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Engine Watchkeeping

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E-WATCH PERSONNEL FOR MARINE ENGINEERING COURSES

E-WATCH PERSONNEL FOR MARINE ENGINEERING COURSES

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  • 1. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 2. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 3. Regulation VIII/1 Fitness for duty Each Administration preventing fatigue: shall, for the purpose of .1 establish and enforce rest period for watchkeeping personnel and those whose duties involve designated safety, security and prevention of pollution duties in accordance with the provision of section A-VIII/1 of the STCW Code; and E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 4. .2 require that watch system are so arranged that the efficiency of all watchkeeping personnel is not impaired by fatigue and that duties are so organized that the first watch at the commencement of the voyage and subsequent relieving watches are sufficiently rested and otherwise fit for duty. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 5. Each Administration shall, for the purpose of preventing drug and alcohol abuse, ensure the adequate measures are established in accordance with the provision of section AVIII/1 while taking into account the guidance given in section B-VIII/1 of the STCW Code. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 6. Regulation VIII/2 Watchkeeping Arrangement and Principle to be observed Administrations shall direct the attention of the companies, masters, chief engineer officers and all watch keeping personnel to the requirement, principles and guidance set out in the STCW Code which shall be observed to ensure that a safe continuous watch or watches appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and condition are maintained on all seagoing ships at all times. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 7. Administration shall require the master of every ship to ensure that watch keeping arrangements are adequate for maintaining a safe watch or watches, taking into account the prevailing circumstances and condition and that, under the master’s general direction: E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 8. .1 officer in charge of the navigational watch are responsible for navigating the ship safely during their periods of duty, when they shall physically present on the navigational bridge or in a directly associated location such as the chartroom or bridge control room at all times. .2 radio operators are responsible for maintaining the continuous radio watch on appropriate frequencies during their period of duty. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 9. .3 Officer in charge of an engineering watch, as define in the STCW Code, under the direction of the chief engineer officer, shall be immediately available on call to attend the machinery spaces and, when required, shall be physically present in the machinery spaces during their period of responsibility; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 10. .4 an appropriate and effective watch or watches are maintained for the purpose of safety at all times, while the ship id at anchor or moored and, if the ship id carrying hazardous cargo, the organization of such watch or watches takes full account of the nature, quantity, packing and stowage of the hazardous cargo and of any special condition prevailing onboard, afloat, or ashore; and E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 11. .5 as applicable, an appropriate and effective watch or watches are maintained for the purpose of security. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 12. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 13. Section A-VII/1 Fitness for duty Administration shall take account of the danger posed by fatigue of seafarers, especially those whose duties involve the safe and secure operation of the ship. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 14. All persons who are assigned duty as officer in charge of the watch or as a rating forming part of a watch and those whose duties involve designated safety, prevention of pollution and security duties shall be provided with a rest period of not less than: .1 a minimum of 10 hours of rest in any 24hour period; and .2 77 hours in any 7-day period. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 15. The hours of rest may be divided into no more than two periods, one of which shall be at least l6 hours in length, and the interval between consecutive periods of rest shall not exceed 14 hours. The requirements for rest periods laid down in paragraphs 2 and 3 need not be maintained in the case of an emergency or in other overriding operational conditions. Musters, fire-fighting and lifeboats drills, and drills prescribed by national laws and regulations and by international instruments, shall be conducted in a manner that minimizes the disturbance of rest periods does not induce fatigue. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 16. Administration shall require that watch schedules be posted where they are easily accessible. The schedules shall be established in a standardized format in the working language or languages of the ship and in English. When a seafarer is on call, such as when a machinery space is unattended. The seafarer shall have an adequate compensatory rest period if the normal period of rest is disturbed by call-outs to work. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 17. Administration shall require that records of daily hours of rest of seafarers be maintained in a standardized format, in the working languages or languages of the ship and in English, to allow monitoring and verification of compliance with the provisions of this section. The seafarers shall receive a copy of the records pertaining to them, which shall be endorsed by the master or by a person authorized by the master and by the seafarers. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 18. Nothing in this section shall be deemed to impair the right of the master of a ship to require a seafarer to perform any hours of work necessary for the immediate safety of the ship, persons on board or cargo, or for the purpose of giving assistance to other ships or persons in a distress at sea. Accordingly, the master may suspend the schedule of hours of rest and require a seafarer to perform any hours of necessary until the normal situation has been restored. As soon as practicable after the normal situation has been restored, the master shall ensure that any seafarers who have performed work in a schedule rest period are provided with an adequate period of rest. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 19. Parties may allow exception from the required hours of rest in paragraph 2.2 and 3 above provided that the rest period is not less than 70 hours in any 7-day period. Exceptions from the weekly rest period provided for in paragraph 2.2 shall not be allowed for more than two consecutive weeks. The intervals between two periods of exceptions on board shall not be less than twice the duration of the exception. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 20. The hours of rest provided for in paragraph 2.1 may be divided into no more than three periods, one of which shall be at least 6 hours in length, and neither of the two periods shall not be less than one-hour in length. The intervals between consecutive periods of rest shall not exceed 14 hours. Exceptions shall not extend beyond two 24hour period s in any 7-day period. Exceptions shall, as far as possible, take into account the guidance regarding prevention of fatigue in section B-VII/1. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 21. Each Administration shall established, for the purpose of preventing alcohol abuse, a limit of not greater than 0.05% blood alcohol level (BAC) or 0.25 mg/ alcohol in the breath or a quantity of alcohol leading to such alcohol concentration for masters, officers and other seafarers while performing designated safety, security and marine environment duties. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 22.  Watches shall be carried out based on the following bridge and engine-room resource management principles; Proper arrangements for watchkeeping personnel shall be ensured in accordance with situations; any limitation in qualification or fitness of individuals shall be taken into account when deploying watchkeeping personnel; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 23. understanding of watchkeeping personnel regarding their individual roes, responsibility and team roles shall be establish; the master, chief engineer officer and officer in charge of watch duties shall maintain a proper watch, making the most effective use of the resources available, such as information, installations/equipment and other personnel; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 24. watchkeeping personnel shall understand functions and operation of installations/equipment, and be familiar with handling them; watchkeeping personnel shall understand information and how to respond to information from each station/installation/equipment; information from the stations/installations/ equipment shall be appropriately shared by all the watchkeeping personnel; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 25. watchkeeping personnel shall maintain an exchange of appropriate communication in any situation; and watchkeeping personnel shall notify the master/chief engineer officer/officer in charge of watch duties without any hesitation when in any doubt as to what action to take in the interest of safety. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 26. Principles applying to watchkeeping generally   Parties shall direct the attention of companies, masters, chief engineer officers and watchkeeping personnel to the following principles, which shall be observed to ensure that safe watches are maintained at all times. The master of every ship is bound to ensure that watchkeeping arrangements are adequate for maintaining a safe navigational or cargo watch. Under the master’s general direction, the officers of the navigational watch are responsible for navigating the ship safely during their periods of duty, when they will be particularly concerned with avoiding collision and stranding. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 27.  The is bound, in collision with the master, to ensure that watchkeeping arrangements are adequate to maintain a safe engineering watch. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 28.  The shall be aware of the serious effects of operational or accidental pollution of the marine environment and shall take all possible precautions to prevent such pollution, particularly within the framework of relevant international and port regulations. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 29.  the term engineering watch as used parts 4-2, 5-2, and 5-4 of this section means either a person or personnel comprising the watch or a period of responsibility for an during which the physical presence in machinery spaces of that officer may or may not be required.  the officer in charge of the engineer watch is the chief engineer officer’s representative and is primarily responsible, at all times, for the safe and efficient operation and upkeep of machinery affecting the safety of the ship and is responsible for the inspection, operating and testing, as required, of all machinery and equipment under the responsibility of the engineering watch. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 30. Watch arrangements   The composition of the engineering watch shall’ at all times, be adequate to ensure the safe operation of all machinery affecting the operation of the ship, in either automated or manual mode, and be appropriate to the prevailing circumstances and conditions. When deciding the composition of the engineering watch, which may include appropriately qualified rating, the following criteria, inter alia, shall be taken into account: E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 31. The type of ship and the type and condition of the machinery; The adequate supervision at all times, of machinery affecting the safe operation of the ship; any special modes of operation dictated by conditions such as weather, ice, contaminated water, shallow water, emergency conditions, damage containment or pollution abatement; The qualifications and experience of the engineering watch; The safety of the life, ship, cargo and port, and protection of the environment; The observance of international, national and local regulations and; maintaining the normal operations of the ship. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 32.   The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall not hand the watch to the relieving officer if there is reason to believe that the latter is obviously not capable of carrying out the watch keeping duties effectively, in which case the chief engineer officer shall be notified. The relieving officer of the engineering watch shall ensure that the members of the relieving engineering watch are apparently fully capable of performing their duties effectively. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 33.  Prior to taking over the engineering watch, relieving officers shall satisfy themselves regarding at least the following: the standing orders and special instructions of the chief engineer officer relating to the operation of the ship’s systems and machinery; the nature of all work being performed on machinery and system, the personnel involved and potential hazards; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 34. the level and, where applicable, the condition of water or residues in bilges, ballast tanks, slop tanks, reserve tanks, fresh water tanks, sewage tank and any special requirements for use or disposal of the contents thereof; the condition and level of the fuel in the reverse tanks, settling tanks, day tank and other fuel storage facilities; any special requirements relating to sanitary system disposals; condition and model of operation of the various main and auxiliary systems, including the electrical power distribution system; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 35. where applicable, the condition of monitoring and control console equipment, and which equipment is being operated manually; where applicable, the condition and the mode of operation of automatic boiler controls such as flame safeguard control systems, limit control systems, combustion control systems, fuel-supply control system and other equipment related to the operation of steam boilers; any potentially adverse conditions relating from bad weather, ice or contaminated or shallow water; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 36. any special modes of operation dictated by equipment failure or adverse ship condition; the reports of engine-room ratings relating to their assigned duties; the availability of fire-fighting appliances; and the state of completion of the engine-room log. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 37.  The officers in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that the established watch keeping arrangement are maintained and that, under direction, engine-room ratings, if forming part of the engineering watch, assist in the safe and efficient operation of the propulsion machinery and auxiliary equipment. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 38.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall continue to be responsible for machineryspace operations, despite the presence of the chief engineer officer in the machinery spaces, until specially informed that the chief engineer officer has assumed that responsibility and this is mutually understood. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 39.  All members of the engineering watch shall be familiar with their assigned watch keeping duties. In addition, every member shall, with respect to the ship they are serving in, have knowledge of: the use of appropriate internal communication systems; the escape routes from machinery spaces; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 40. the engine-room alarm systems and be able to distinguish between the various alarms, with special reference to the fire-extinguishing media alarm; and the number, location and types of fire-fighting equipment and damage-control gear in the machinery spaces, together with their use and the various safety precautions to be observed. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 41.   Any machinery not functioning properly, expected to malfunction or requiring special service shall be noted along with any action already taken. Plans shall be made for any further action if required. When the machinery spaces are in the manned condition, the officer in charge of the engineering watch shall at all times be readily capable of operating the propulsion equipment in response to needs for changes in direction or speed. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 42.   When the machinery spaces are in the unmanned condition, the designated duty officer in charge of the engineering watch shall be immediately available and on call to attend the machinery spaces. All bridge order shall be promptly executed. Changes in direction or speed of the main propulsion units shall be recorded, except where an Administration has determined that the size or characteristics of a particular ship make such recording impracticable. The officer in charge of engineering watch shall ensure that the main propulsion units controls, when in the manual mode of operation, are continuously attended under stand-by or maneuverings conditions. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 43.  Due attention shall be paid to the ongoing maintenance and support of all machinery, including mechanical, electrical, electronics, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, their control apparatus and associated safety equipment, all accommodation service systems equipment and the recording of stores and spare gear usage. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 44.  The Chief Engineer officer shall ensure that the officer in charge of the engineering watch is informed of all preventive maintenance, damage control, or repair operations to be performed during the engineering watch. The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall be responsible for the isolation, bypassing and adjustment of all machinery under the responsibility of the engineering watch that is to be worked on, and shall record all work carried out. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 45.  When the engine-room is put in a stand-by condition, the officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that all machinery and equipment which may be used during maneuvering is in a state of immediate readiness and that an adequate reserve of power is available for steering gear and other requirements. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 46.  Officers in charge of an engineering watch shall not be assigned or undertake any duties which would interfere with their supervisory duties in respect of the main propulsion system and ancillary equipment. They shall keep the main propulsion plant and auxiliary systems under constant supervision until properly relieved, and shall periodically inspect the machinery in their charge. They shall also ensure the adequate rounds of the machinery and steering-gear spaces are made for the purpose of observing and reporting equipment malfunctions or breakdowns, performing or directing routine adjustments, required upkeep and any other necessary tasks. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 47.  Officers in charge of an engineering watch shall direct any other member of the engineering watch to inform them of potentially hazardous conditions which may adversely affect the machinery or jeopardize the safety of life or of the ship. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 48.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that the machinery space watch is supervised and shall arrange for substitute personnel in the event of the incapacity of any engineering watch personnel. The engineering watch shall not leave the machinery spaces unsupervised in a manner that would prevent the manual operation of the engine – room plant or throttles. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 49.   The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall take the action necessary to contain the effects of damage resulting from equipment breakdown, fire, flooding, rupture, collision, stranding or other cause. Before going off duty, the officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that all events related to the main and auxiliary machinery which have occurred during the engineering watch are suitably recorded. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 50.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall co – operate with any engineer in charge of maintenance work during all preventive maintenance, damage control or repairs. This shall include, but not necessarily be limited to: E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 51. Isolating and bypassing machinery to be worked on; Adjusting the remaining plant to function adequately and safely during the maintenance period; Recording in the engine – room log or other suitable document, the equipment worked on and the personnel involved, and which safety steps have been taken and by whom, for the benefit of relieving officers and for record purposes; and Testing and putting into service, when necessary, the repaired machinery or equipment. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 52.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that any engine – room ratings who perform maintenance duties are available to assist in the manual operation of machinery in the event of automatic equipment failure. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 53.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall bear in mind that changes in speed, resulting from machinery malfunction, or any loss of steering may imperil the safety of the ship and life at sea. The bridge shall be immediately notified in the event of fire and of any impending action in machinery spaces that may cause reduction in the ship’s speed, imminent steering failure, stoppage of the ship’s propulsion system or any alteration in the generation of electric power or similar threat to safety. This notification, where possible, shall be accomplished before changes are made, in order to afford the bridge the maximum available time to take whatever action is possible to avoid a potential marine casualty. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 54. 1. When engine damage or a malfunction occurs which may be such as to endanger the safe operation of the ship. 2. When any malfunction occurs which, it is believed, may cause damage or breakdown of propulsion machinery, auxiliary machinery or monitoring and governing systems and 3. In any emergency or if in any doubt as to what decision or measures to take. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 55.  Despite the requirement to notify the chief engineer officer in the foregoing circumstances, the officer in charge of the engineering watch shall not hesitate to take immediate action for the safety of the ship, its machinery and crew where circumstances require. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 56.  The Officer In Charge of the engineering watch shall give the watchkeeping personnel all appropriate instructions and information which will ensure the keeping of a safe engineering watch. Routine machinery upkeep, performed as incidental tasks as a part of keeping a safe watch, shall be set up as an integral part of the watch routine. Detailed repair maintenance involving repairs to electrical, mechanical, hydraulic, pneumatic or applicable electronic equipment throughout the ship shall be performed with the cognizance of the officer in charge of the engineering watch and chief engineer officer. These repairs shall be recorded. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 57.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that permanent air or steam pressure is available for sound signals and that at all times bridge orders relating to changes in speed or direction of operation are immediately implemented and, in addition, that auxiliary machinery used for maneuvering is readily available. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 58.  The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that all machinery involved with the maneuvering of the ship can immediately be placed in the manual mode of operation when notified that the ship is in congested waters. The officer in charge of the engineering watch shall also ensure that an adequate reserve of power is available for steering and other maneuvering requirements. Emergency steering and other auxiliary equipment shall be ready for immediate operation. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 59.  At an unsheltered anchorage the chief engineer officer shall consult with the master whether or not to maintain the same engineering watch as when under way. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 60.  When a ship is at anchor in an open roadstead or any other virtually “at-sea” condition, the engineer officer in charge of the engineering watch shall ensure that: an efficient engineering watch is kept; periodic inspection is made of all operating and stand-by machinery; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 61. main and auxiliary machinery is maintained in a state of readiness in accordance with orders from the bridge; measures are taken to protect the environment from pollution by the ship, and that applicable pollution-prevention regulations are complied with; and all damage-control and fire-fighting systems are in readiness. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 62. RECOMMENDATIONS ON WATCHKEEPING E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 63. Section B-VIII/1 In observing the rest period requirements, “overriding operational conditions” should be construed to mean only essential shipboard work which cannot be delayed for safety, security or environmental reasons or which could not reasonably been anticipated at the commencement of the voyage. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 64. Although there is no universally accepted technical definition of fatigue, everyone involved in ship operation should be alert to the factors which can contribute to fatigue, including, but not limited to, those identified by the Organization, and take them into account when making decisions on ship operations. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 65. In applying regulation VIII/1, the following should be taken into account: .1 provisions made to prevent fatigue should ensure that excessive or unreasonable overall working hours are not undertaken. In particular, the minimum rest periods specified in section A-VIII/1 should not be interpreted as implying that all other hours may be devoted to watchkeeping or other duties; E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 66. .2 the frequency and length of leave periods, and the granting of compensatory leave, are material factors in preventing fatigue from building up over a period of time; and .3 The provisions may be varies for ships on short sea voyages, provided special safety arrangements are put in place. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 67. 4. Exceptions provided for in section AVIII/1, paragraph 9, should be construed to mean the exceptions laid down by the ILO Convention o Seafarers’ Hours of Works and the Manning of Ships, 1996 (No.180) or the Maritime Labour Convention, 2006, when it enters into force. The circumstances under which such exceptions are applied should be defined by the Parties. 5. Based on information received as a result of investigating maritime casualties, Administration should keep their provisions on prevention of fatigue under review. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 68. 6. Drug and alcohol abuse directly affect the fitness and ability of a seafarer to perform watchkeeping duties or duties that involve designated safety, prevention of pollution and security duties. Seafarers found to be under the influence of drugs or alcohol should not be permitted to perform watchkeeping duties or duties that involve designated safety, prevention of pollution or security duties, until they are no longer impaired in their ability to perform those duties. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 69. 7. Administration should ensure that adequate measure are taken to prevent alcohol and drugs from impairing the ability of watchkeeping personnel and those whose duties involves designated safety, prevention of pollution and security duties, and should establish screening programs as necessary which: E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 70. .1 identify drug and alcohol abuse; .2 Respect the dignity, privacy, confidentiality and fundamental legal rights of the individuals concerned; and .3 Take into account relevant international guidelines. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 71. 8. Companies should consider the implementation of a clearly written policy of drug and alcohol abuse prevention, including prohibition to consume alcohol within four hours prior to serving as a member of a watch either by inclusion in the company’s quality-management system or by means of providing adequate information and education to the seafarers. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 72. 9. Those involved in establishing drug and alcohol abuse prevention programmes should take into account the guidance contained in the ILO publication Drug and Alcohol Prevention Programmes in the Maritime Industry (A Manual for Planners), as may be amended. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 73.  The following operational guidance should be taken into account by companies, masters and watchkeeping officers. Part 1 – Guidance on Certification (No provisions) Part 2 – Guidance on Voyage Planning (No provisions) Part 3 – Watckeeping Principles in General (No provisions) Part 4 – Guidance on Watchkeeping at Sea E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 74.  Particular guidance may be necessary for special types of propulsion system or ancillary equipment and for ship carrying hazardous, dangerous, toxic or highly flammable materials or other special types of cargo. The chief engineer officer should provide this operational guidance as appropriate. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 75.  It is essential that the officer in charge of the engineering watch appreciate that the efficient performance of engineering watchkeeping duties is necessary in the interest of the safety of life at sea and of preventing pollution on the marine environment. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 76.  The relieving officer, before assuming in charge of the engineering watch, should: .1 be familiar with the location and use of the equipment provided for the safety of life in a hazardous or toxic environment. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 77. .2 ascertain that materials for the administration of emergency medical first aid are readily available, particularly those required for the treatment of burns an d scalds; and .3 when in port, safety anchored and moored , be aware of: E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 78. .3.1 cargo activities . the status of maintenance and repair functions and all other operations affecting the watch , and .3.2 the auxiliary machinery in use for passenger or crew accommodation services, cargo operation, operational water supplies and exhaust systems E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 79. E-S4A1 BATCH 2014
  • 80. SUBMITTED BY: E-S4A1 STUDENTS SUBMITTED TO: ENGR. G.C. DUBLOIS ENGINE WATCHKEEPING E-S4A1 BATCH 2014

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