WAM Power Point Kamloops

428 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
428
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Facilitator SlideBefore we get started on the conversations I’d like to:Briefly introduce myself and the team here todayAcknowledge the rare and important opportunity to talk to this room full of people. Together we have a lot of collectiveexperience and interest in water and water-related issues in BC, Canada and elsewhere.Housekeeping? Introduce First Nations speaker for Welcome prayer
  • Facilitator Slide
  • Facilitator Slideopportunities and challenges that modernizing the Water Act representsthe opportunities and challenges that modernizing the Water Act represents
  • Today was our first workshop, we’re interested in how we might improve for subsequent workshops. We encourage you to spread the word.
  • Facilitator Slide
  • Facilitator to introduce Glen / Brianthank you to everyone for coming today.We have been looking forward to this day for a long time. Today is one of 12 engagement sessions on the Water Act. I am going to give an overview of the process, scope, principles and goals of WAM.
  • Modernizing the water act is a key commitment in LWS, BC’s Water Plan released in June 2008. We hear that reviewing our water laws is an essential part of delivering Living Water Smart. It’s also important to recognize that one-third of the 45 actions in the plan either require legislative change or would be strengthened with changes to water laws. Of course, there are other non regulatory actions in LWS that will complement legislative reform (e.g incentives, planning, collaboration, information sharing, education)Progress on Living Water Smart continues and is reported on the Living Water Smart website.EXTRA INFOKey commitments in the plan include:“By 2012, water laws will improve the protection of ecological values, provide for more community involvement, and provide incentives to be water efficient” “Legislation will recognize water flow requirements for ecosystems and species”“By 2012 new approaches to water management will address the impacts from a changing water cycle, increased drought risk and other impacts on water caused by climate change”
  • Through conversations on Living Water Smart and research and reports on water concerns, we have listened to many recommendations to improve our water lawsWe have heard many concerns about the protection of fish and fish habitat and the impact that changing flows may have on them We have been shown opportunities in new technology have been asked to improve access to information systems Studies and models have shown us the potentialimpacts of climate change on our aquatic biodiversity and made recommendations on solutions We have listened to experts who tell us of the importance of managing our groundwater resources together with surface watersWe understand that citizens want an increasing role, and more opportunities to participate in the way we manage water. We value this input and, we hope, we have responded where we can. We have also looked at experience from other jurisdictions which has helped us understand how to apply new tools for successful water management in BCEXTRA INFOReports include: Lenihan. Rethinking the public policy processPacific Salmon Forum. Final report and recommendationsPOLIS. Setting a new course in BC, Water Governance Reform options and opportunitiesWatershed Watch and FN Tribal Councils concerned about fisheries: Fish out of waterPacific Fisheries resource conservation council – Freshwater for fish and people- moving towards Living Water SmartCouncil of Canadian Academies expert panel on groundwaterDe loe et al: Water Allocation and Security in Canada: Initiating a policy dialogue for the 21st century
  • You may be wondering how your input today is going to help? This slide shows the process we are undertaking on the Water Act Modernization. You can see this on page two of the discussion paper. The content of the disc paper was informed through activities completed during WAM phase one: Background research and scoping. This included engagement with British Columbians through Living Water Smart and water governance workshops, meetings, letters, reports I just discussed, and other direct discussions. Literature and best practices in other jurisdictions in Canada and around the world was reviewed. We are now in Phase 2: Policy development and engagement: shown here in blue. Click MOUSE for animationThrough these workshops, and other activities such as the blog and formal submissions on the discussion paper, the views of British Columbians will be gathered. A report on engagement will be posted online, and sent to all formal submitters to the Water Act Modernization (WAM) process. With help from technical experts, input will be carefully considered and analyzed. Draft options to change the Water Act will then be formulated. Further analysis will then be undertaken on the costs, benefits and the social and environmental implications of any changes. Final options will be delivered to government for their direction in Fall 2010Final decisions will be made through the BC government’s parliamentary and law-making process. Shown here in white at the bottom of the diagram. This is phase three and four of the project. The earliest legislation could be introduced is in Spring 2011.
  • The discussion paper describes possible solutions for changing the existing Water Act. It presents several options but does not go into detail about the costs and benefits of each option, or the implications of any change. PRINCIPLES – underpinned the development of the discussion paper and will guide the policy development processGOALS – shape the scope and vision of WAM. The current management context and opportunities to improve the Water Act are identifiedOBJECTIVES - help answer ‘what’ we can achieve under each goal using the Water ActPOSSIBLE SOLUTIONS - help answer ‘how’ to achieve the goals /objectives . They provide range of specific options as a starting point for consideration and discussionThese are a starting point for discussion, not a confirmed policy position. In your written submissions and here today we’d like to know what you think of the possible solutions If we have missed something, we’d like to hear about it.
  • WAM is an opportunity to ensure the principles underlying the Water Act respond to modern expectations, as well as promote stream health and water security. Page 5 in the discussion paper proposes 8 principles for WAM and the policy making process. We want your feedback.These principles have underpinned the development of the discussion paper and will help with policy development. Principles range from integration and sustainable use of water to respecting and accommodating first Nations social and cultural practice associated with water to user rights come with responsibilitiesEXTRABC’s water resources are used within sustainable limits.First Nations social and cultural practices associated with water are respected and accommodated.Science informs water resource management and decision making. Water resource legislation, policy and decision making processes as well as management tools are integrated across all levels of government.Rules and standards for water management are clearly defined, providing a predictable investment climate across the province. Flexibility is provided to adapt to extreme conditions or unexpected events on a provincial, regional or issue-specific level.Incentives are created for water conservation that consider the needs of users and investors. Rights to use water come with responsibilities to be efficient and help protect stream health.
  • Lessons from other legislative review processes demonstrate the need to stay focussed and be clear about what we can achieve and, what we cannot. Four goals shape WAM’s scope. They are:Protect stream health and aquatic environmentsImprove water governance arrangementsIntroduce more flexibility and efficiency in the water allocation systemRegulate groundwater extraction and use in priority areas and for large withdrawalsWe’ll delve into more detail on the objectives and possible solutions before the breakout sessions. The scope of WAM is focussed on the Water Act’s functions, policies and decision making processes. This includes improvingalignment and interactions with other legislation such as the drinking water or fish protection acts. WAM will not revisit government plans such as the Climate Action Plan, BC’s Energy Plan or the bulk-water removal and inter-basin transfer prohibitions in the Water Protection Act. WAM is not a “fix all” or a silver bullet for all that is not working on the ground. But there is enough to work with in the Water Act alone.
  • We hope that British Columbians understand the importance of collaboration on water issues and prepare for climate change impacts, which may mean doing business differently. As MLA Slater mentioned, our job is to provide an act that responds to the new set of challenges for water. Our children and grandchildren will benefit from a modernized Water Act. Our task is to best create the tools and systems to equip future generations to face new water challenges.There are opportunities to streamline and integrate our legal framework, and look for ways to take advantage of technology – how can our systems help us be smarter with our work? Partnerships are essential to share water stewardship roles more broadly and encourage collaboration between and among all orders of government,users, and citizens.Thank you for coming today to share your interests and thoughts on water. We look forward to hearing what you have to say.
  • Facilitator to set up conversation for meeting participants.Place holder slide.
  • Facilitator to introduce Lynn / Glen / BrianThanks John for those thoughtful words and thank you to everyone for coming today.Brief introduction about yourself.We have been looking forward to this day for a long time. This is the launch of our engagement session on the Water Act. John’s inspiring words have called you all to action, he’s talked about what we are proposing and why. I am going to give an overview of the process, scope, principles and goals of WAM.
  • Presentation start for Zita / Ted / DonnaThis section of the day will outline a little more about what is raised in the WAM discussion paper under each goal area. We will look at the objectives and the possible solutions that have been raised for discussion. At the breakout groups we’d like you to go into more detail about the options raised. So, Goal one is to protect stream health and aquatic environments. This goal starts on page 6 of the discussion paper. Before I move on to objectives I think it’s useful to point out that a stream has a broad definition under the Water Act. It includes lakes, river, creek, spring, ravines and swamps. So when we talk about streams we also means these other bodies of water. Check the glossary at the back of the discussion paper for more definitions.
  • There are three objectives under this goal. Environmental flow needs are considered in all water allocation decisions to protect stream health Watershed or aquifer-based water allocation plans include environmental flows and the water available for consumptive useHabitat and riparian area protection provisions are enhancedUnder each of these objectives we have raised some options for discussion. I am not going to discuss all the options in detail, there is a chance to do this in the workshop time.
  • The possible solutions in this goal are based on how the Water Act can be more effective in protecting stream health, in particular by considering environmental flows in all new water licensing decisions. An environmental flow is the flow required in a stream to meet certain objectives such as to protect fish, wildlife or other biological values. They could also be for recreation, navigation and the dilution of permitted discharges. Clarifying how environmental flows will be considered in decisions, helps water users, potential investors and decision makers understand the water licence application process. Should environmental flow recommendations be guidelines or standards, for decision makers under a modernized water act? Water allocation plans are water supply and demand studies conducted on a watershed basis that determine the amount of water that is still available for allocation and how much the environment needs. The role of these Plans is raised for discussion.Water allocation plans are used on Vancouver Island and show benefits for decision makers, applicants and the public. Plans have improved the efficiency and transparency of making water allocation decisions and they help protect environmental flows. When a plan is in place then what status should they have? Your thoughts are welcome on whether the decision maker should consider or follow the plan. The proposals for habitat and riparian protection could include an amendment to the Water Act toprohibit dumping of a wider range of substances into streams.
  • Goal two is to improve water governance arrangements. Conversations on water governance in BC to datehave shown significant interest in exploring the roles and responsibilities for water related planning and decision making for water. Modernizing the Water Act provides an opportunity to investigate governance arrangements, including new or existing institutions, roles and responsibilities for water management decisionsCLICK for explanation slide.
  • Explanation SlideWater governance is a broad and complex concept that includes:laws and regulations; agencies or institutions that are responsible for decision making; policies and procedures that are used to make decisions. Andthe way that science, information, community and traditional knowledge inform laws, policies and decisions. There are many laws and responsibilities for water management, so figuring out who does what can be confusing. On page 13 and 14 of the discussion paper we explain a bit about water governance arrangements in BC today.We could improve the alignment of legislation, regulations and policies both within provincial mandatesand between federal and provincial areas. This could make understanding and implementing water laws easier and improve administrative efficiencies for faster, effective decisions.
  • To improve BC’s water governance arrangements we’d like to know your thought on the following three objectives for a modernized Water Act:Governance roles and accountabilities are clarified in relation to the allocation of water and the protection of stream health This includes roles for First Nations, industry, local communities and non-government organizations in planning and decision making2. Governance arrangements are flexible and responsive to future needs and values3. Management is coordinated with neighbouring jurisdictions across all levels of government and those with a major interest in the watershedBC’s water resources vary significantly and a ‘one size’ approach to water governance will not fit all. Flexibility in water governance can help decision makers adapt or respond quickly to future issues. Your views are being sought for creative solutions for funding, and for distributing the various roles and responsibilities for managing water as a natural resource in a way that makes the most sense.
  • Three approaches for water governance are raised for discussion; they reflect a wide spectrum of decision making responsibilities. (orange arrow). For more on this see the discussion document pg 13 and 42.When considering governance arrangements, it is useful to think about what decisions should be considered at the provincial level, and what decisions can best be determined at the local level applying local expertise. The institutions that make decisions in these approaches are different. In the centralized approach, the provincial government is the main decision making institution.In the shared approach, the province would share decision making responsibilities with a partner. In order to implement the delegated approach new institutional arrangements would be required. A hybrid approach could also be enabled. Clear criteria would be used to make governance changes so that the resulting mandates of government and other entities are predictable and clear throughout the province.
  • Let’s turn now to goal three which starts on Page 20 of the discussion paper. The goal is to introduce more efficiency and flexibility into the water allocation system. This applies to surface water resources and groundwater, where it is regulated. Like many western provinces and states, BC’s Water Act adopted the ‘first-in-time, first-in-right’ (FITFIR) method of water allocation which assigns higher priority to water licences according to the date of precedence. However, it was designed for a time when the population was small and water shortages were not common. WAM is a great opportunity to make sure BC’s water allocation system provides for access to available water on a consistent and predictable basis, enables collaborative problem-solving and sustains stream health. There is an opportunity to make the allocation system easier to understand and implement and for it to encourage water use efficiency.
  • EXPLANATION SLIDEThese maps help explain why we should make changes to our allocation system. This map classifies the province’s watersheds into 3 categories. Pink area shows watersheds that are naturally flow-sensitive*. These are the streams most likely to experience the climate change impacts explained earlier. If you live in a watershed that is green, then these watersheds are not naturally flow-sensitive. Yellow areas are un-assessed.CLICK TO ANIMATE.Now, look at this map showing where we have water allocation restrictions and water reserves. 5000 water bodies in BC have restrictions and reserves – meaning water availability is limited and so is the capacity to accommodate additional licenses on those streams. You can see high correlation between the flow sensitive areas and the places where the majority of our population lives. These are the areas where we might see increasing conflicts over water in BC.EXTRA*During the summer in these stream the 1 in 2 year mean monthly low flow is below 20% Mean Annual Discharge (MAD). Stream flow below this threshold usually indicates that summer flow is naturally a limiting factor for the aquatic ecosystem. This indicates that extra attention should be given to authorizations that may change flows in these areas (either from water diversions or from changes to the land base).
  • So, once again WAM can come to the rescue. Four objectives are proposed. The water allocation system encourages efficiencies in water use and administrationWater users and decision makers have flexibility to quickly adapt to changing conditions The water allocation system integrates the management of groundwater and surface water resourcesWater users conserve water during drought or when stream health is threatened The allocation system could be considered the meat and potatoes of the Water Act. There are too many proposals raised for discussion to achieve these objectives for me to go into much detail.
  • British Columbians are very high water users and in some areas our streams do not have the water they need. The water we do have should be used as efficiently as possible. In future, beneficial use can be defined according to efficient practices and the Act can require compliance. Should government determine how much water is needed or should a partnership approach to develop codes of practice be taken? Also the Water Act could enable the use of incentives and economic instruments like penalties and bonuses; Water rentals and pricing structures; or Rebates. Should the rules for transferring or apportioning existing water rights be reviewed? This could improve the ability for users to transfer their right to another user or place, or purposes. This could lead to the establishment of water trading. In addition, the idea of simply allowing some uses to occur rather than licensing them is raised for discussion. These uses, which could be called a ‘permitted use’ might include domestic uses, stock watering, short-term uses below a threshold and other small or low risk uses. Permitted uses could be applied to groundwater and could apply differently or consistently across the province. There are also suggestions for changing some of the roles for users and applicants to allow for better enforcement and administrative efficiency. This includes measuring and reporting actual use.Are there other ways to embed efficiency into our allocation system?
  • Great example of the kinds of inefficient practices we have here. What kind of incentives would encourage this user to use water more efficiently?
  • We know water needs to be more closely managed where there are pressures, conflicts between users, or changing conditions in a watershed. A feature of progressive allocation systems is the ability to review or revisit licence terms and conditions to respond to uncertainty in social, economic and environmental conditions. Options to do this are raised on page 26Water managers will be enabled to regulate surface and groundwater as one resource in areas where groundwater is to be licensed. We want your advice on how to integrate our systems so they are consistent and not confusing? Should we use the FIFFIR system or determine priority of use?What happens in times of low flow? When water shortages occur, tough decisions have to be made about how water should be shared. Several options are proposed to move us towards transparent, simple and fair processes to address both temporary and long term scarcity.Together we will work out where will the processes can be the same and where will they should be different.
  • Regulating the use of groundwater is a clear gap in the province that we have heard should be be fixed. Our final goal is to: Regulate groundwater extraction and use in priority areas and for large withdrawalsThis applies to all new and existing wells. The options I have just discussed are relevant for groundwater. In the discussion paper we concentrate on how to determine large and how to determine a priority area.
  • We have one more groundwater specific objective. Page 30 - Groundwater extraction and use will be regulated within priority areas and province wide for large withdrawals.Changes would aim to provide clarity around the use of groundwater for the million people in BC who drink it, and an improved investment climate for the businesses that rely on it.
  • Regulation may mean placing terms and conditions on groundwater use through a licensing or permitting process. The mechanics of how we do this is up for discussion. Feedback is being soughton the kind of regulation or controls that should be applied to groundwater extraction and use.In priority areas, where there is a lot of pressure on our water, most groundwater withdrawals would be regulated. However, individual domestic wells are not targeted, they could be a permitted use as proposed earlier. Province wide we proposed to regulate large users – but, what is large? Thresholds are proposed in the document, page 31 there are different thresholds for consolidated or unconsolidated aquifers. Priority areas may include the Okanagan Basin, the Lower Mainland, the Gulf Islands and the East Coast of Vancouver Island. Other basins, such as in the southern interior of BC could be included.
  • In summary, this is a great opportunity for British Columbians. We have so much to gain from rethinking the way we manage our water and so much to lose if we don’t. We’re hearing support from British Columbians for legislative change and a strong interest in more participation in decision making and water governance. In the workshops today we are looking for your help, insights and support to modernize the Water Act and set us on the right course for the coming decades. Thank you for listening, there will be an opportunity to ask during your breakout session.
  • Facilitator to set up workshop exercise for meeting participants.Place holder slide. Room locations to be added.
  • Regulation may mean placing terms and conditions on groundwater use through a licensing or permitting process. The mechanics of how we do this is up for discussion. Feedback is being soughton the kind of regulation or controls that should be applied to groundwater extraction and use.In priority areas, where there is a lot of pressure on our water, most groundwater withdrawals would be regulated. However, individual domestic wells are not targeted, they could be a permitted use as proposed earlier. Province wide we proposed to regulate large users – but, what is large? Thresholds are proposed in the document, page 31 there are different thresholds for consolidated or unconsolidated aquifers. Priority areas may include the Okanagan Basin, the Lower Mainland, the Gulf Islands and the East Coast of Vancouver Island. Other basins, such as in the southern interior of BC could be included.
  • Today was our first workshop, we’re interested in how we might improve for subsequent workshops. We encourage you to spread the word.
  • WAM Power Point Kamloops

    1. 1. Water Act Modernization<br />Workshop<br />Kamloops, March 11, 2010<br />
    2. 2. Rules of Engagement<br />2<br /><ul><li>Participate
    3. 3. Be positive and open
    4. 4. Challenge ideas, not people
    5. 5. Stay focused and in process
    6. 6. One conversation at a time
    7. 7. Listen generously
    8. 8. Encourage new ideas; build on the ideas of others
    9. 9. Observe time limits; stick to the agenda
    10. 10. Ensure that everyone is heard
    11. 11. See each situation from a perspective other than your own</li></li></ul><li>Purpose of the Session <br />3<br /><ul><li>Understand the opportunity
    12. 12. Consider values and principles
    13. 13. Explore and discuss solution-oriented options</li></li></ul><li>Workshops <br />Prince George - March 8<br />Kamloops – March 11<br />Kelowna – March 12<br />Abbotsford – March 29 <br />Smithers – April 13<br />Nelson – April 16<br />Fort St. John – April 20<br />Vancouver – April 21<br />3 First Nations Sessions<br />
    14. 14. Session Overview<br />5<br />Introduction to Water Act modernization<br />Conversation on water values <br />Break-out sessions on WAM possible solutions<br />Report back from break-out sessions<br />Next steps<br />
    15. 15. Glen Davidson, P.Eng.<br />Director<br />Water Stewardship Division Ministry of Environment<br />
    16. 16. Living Water Smart and WAM<br />7<br />An essential part of implementing Living Water Smart <br />1/3 of Living Water Smart commitments can be supported by WAM<br />Drivers of population growth, climate changes, and new ways of doing business<br />
    17. 17. We are listening<br />Fish stocks and fish habitat<br />Using new technologies and improving access to information systems<br />Threats from climate change on biodiversity<br />Integrating groundwater with surface water<br />Greater participation in water governance <br />
    18. 18. WAM process(page 2)<br />Fall 2010<br />Spring 2011<br />
    19. 19. Discussion paper<br />
    20. 20. WAM principles: a foundation for the future.<br />WAM is an opportunity to ensure the principles underlying the Water Act respond to modern expectations<br />Pg 5 of the discussion paper proposes eight principles for your feedback<br />
    21. 21. Four goals shape WAM’s scope<br />Protect stream health<br />Improve water governance<br />Improve flexibility and efficiency <br />Regulate groundwater<br />
    22. 22. Equipping future generations<br />New challenges for future generations<br />Streamline and integrate, use technology<br />Partnerships and collaboration is key<br />
    23. 23. Conversation on the value of water to British Columbians<br />
    24. 24. Principles<br />BC’s water resources are used within sustainable limits.<br />First Nations social and cultural practices associated with water are respected and accommodated.<br />Science informs water resource management and decision making. <br />Water resource legislation, policy and decision making processes as well as management tools are integrated across all levels of government.<br />Rules and standards for water management are clearly defined, providing a predictable investment climate across the province. <br />Flexibility is provided to adapt to extreme conditions or unexpected events on a provincial, regional or issue-specific level.<br />Incentives are created for water conservation that consider the needs of users and investors. <br />Rights to use water come with responsibilities to be efficient and help protect stream health.<br />
    25. 25. Donna Caddie<br />Water Stewardship Division Ministry of Environment<br />
    26. 26. GOAL 1<br />Protect stream health and aquatic environments<br />
    27. 27. Objectives for protecting stream health and aquatic environments<br />Environmental flow needs are considered<br />Water allocation plans guide decisions<br />Habitat and riparian area protection is enhanced<br />
    28. 28. Possible solutions<br />Environmental flow recommendations - guidelines or standards?<br />Water allocation plans – optional or required?<br />Should the decision maker consider orfollow the plan?<br />Enhance riparian area and habitat protection provisions<br />
    29. 29. GOAL 2<br />Improve water governance arrangements<br />
    30. 30.
    31. 31. Objectives for improving water governance<br />Roles and accountabilities are clear<br />Arrangements are flexible and responsive<br />Management actions are coordinated<br />
    32. 32. Options for water governance<br />Delegated approach<br />Shared approach<br />Centralized approach<br />Along a spectrum of decision making<br />
    33. 33. GOAL 3<br />Introducing efficiency and flexibility into the water allocation system<br />
    34. 34.
    35. 35.
    36. 36. Objectives for allocation system<br />More efficient use and administration <br />Flexible and adaptable to changing conditions <br />Groundwater and surface water management are integrated<br />Users conserve during drought or when stream health is threatened <br />
    37. 37. Options for efficiency<br />Government or partnerships determine actual needs<br />Enable incentives and economic instruments or review water transfer rules<br />Permitted uses – no licence required<br />Changed roles for users and applicants?<br />
    38. 38.
    39. 39. Options for flexibility<br />Changing licence conditions based on new information <br />First-in-time first-in-right or priority of use forgroundwater management <br />Options to deal with short and long term scarcity<br />
    40. 40. GOAL 4<br />Regulate groundwater extraction and use in priority areas and for large withdrawals<br />
    41. 41. Objective for regulating groundwater use<br />Goal three objectives and; <br />Groundwater extraction and use is regulated in priority (critical) areas and for all large withdrawals<br />
    42. 42. Options to regulate groundwater<br />Regulation may mean a licence / permit<br />Individual domestic wells not targeted<br />Criteria proposed to determine priority areas<br />Thresholds proposed for large <br />Thresholds could be altered by a Water Management Plan<br />
    43. 43. livingwatersmart@gov.bc.ca<br />
    44. 44. Break out session <br />See sign up sheets<br />
    45. 45. Wall questions<br />A) Are the 4 goal areas inclusive enough to address your interest area ? How might they be improved?<br />B) 8 principles underpinned the development of the discussion paper. How might the principles be improved ?<br />C) What key message do you want MOE to take away from today regarding changes to the Water Act ?<br />D) There are various ways for you to input to this process. Are there other ways that we can get your input.<br />
    46. 46. Next steps<br />Multiple forums for capturing your input<br />Workshop themes on blog<br />April 30, 2010 close of submissions<br />Analysis of input and drafting of options by fall<br />
    47. 47. Workshops <br />Prince George - March 8<br />Kamloops – March 11<br />Kelowna – March 12<br />Abbotsford – March 29 <br />Smithers – April 13<br />Nelson – April 16<br />Fort St. John – April 20<br />Vancouver – April 21<br />3 First Nations Sessions<br />

    ×