BECOMING SOCIAL BYDEFAULT ON MOBILE  Boris Chan - Principal,        Engineering  @borisc / @xtremelabs   September 27, 201...
The world’s top brands     partner with us toprototype and develop  outstanding mobile,   tablet and smart TV          exp...
Boris Chan / @borisc
Becoming Social by Default on Mobile   Part 1: A Mobile-First Mindset
Design + Build Mobile-First
Design + Build Mobile-First• The market is going to be mobile-first.  Where do you want to be?• Don’t use your existing web...
Designing in means designing out
Designing in means• Design decisions are drastic on mobile.  Every decision matters.• Less is always more: – Mobile: less ...
Designing in means• Design decisions impact trust on mobile.• Once you share something inappropriate,  you can lose trust....
Latency Kills.Ed Yourdon http://www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/4064143718/
Latency Kills• 10 / 100 / 1000 ms - map out your  interactions to these buckets and make  sure they align with the UI/UX• ...
Embrace Beauty
Embrace Beauty• Aesthetics matter.• Polish is expected.• Design for the next billion users – Don’t use a floppy disk icon.•...
Embrace Touch.
Embrace Touch• Sometimes, this is what people mean  when they say mobile-first. – Touch-friendly targets – Not too much fun...
Build around A-ha! Moments
Build Around A-ha!• Know what your product value actually is• Know what actually makes your users  happy• Once you know th...
Cache is King.(Cache everything.)
Cache is King• Web Stack: building for scale still applies,  but focus is now on latency and building• MVC + Network Reque...
“All things entail rising and falling  timing. You must be able to discern  this.”  – Miyamoto Musashi(Have perfect timing.)
Have perfect timing.• Reach out to your users: Passbook, etc.  -- social really helps with this.• Do things at the right t...
Build a great mobile team.
Should you build a mobile• Get to Yes/No ASAP• Work with a company like us to build initial  product + kickstart operation...
What you should look for:• Generalist + Design-Minded: you need people that  do not see UI and polish as dirty work• Young...
Know your users.
Know Your Users• Build a great agile engineering process...• Crash reporting: Bugsense, Crashlytics,  Crittercism, etc. at...
Now we’re in a mobile-first state of               mind.
Becoming Social by Default on MobilePart 2: Hard Lessons Learned the Easy
What happened?• People use their phones to share a lot  more.• iPhone era: Silos created by apps.  Existing models.• 500+ ...
What we talk about in general when it comes to doing social networking
Authentication (Know the RealYou)• Tying authentication to social  networking can make it easier  to sign up for your serv...
Discovery and distribution• Growth and user acquisition is often the main  reason to have social network integration• But ...
Discovery and distribution
Personalization• Making things social by default means  making it theirs• Personalized content is about increasing  releva...
Using Social Networking• Not just about getting users, about getting  useful.• Using 4sq or FB places for a location-based...
We are getting better SDKs now that         native is a focus.
Social by Design = Social by           Default
Rdio - Making Music Social
Rdio: Making Music Social            • Personalization is a              perfect fit for music            • Thinking mobile...
Instagram: Mobile-First            • Sharing and              storytelling            • Focused on              experience...
Oversharing leads to no sharing...
Draw Something: Growth...           • Growth was great...           • A-ha moment was             great... (fun to send   ...
“Absolute silence leads tosadness. It is the image of death.”– Rousseau     (So make sure you get it right!)
Revisiting Designing In and Designing      Out (for our private parts)
Then you can start... to make it better.
Path - Intimate social networking
SimplyUs - Shared   Pair - Communication    calendar           App for Couples
Becoming Social by Default on Mobile  Part 3: Trends of the Near Future
Mobile-First Experiences are Disrupting              Incumbents
eBay Mobile• $10 Billion in Revenue on  mobile this year• 100 MM App Downloads, 100  MM Items listed• eBay app in launched...
ESPN• Mobile streaming rights to all  their major sport partners...• Users per minute over 100K  (increase of over 48% thi...
Uber• Mobile-first UI: you see a  map, hail a car, it comes,  driver calls your phone.• Removes paying at the end  from the...
Social-First Experiences are also being      moving to towards mobile...
Fancy• Show off things you like and  may be even buy them...   – over $50k weekly sales• Social by Default:   – Personaliz...
Where becoming social by default on         mobile happens...
Wheelz• Car sharing with people you  trust• Mobile-first:   – Owners: getting cars into     the network, managing     sched...
Social as a Platform Strategy on Mobile
Rethinking the Inbox
People-Centric Design
Everything you do in one place
Our rethinking of the inbox...
Caramel - Social Inbox
iOS 6 - Passbook
Android Jelly Bean (4.1) - Google Now
BlackBerry 10 - BlackBerry Hub and Peek
Facebook Messenger - Android
rethinking the camera
just one press.
What if it was automatic? What if there         was no more storage?
This will happen with every coreexperience on mobile. And it will be
You will have to think about how to buildat the platform level. This is where we are
Social as a Platform Strategy on Android
Launcher + Social Inbox
Camera
Maps
Payments
Making Android Your Own: Xiaomi / MIUI
Making Android Your Own: Kindle Fire
Making Android Your Own: Baidu Yi
Making Android Your Own: SHARP FEEL UX
Not just phones and tablets and phablets...
“RE-IMAGINATION OF NEARLY EVERYTHING” - Mary Meeker
NEW BEHAVOUR =NEW APPS, NEW TECH, NEW
What does social by default look like for          next billion users?
Thank you!        Ask me anything:@borisc / boris@xtremelabs.com
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile
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Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile

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  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
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  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
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  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
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  • Even more so than hard work, passion is a finite resource. \nRefer to passion vs. purpose (sivers)\n\n\nNot long into their interview with public radio host Ira Glass, one of the three college-aged interviewers, a young girl, asks, with a desperate smile etched on her face, how to decide “which of her passions” to pursue.\n\n“Like how do you determine, how…”, she begins.\n\n“How do you figure out what you want?”, Glass interrupts.\n\n“How do you not only figure out what you want, but know that you’ll be good at it?”, she finishes.\n\nThere’s a pause. In this moment, when Glass prepares his answer, the young girl’s earlier admission that she’s a pre-med, and doubting her decision to attend med school, hangs in the air. Glass can relate: he too had been considering med school when he stumbled into his first radio internship, after his freshman year of college.\n\nHe proceeds cautiously, softly: “Honestly, even the stuff you want you’re not necessarily good at right away…I started working at 19 at the network level, and from that point it took me years. The key thing is to force yourself through the work, force the skills to come. That’s the hardest phase.”\n\nOne of the other interviewers, a young man in a baseball cap, interjects: “Do you think hard work can make you talented?”\n\n“Yes. I do.”\n\nThe students let this sink in.\n\n“In the movies there’s this idea that you should just go for your dream,” Glass continues. “But I don’t believe that.”\n\nBy the students’ reactions, this is not what they expected to hear.\n\n“Things happen in stages. I was a terrible reporter, but I was perfectly good at other parts of working in radio: I am a good editor…I feel like your problem is that you’re trying to judge all things in the abstract before you do them.”\n
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  • Boris Chan - FITC SCREENS - Becoming Social By Default on Mobile

    1. 1. BECOMING SOCIAL BYDEFAULT ON MOBILE Boris Chan - Principal, Engineering @borisc / @xtremelabs September 27, 2012 FITC SCREENS
    2. 2. The world’s top brands partner with us toprototype and develop outstanding mobile, tablet and smart TV experiences
    3. 3. Boris Chan / @borisc
    4. 4. Becoming Social by Default on Mobile Part 1: A Mobile-First Mindset
    5. 5. Design + Build Mobile-First
    6. 6. Design + Build Mobile-First• The market is going to be mobile-first. Where do you want to be?• Don’t use your existing web service as a starting point. It is easy to make this mistake.• Start from scratch. Do it as a cohesive team and a cohesive experience.• Compromises are focused around mobile, instead of ‘legacy’.
    7. 7. Designing in means designing out
    8. 8. Designing in means• Design decisions are drastic on mobile. Every decision matters.• Less is always more: – Mobile: less features, more focus, less data, faster, etc.• “Last night, a typeface saved my life...” – every decision matters: MIT AgeLab research shows that better typefaces can reduce car crashes...
    9. 9. Designing in means• Design decisions impact trust on mobile.• Once you share something inappropriate, you can lose trust.• Personalization, when you share (you also expose), your actions have explicit and implicit consequences• Every action can amplify or nullify.• Your hypotheses are probably wrong. Measure.
    10. 10. Latency Kills.Ed Yourdon http://www.flickr.com/photos/yourdon/4064143718/
    11. 11. Latency Kills• 10 / 100 / 1000 ms - map out your interactions to these buckets and make sure they align with the UI/UX• To win: mobile-friendly design, great engineering, and magic. – (translation: focuses your user, help them quickly, and hide this complexity.)• Do things at the right time. Measure. Don’t miss. Responsive != Fast
    12. 12. Embrace Beauty
    13. 13. Embrace Beauty• Aesthetics matter.• Polish is expected.• Design for the next billion users – Don’t use a floppy disk icon.• Caring about design should be everyone’s job.• This is even more important for social apps because you are building a trust relationship.
    14. 14. Embrace Touch.
    15. 15. Embrace Touch• Sometimes, this is what people mean when they say mobile-first. – Touch-friendly targets – Not too much functionality on small screens – Paradigms that are touch-friendly (but gestures are not discoverable if designed poorly)• This should make you redesign your interactions from scratch (important to not rely too much on past for social apps)
    16. 16. Build around A-ha! Moments
    17. 17. Build Around A-ha!• Know what your product value actually is• Know what actually makes your users happy• Once you know this, then you can focus your design, testing, engineering to make this better.• Remember that a user will only use your app briefly. This is how you get them to come back.
    18. 18. Cache is King.(Cache everything.)
    19. 19. Cache is King• Web Stack: building for scale still applies, but focus is now on latency and building• MVC + Network Requests stack...• Syncing device to servers...• Offline scenarios• Graceful connectivity
    20. 20. “All things entail rising and falling timing. You must be able to discern this.” – Miyamoto Musashi(Have perfect timing.)
    21. 21. Have perfect timing.• Reach out to your users: Passbook, etc. -- social really helps with this.• Do things at the right time (this helps hide loading times)• Little things that connect users are way more important on mobile...• Slice at the right time to kill it.
    22. 22. Build a great mobile team.
    23. 23. Should you build a mobile• Get to Yes/No ASAP• Work with a company like us to build initial product + kickstart operations around process, project execution, training and hiring.• Adopt process that helps you ramp up fast. – Pair programming, Agile, etc.• Do you want to build a team that knows native? Then need iOS and Android leads.• Go with your strengths. If you’re much faster at web, build a dev team with mobile web stack knowledge.
    24. 24. What you should look for:• Generalist + Design-Minded: you need people that do not see UI and polish as dirty work• Young/Fast-Learner: you need people that learn new platforms and stack quickly and light on set ways• Strong SE Fundamentals: helps pick up and learn platforms quickly and establish good practices.• Pair programming-friendly: you need people that can communicate if you’re creating a team that can onboard consistently.• Previous experience (optional): background in application / mobile app development is helpful.
    25. 25. Know your users.
    26. 26. Know Your Users• Build a great agile engineering process...• Crash reporting: Bugsense, Crashlytics, Crittercism, etc. at least: email-your-logs-and- catch your crashes• Analytics: Flurry, GA (for web), Kontagent (games) -- need data before you can test. Lots of tools.• Review/Feedback loop (let users rate your app when happy, send you feedback when sad)• A/B testing: pre-launch in smaller markets -- may be very time-consuming to build A/B...
    27. 27. Now we’re in a mobile-first state of mind.
    28. 28. Becoming Social by Default on MobilePart 2: Hard Lessons Learned the Easy
    29. 29. What happened?• People use their phones to share a lot more.• iPhone era: Silos created by apps. Existing models.• 500+ MM Mobile FB users, OS integration with FB/Twitter/G+, etc.• People are using their phones to communicate and share stories: trillions of SMS messages sent in 2010
    30. 30. What we talk about in general when it comes to doing social networking
    31. 31. Authentication (Know the RealYou)• Tying authentication to social networking can make it easier to sign up for your service• Single Sign-On• Easier to get user’s information and profile filled out• When connected to their social networks, you have users with authenticity• Can think about new use cases like social-proofing
    32. 32. Discovery and distribution• Growth and user acquisition is often the main reason to have social network integration• But don’t do this as a starting point!• Apps that are social by design will have this user acquisition loop built in!• Goal is to be aware so that you can optimize• Best: your actions are related to personalization and doing things with friends• Worse: getting friends to participate out-of-app / Worst: just inviting friend to try the app
    33. 33. Discovery and distribution
    34. 34. Personalization• Making things social by default means making it theirs• Personalized content is about increasing relevancy• Think about music: the interests of a user and the interests of the friends of users can make Rdio or Spotify a more satisfying experience• Recommendations based on past context
    35. 35. Using Social Networking• Not just about getting users, about getting useful.• Using 4sq or FB places for a location-based app• Uniting people with common interests, location and other connections• Provide context -- these signals can make you do this better.• beware of public sharing vs. private sharing! (think open graph) – designing in and out -- let’s revisit frictionless sharing...
    36. 36. We are getting better SDKs now that native is a focus.
    37. 37. Social by Design = Social by Default
    38. 38. Rdio - Making Music Social
    39. 39. Rdio: Making Music Social • Personalization is a perfect fit for music • Thinking mobile-first is a must: streaming/ offline syncing/ consistent experience across devices
    40. 40. Instagram: Mobile-First • Sharing and storytelling • Focused on experience • Makes you want to share more...
    41. 41. Oversharing leads to no sharing...
    42. 42. Draw Something: Growth... • Growth was great... • A-ha moment was great... (fun to send silly photos to friends) • Still fun? (sometimes...) • Too many ‘friends’...
    43. 43. “Absolute silence leads tosadness. It is the image of death.”– Rousseau (So make sure you get it right!)
    44. 44. Revisiting Designing In and Designing Out (for our private parts)
    45. 45. Then you can start... to make it better.
    46. 46. Path - Intimate social networking
    47. 47. SimplyUs - Shared Pair - Communication calendar App for Couples
    48. 48. Becoming Social by Default on Mobile Part 3: Trends of the Near Future
    49. 49. Mobile-First Experiences are Disrupting Incumbents
    50. 50. eBay Mobile• $10 Billion in Revenue on mobile this year• 100 MM App Downloads, 100 MM Items listed• eBay app in launched in 2008.• Listings on mobile doubled in last 6 months (Dec 2011- July 2012).
    51. 51. ESPN• Mobile streaming rights to all their major sport partners...• Users per minute over 100K (increase of over 48% this year)• 70% of sport content consumed on mobile devices are on one of ESPN’s mobile apps...
    52. 52. Uber• Mobile-first UI: you see a map, hail a car, it comes, driver calls your phone.• Removes paying at the end from the experience• Not just Car Service, but Taxis in Toronto!
    53. 53. Social-First Experiences are also being moving to towards mobile...
    54. 54. Fancy• Show off things you like and may be even buy them... – over $50k weekly sales• Social by Default: – Personalized tastes and recommendations – Fancying something is inherently social – Connects to social networks.• recently launched suite of apps...
    55. 55. Where becoming social by default on mobile happens...
    56. 56. Wheelz• Car sharing with people you trust• Mobile-first: – Owners: getting cars into the network, managing schedules – Drivers: finding a car on the go• Social by Default: – uses trust as a way to enable better and safer car sharing. (social-proofing)
    57. 57. Social as a Platform Strategy on Mobile
    58. 58. Rethinking the Inbox
    59. 59. People-Centric Design
    60. 60. Everything you do in one place
    61. 61. Our rethinking of the inbox...
    62. 62. Caramel - Social Inbox
    63. 63. iOS 6 - Passbook
    64. 64. Android Jelly Bean (4.1) - Google Now
    65. 65. BlackBerry 10 - BlackBerry Hub and Peek
    66. 66. Facebook Messenger - Android
    67. 67. rethinking the camera
    68. 68. just one press.
    69. 69. What if it was automatic? What if there was no more storage?
    70. 70. This will happen with every coreexperience on mobile. And it will be
    71. 71. You will have to think about how to buildat the platform level. This is where we are
    72. 72. Social as a Platform Strategy on Android
    73. 73. Launcher + Social Inbox
    74. 74. Camera
    75. 75. Maps
    76. 76. Payments
    77. 77. Making Android Your Own: Xiaomi / MIUI
    78. 78. Making Android Your Own: Kindle Fire
    79. 79. Making Android Your Own: Baidu Yi
    80. 80. Making Android Your Own: SHARP FEEL UX
    81. 81. Not just phones and tablets and phablets...
    82. 82. “RE-IMAGINATION OF NEARLY EVERYTHING” - Mary Meeker
    83. 83. NEW BEHAVOUR =NEW APPS, NEW TECH, NEW
    84. 84. What does social by default look like for next billion users?
    85. 85. Thank you! Ask me anything:@borisc / boris@xtremelabs.com

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