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Bonn Juego's Lecture Abstract, 7th sem, 2011 (Bonn Juego)
 

Bonn Juego's Lecture Abstract, 7th sem, 2011 (Bonn Juego)

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Lecture abstract for AAU-DIR students....

Lecture abstract for AAU-DIR students....

"Development:

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    Bonn Juego's Lecture Abstract, 7th sem, 2011 (Bonn Juego) Bonn Juego's Lecture Abstract, 7th sem, 2011 (Bonn Juego) Document Transcript

    • 7th Semester, 2011 DIR Lecture Abstract Development: Theories, Policies, and Strategies in Critical, Historical, and Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Parts I, II, III)Lecturer: Bonn JuegoDates: Part I: 3 October 2011 (Time: 12.30 – 14.15) Part II: 5 October 2011 (Time: 08.15 – 10:00) Part III: 12 October 2011 (Time: 14.30 – 16.15)Room: Fibigerstraede 2, room 1 – Aalborg University, DenmarkThe lecture will be composed of three interrelated parts and will be held in threedifferent sessions—on 3, 5, and 12 October.The first and second parts will give a comprehensive survey and review of theclassic debates—both old and contemporary—that have shaped development theoryand policy in the last 500 years. The scope ranges from the political economy ofcapitalist development under conditions of imperialism to the particularities of state-market relations in the epoch of neoliberal globalisation. It will investigate the causesof the wealth and poverty of nations, examining varying factors (such as culture,institutions, geography, disease, technology, and economic activities) identified andpromoted in development thought and practice from the 17th century to the present.The third part will give an overview of political-economic development strategiesthat have made rich countries rich, from England to continental Europe and theUnited States of America in the 17th-20th centuries, and East Asia since the late 20thcentury. At the same time, it will discuss why poor countries stay poor and why it hasbeen difficult to create middle-income countries at this historical juncture withreference to the centuries- and decades-old tragedies in major parts of Africa, Asia,Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Special attention is given to policy success andfailures in specific contexts, history of colonialism, theory of uneven economicdevelopment, the crisis of neoliberalism, ‘welfare colonialism’ in the development aidsystem, and the material and ideological interests in the politics and economics ofdevelopment.The three lecture sessions will be discussed in an interdisciplinary approach derivedfrom the fields of critical political economy, development economics, and economichistory. Particular emphasis is given not only on the ‘history of development thought’(i.e., what theorists said must happen) but on the seemingly non-existent academicdiscipline: the ‘history of development policy and strategy’ (i.e., what policies andstrategies were/are actually followed).Students are very much encouraged to read the references before the lecture sessions.Lecture slides are not substitutes for the reading references. Active participation in thedebates and discussions is most earnestly sought.
    • REFERENCES:Ha-Joon Chang (2003) Kicking Away the Ladder: Development Strategy in Historical Perspective, London: Anthem Press.Justin Lin and Ha-Joon Chang (2009) ‘Should Industrial Policy in Developing Countries Conform to Comparative Advantage or Defy it? A Debate Between Justin Lin and Ha-Joon Chang’, in Development Policy Review, Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 483-502.Ben Fine, Costas Lapavitsas, and Jonathan Pincus (eds) (2001) Development Policy in the Twenty-First Century: Beyond the post-Washington Consensus, Oxon: Routledge.David Harvey (2005) A Brief History of Neoliberalism, Oxford: Oxford University Press.David Harvey (2011) The Enigma of Capital: And the Crises of Capitalism, London: Profile Books.Ronaldo Munck and Denis O’Hearn (eds) (1999) Critical Development Theory: Contributions to a New Paradigm, London: Zed Books.Erik Reinert (2007) How Rich Countries Got Rich ... And Why Poor Countries Stay Poor, London: Constable.John Toye (1987) Dilemmas of Development: Reflections on the Counter-Revolution in Development Theory and Policy, Oxford: Basil Blackwell.DOWNLOADABLE READING MATERIALS:Ha-Joon Chang (2011) ‘Hamlet without the Prince of Denmark: how development has disappeared from today’s “development” discourse’, in Shahrukh Rafi Khan and Jens Christiansen (eds) Towards New Developmentalism: Market as means rather than master, Oxon: Routledge, pp. 47-58.David Harvey (2011) The Enigma of Capital: And the Crises of Capitalism, London: Profile Books. Chapter 5 – ‘Capital Evolves’, pp. 119-139.Justin Lin and Ha-Joon Chang (2009) ‘Should Industrial Policy in Developing Countries Conform to Comparative Advantage or Defy it? A Debate Between Justin Lin and Ha-Joon Chang’, in Development Policy Review, Vol. 27, No. 5, pp. 483-502.Erik Reinert (2006) ‘Development and Social Goals: Balancing Aid and Development to Prevent “Welfare Colonialism”’, DESA Working Paper No. 14, United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, January.