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Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education
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Massive Open Online Courses and the New Game of Higher Education

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Explores the emerging - and diverging - models of Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) offerings, and how Connectivist MOOCs and Xmodel MOOCs such as EdX, MITx, Udacity et al reflect very different …

Explores the emerging - and diverging - models of Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) offerings, and how Connectivist MOOCs and Xmodel MOOCs such as EdX, MITx, Udacity et al reflect very different visions of the changing game of higher education.

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  • 1. Beyond the Walls of the Academy: Massive Open Online Courses & the New Game of Higher Education Bonnie Stewart, UPEI
  • 2. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) =Not your average online courses
  • 3. MOOCs = The Great Disruption?
  • 4. The New Game of Higher Educationhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/ranil_amarasuriya/2770495948/The linear, structured world of knowledge scarcity http://www.flickr.com/photos/steveweaver/3937785267 The complex networked world of knowledge abundance
  • 5. Cynefin Frameworkhttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/45/Cynefin_framework_Feb_2011.jpeg/486px-Cynefin_framework_Feb_2011.jpeg
  • 6. Three Facets of OpenAccessResources http://www.flickr.com/photos/smichael/4563914649/Knowledge Creation
  • 7. Narrative InquiryWhat does it mean to be in a MOOC?
  • 8. Emergent Themes MOOCs embody digital practicesHarness knowledge abundance Are participatory Are networked Are distributedShare the processes ofknowledge work, not just the products http://www.flickr.com/photos/rofi/2647699204 /
  • 9. Emergent Themes MOOCs reflect the broader culture: when change is continual & expected, people engage in learning opportunities in order to increase personal capital and remainhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/heycoach/1197947341 marketable
  • 10. Knowledge in MOOCs =Negotiated, Public, Indeterminate “Today, whatever can be easily duplicated cannot serve as the foundation for economic value. Instead of producing entities with known and approved knowledge, the digital economic model harnesses the capacity of its citizens to connect, innovate, andreconfigure the known into new knowledge.” p. 43
  • 11. Fast Forward: 2011-2012 #change11“The Mother of All MOOCS” 36 weeks, 36 facilitators
  • 12. ...Along come the Really Massive MOOCS http://www.flickr.com/photos/godutchbaby/3945653742/
  • 13. - The X Model -Stanford AI – Sept 2011MITx – Dec 2011Udacity – Jan 2012Coursera – April 2012EdX – May 2012 ...? http://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisinplymouth/3552059342
  • 14. Two Roads Diverged in a Yellow Wood... http://www.flickr.com/photos/paro_for_peace/2715460542/
  • 15. Connectivist MOOCs & X MOOCS - Commonalities - Open Access Open Resource Online Global interest & registration Post-registration filtering
  • 16. Connectivist MOOCs & X MOOCS - Differences - Who are the registrants?How do they connect with/learn from each other?How do they connect with/learn from facilitators? What counts as learning? What is the business model? Where is the disruption?
  • 17. The X Model: Triumph of the Traditional? http://www.flickr.com/photos/wiccked/133164205/ In a global educational economy,network power laws favour wealth & status
  • 18. - EdX Press Release May 2, 2012
  • 19. X MOOCs Business Model... = Data? http://www.flickr.com/photos/kaptainkobold/5066287053
  • 20. Measuring known/knowable will not help us understand complexity, networks, or knowledge abundancehttp://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/45/Cynefin_framework_Feb_2011.jpeg/486px-
  • 21. http://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/2551375149/What Will Be Our Move?
  • 22. Keeping Complexity in the Game: the FHE12 Open Online Course
  • 23. Be part of the conversation. http://edfuture.net/ THANK YOU! @bonstewart bstewart@upei.caCreated with the support of the Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council

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