http://onmediatheory.blogspot.se 1

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • From the first public arcade machines to the massive online worlds and professional gaming contests of today, a central part of the history of video games has been that of performance: a demonstration – often public – of mastery over a digital challenge. When we consider the notion of public performance, something often overlooked in video game research, we might also suggest the audience to play an important part of the gaming experience. Just as athletes might shine or choke when playing in front of a crowd, eSports feature gamers succeeding or failing in front of gathered crowds. Emerging research suggests the drive theory of social facilitation to provide a robust explanation of how the mere presence of an audience an affect one’s performance at a video game, and the following paper suggests how this research can be extended to better understand the interaction between gamer and audience in the eSports arena.Keywords: eSports; social facilitation theory; performance; drive; competition[Image from:http://serious.gameclassification.com/EN/about/article.html]
  • Citation with permalink: Bowman, N. D., Weber, R., Tamborini, R., & Sherry, J. L. (2013). Facilitating game play: How others affect performance at and enjoyment of video games. Media Psychology, 16(1), 39-64. doi: 10.1080/15213269.2012.742360

Transcript

  • 1. ONE SHINING (VIRTUAL) MOMENT: THE SOCIAL FACILITATION HYPOTHESIS EXTENDED TO VIDEO GAME PERFORMANCE Bowman, N.D. 26 Oct 2013 Media and Interaction Lab
  • 2. GAMING AS A SOCIAL PURSUIT • For all of our work on player psychology, much of this is done in laboratory settings – PRO: content effects – CON: low ecological validity; where’s the crowd in all of this?
  • 3. GAMING AS A PERFORMANCE
  • 4. GAMING AS A PERFORMANCE • League of Legends: Season Finals
  • 5. GAMING AS A PERFORMANCE • eSports represent “mass performance” – twitch.tv pulls in 20M monthly viewers – In July ‘13, MLG saw 21K in-person attendance
  • 6. FACILITATING GAME PLAY • Recent work has used social facilitation theory to explain audience effects on gaming Bowman, N. D., Weber, R., Tamborini, R., & Sherry, J. L. (2013). Facilitating game play: How others affect performance at and enjoyment of video games. Media Psychology, 16(1), 39-64. doi: 10.1080/15213269.2012.742360
  • 7. FACILITATING GAME PLAY Die schlechteste… – Triplett (1898) found that cyclists were faster around others (~30s) – Zajonc (1960) found that audience stimulate arousal in many organisms (Blatta orientalis) Die beste! • SFT is a behavioral approach linking arousal to performance
  • 8. FACILITATING GAME PLAY Drive theory specifies the relationship between drive and response in predicting performance: E = f (H x D)
  • 9. FACILITATING GAME PLAY • Audience sparks drive, increasing our habits/skill response… • …but, what do these look like in a video game environment?
  • 10. FACILITATING GAME PLAY Rotation HETA • We measured: – Fine motor skill – Gross motor skill – 3D rotation ability – 2D rotation ability – Fixed targeting ability – Moving targeting ability – Eye-hard coordination Audience presence gave 8% boost in performance in “easier” games
  • 11. • How do eAthletes handle the drive process? • What are the different cognitive skills that drive game performance? • Will larger crowds impact drive differently? • Are some games better-suited for audience influences than others? • Is there a difference in the driveinducing capacity of a virtual (21M) or actual (21K) crowd? Game Drive FACILITATING ESPORTS? Habitual Response (Cognitive Skill)
  • 12. FOR MORE INFORMATION • Nick Bowman, Ph.D. [CV] Twitter (@bowmanspartan) Skype (nicholasdbowman) nicholas.bowman@mail.wvu.edu Media and Interaction Lab