The Contributions of Dr. J. Mark Erickson to the Geological Literature
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The Contributions of Dr. J. Mark Erickson to the Geological Literature

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A scientist's record of scholarly publications serves as a lasting testament to their interests, commitments and passions. Dr J. Mark Erickson has over 45 scholarly publications demonstrating his ...

A scientist's record of scholarly publications serves as a lasting testament to their interests, commitments and passions. Dr J. Mark Erickson has over 45 scholarly publications demonstrating his longstanding commitment to undergraduate research, his exceptional scholarship, and his interest in the regional geology of both the North Country and North Dakota. Dr. Erickson's commitment to undergraduate research started long before it was fashionable, as seen by his first publications in The Compass, the journal of Sigma Gamma Epsilon. His bibliography includes publications in prestigious journals like Nature and the Journal of Paleontology, illustrating the high quality of his scholarship. Smaller organizations like the New York State Geological Association and the North Dakota Academy of Sciences also benefitted from his contributions. Dr. Erickson often chose to work with current and former students, co-authoring with them on many publications. In addition to Dr. Erickson's bibliography, his other vital contribution to the geological sciences is the group of scholars and students he taught and mentored during his time at St. Lawrence. Many of these students have gone on to have illustrious careers as geoscience scholars, thanks largely to the education they received from Dr. Erickson and St. Lawrence University.

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The Contributions of Dr. J. Mark Erickson to the Geological Literature The Contributions of Dr. J. Mark Erickson to the Geological Literature Document Transcript

  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE With Students And Scholars, From The10/6/12 North Country To The International Community BY BONNIE J. M. SWOGER Milne Library, SUNY Geneseo, Geneseo, NY, 14454 bonnie.swoger@gmail.com
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE ABSTRACT A scientists record of scholarly publications serves as a lasting testament to their interests, commitments and passions. Dr J. Mark Erickson has over 45 scholarly publications demonstrating his longstanding commitment to undergraduate research, his exceptional scholarship, and his interest in the regional geology of both the North Country and North Dakota. Dr. Ericksons commitment to undergraduate research started long before it was fashionable, as seen by his first publications in The Compass, the journal of Sigma Gamma Epsilon. His bibliography includes publications in prestigious journals like Nature and the Journal of Paleontology, illustrating the high quality of his scholarship. Smaller organizations like the New York State Geological Association and the North Dakota Academy of Sciences also benefitted from his contributions. Dr. Erickson often chose to work with current and former students, co-authoring with them on many publications. In addition to Dr. Ericksons bibliography, his other vital contribution to the geological sciences is the group of scholars and students he taught and mentored during his time at St. Lawrence. Many of these students have gone on to have illustrious careers as geoscience scholars, thanks largely to the education they received from Dr. Erickson and St. Lawrence University.Page 1
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE WITH STUDENTS AND SCHOLARS, FROM THE NORTH COUNTRY TO THE INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY THE PUBLICATION RECORD OF DR. J MARK ERICKSON Dr. Erickson has a broad and interesting publication history. His first peer reviewed paper was published in the Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon (Erickson, 1969) prior to the completion of his PhD dissertation in 1971. Over the next 41 years, his publication history was remarkably consistent (see figure 1), averaging at least one publication a year, not including national and regional conference presentations (of which there were many). While many researchers hit a peak in their 50s (Gingras et al., 2008), Dr. Erickson has continued his research at a similar rate although his co-authors have shifted from his mentors to his students and former students over time. Dr. Erickson has published in a wide range of journals. Depending on the topic, he has published in high impact publications such as Nature and the Journal of Paleontology, as well as local and regional publications (see table 1). He has contributed to local conferences and field trips, writing for the NewFIGURE 1: DR. ERICKSON’S PUBLICATIONS OVER TIME. HIS PRODUCTIVITY HAS BEEN REMARKABLY CONSISTENT, ANDEVEN SAW AN INCREASE AS HE NEARED RETIREMENT Page 2
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREYork Geological Association Guidebooks and submitting papers to regional conferences about the GreatLakes, the North Country and the Grass River. Dr. Erickson has TABLE 1: PUBLICATION SOURCES, EXCLUDING CONFERENCE ABSTRACTS, OF DR. ERICKSON. published on a wide Journal   Publications   range of topics in Compass  of  Sigma  Gamma  Epsilon   8   paleontology, Journal  of  Paleontology   3   stratigraphy and Bulletin  of  the  Buffalo  Society  of  Natural  Sciences   2   biology. He has Journal  of  Sedimentary  Research   * 2   concentrated his work in three main North  Dakota  Academy  of  Science  Proceedings   2   geographical regions: Proceedings  of  the  North  Dakota  Academy  of  Science   2   the North Country of Bulletins  of  American  Paleontology   1   New York, North Earth  Science  Curriculum  Project  Newsletter   1   Dakota and South West Nature   1   Ohio. Additional Palaeontology   1   locations include Palaios   1   Glovers Pond, New The  New  Phytologist   1   Jersey and the The  Open  Paleontology  Journal   1   Holocene Hiscock site in * Formerly known as the Journal of Sedimentary Petrology Western New York. He has worked on rockunits in those areas familiar to his paleontology students: The Fox Hills formation of North Dakota, thePotsdam Sandstone of Northern New York, and the formations that make up the Cincinnati Arch.Dr. Erickson has published research on a wide variety of extinct and modern invertebrate speciesincluding snails, clams, mites and bryozoan. He has even found the time to publish and present researchabout vertebrate species and plant fossils found in his study areas.A basic topic analysis of this publications can be done by creating a word cloud out of his publicationtitles, emphasizing his major interests in the Fox Hills Formation of North Dakota and topics associatedwith it (see figure 2).Exclusive of conference presentations, Dr. Erickson has collaborated with others on 27 of his 45publications. Most commonly he works with one other collaborator but has written 8 papers with threeauthors, 2 papers with 4 authors and is listed among the 27 authors in a recent paper by St. LawrenceUniversity geology alumnus Dan Peppe ’03 (Peppe et al., 2011). Dr. Erickson has published fewer singleauthor papers in the last 10 years, but continues to collaborate closely with one or two co-authors foreach publication.Of these co-authors, many were current or former students. This commitment to undergraduate researchstarted long before the 1998 Boyer Commission report on undergraduate research made it fashionable(Katkin, 2003). Early publications with students often appeared in The Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilonor regional publications (e.g. Klett & Erickson, 1974), but latter student (and former student) publicationshave appeared in a wide variety of journals.Page 3
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREFIGURE 2: WORD CLOUD CREATED FROM THE TITLES OF DR. ERICKSON’S PRINT PUBLICATIONS. CREATED WITH WORDLE, AVAILABLE ATHTTP://WWW.WORDLE.NETCITATIONS TO DR. ERICKSON’S PUBLICATIONSThe impact of Dr. Erickson on the geological literature extends beyond his own publications to thoseresearchers who have found Dr. Erickson’s research useful and cited them in their own work. Citations tothese publications can be found in multiple databases including Web of Science (Thomson), Scopus(Elsevier) and Google Scholar.Scopus and Web of Science list 120 publications that have cited Dr. Erickson’s work over time. This canbe considered a minimum possible number for two reasons. First, only a quarter of Dr. Erickson’spublications are listed in Web of Science or Scopus, since he chose to publish in many small or regionaljournals. While these works may have received the most citations due to their ease of discovery othercited works exist. Second, many of the works that might cite Dr. Erickson’s work may not be listed in thetwo citation databases.The first citation to Dr. Erickson’s work appeared in an article in the Journal of Sedimentary Petrology in1977 (KELLING and MOSHRIF, 1977) and was followed by a relatively quiet period until his workstarted to be cited more in the late 1980s. The lag between Dr. Erickson’s early publication record andhis citation record may be the result of the relatively low circulation of the first journals he published in(i.e. The Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, the North Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, etc.).Citations to Dr. Erickson’s work have increased exponentially since the early 1980s (figure 3). Earlycitations came mostly from The Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, Sedimentary Geology and Geology. Inrecent years, Dr. Erickson’s work has been cited by international journals including publications from India,Canada, Britain, France, Denmark, Poland, and New Zealand. Page 4
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE FIGURE 3: CUMULATIVE CITATIONS TO DR. Cumulative citations ERICKSONS WORK. FOLLOWING A STEADY INCREASE IN CITATIONS IN THE 1990S, THE RATE OF CITATION INCREASED 140 EXPONENTIALLY IN THE PAST DECADE 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020His most cited paper is from the Journal of Sedimentary Petrology (now the Journal of SedimentaryResearch) and was co-authored with a former student, Scott Carpenter, ’85 (Carpenter et al., 1988). Ithas been cited 20 times in Scopus, 35 times in Web of Science, and 57 times in Google Scholar (seeYang and Meho, 2006, TABLE 2: TOP PUBLICATION SOURCES CITING ARTICLES BY DR. ERICKSONfor a description of thedifferences between the Journal     Publications  resources). Journal  of  Sedimentary  Research*   13  Dr. Erickson’s research Palaeogeography  Palaeoclimatology  Palaeoecology 7  has been useful to a Canadian  Journal  of  Fisheries  and  Aquatic  Sciences   5  wider variety of subjects Journal  of  Paleontology   4  than he perhaps Journal  of  Vertebrate  Paleontology   4  originally envisioned. New  Phytologist   4  Biological journals such Palaios   4  as New Phytologist, PLOS  ONE   4  Marine Ecology and the Geology   3  American Journal of Ichnos   3  Botany now make up a Neues  Jahrbuch  fur  Geologie  und  Palaontologie   3  large portion his citing Sedimentology   3  references (table 2). Earth  and  Plantetary  Science  Letters   2  In addition to citations, Journal  of  Archaeological  Science   2  some researchers are Lethaia   2  also beginning to Marine  Ecology   2  examine other uses of a Proceedings  of  the  Royal  Society  B:  Biological  Sciences   2  scholars work. Known as Sedimentary  Geology   2  altmetrics (Priem et al., Environmental  Biology  of  Fishes   2  2011), these tools allow * Formerly known as the Journal of Sedimentary Petrologyresearchers to see howPage 5
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREtheir works are being read or shared with others by examining article downloads, mentions in newsstories or elsewhere on the web, or how often an article is saved to a citation network such as Mendeley(http://www.mendeley.com) or CiteULike (http://www.citeulike.org). The altmetrics analytical toolImpactStory tells us that several of Dr. Erickson’s works have been saved to these citation networks, andat least one of his works has been cited on Wikipedia. The brief entry about Ischyodus(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ischyodus) cites a 2005 publication from Palaeontology (Hoganson andErickson, 2005). The complete ImpactStory analysis of Dr. Erickson’s publications (only those that have aDOI are included) is available online here: http://impactstory.it/collection/nxvs5lA word cloud created from article titles that cite Dr. Erickson’s research demonstrate the usefulness of thiswork beyond his primary study areas. Researchers studying paleoclimates, modern invertebrates andgeochemistry have cited Dr. Erickson’s work (figure 4).FIGURE 4: WORD CLOUD CREATED FROM THE TITLES OF PAPERS CITING DR. ERICKSON’S PUBLICATIONS. CREATED WITH WORDLE, AVAILABLE ATHTTP://WWW.WORDLE.NETWORK OF DR. ERICKSON’S STUDENTSAlthough Dr. Erickson’s publications will continue to be read and cited for years to come, his greatestinfluence on the field of geology may be the group of students he taught during his tenure at St.Lawrence University. This influence is seen in the contributions of these students to their chosen fields.Many St. Lawrence University geology alumni have gone on to pursue academic careers and their ownrecord of scholarly publication. Some have co-authored with Dr. Erickson during their time at St.Lawrence or long after their graduation. Page 6
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREDuring his time at St. Lawrence University, Dr. Erickson supervised at least 63 senior theses, starting in1974.Working from the list of Geology department theses, I was able to identify 91 publications by formerstudents who completed senior theses supervised by Dr. Erickson. While some have continued to work inpaleontology or stratigraphy, others have expanded their interests into igneous petrology,paleoclimatology, botany and physicalanthropology. An online bibliography of PUBLICATIONS OF FORMER STUDENTS OF DR.these publications is available at the website J. MARK ERICKSONof Mendeley, the citation manager anddiscovery tool.Certainly, this list of 91 publications is a grossunderestimate of the work done by Dr. Add your publications to the bibliography of Dr.Erickson’s students. Some alumni didn’t Erickson’s students.complete a thesis but went on publishextensively. Others (including this author) Go to http://bit.ly/Ericksons_Students_Publicationscompleted a thesis with another advisor but Or send citation information to Bonnie Swoger,consider Dr. Erickson an important influence in bonnie.swoger@gmail.comtheir professional careers.In order to add to this list of 91 publications,a public bibliography has been created using Mendeley. The Mendeley group, Publications of formerstudents of Dr. J. Mark Erickson is open to the public and can be found online athttp://www.mendeley.com/groups/2638941/publications-of-former-students-of-dr-j-mark-erickson/.Alumni are invited to join Mendeley and add their publications to this list. Alternatively, contact BonnieSwoger ’99 (bonnie.swoger@gmail.com) with details of your publications to be added to this list.TOTAL IMPACTBy combining the publications from Dr. Erickson, his students and the articles that cite Dr. Erickson, we canget a more complete picture of Dr. Erickson’s impact on the scientific literature. We can compare thejournals on this list of publications to the map of scientific fields created by analyzing citation patterns inthe journal literature from Web of Science (Börner et al., 2012). Using the Sci2 analysis tool (Sci2 Team,2009), we can visualize the fields that have been influenced by Dr. Erickson and his students (figure 5).While much of his influence is concentrated in the Earth Sciences (as expected), his work is almost asinfluential in biology, with some topical coverage in chemistry. Small circles in unexpected disciplines(brain research, health professions) are artifacts of publications in general topic journals such a Nature,PLOS ONE, and the American Journal of Science.Page 7
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREFIGURE 5: TOPICAL ANALYSIS OF JOURNAL ARTICLES PUBLISHED BY DR. ERICKSON, HIS STUDENTS, AND ARTICLES CITING DR. ERICKSON.CONCLUSIONDr. J. Mark Erickson has had a remarkably productive publishing career. He has consistently publishedhis findings in national and regional publications, and other scholars have continued to find this researchuseful. Over the course of his career his research interests have expanded both geographically andtopically.Despite Dr. Erickson’s retirement, his influence on geology and the geological literature has not begun towane. His research is still being cited, and his students have long careers ahead of them. Page 8
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREDr. J. Mark Erickson’s BibliographyAn online bibliography of Dr. Erickson’s publications can be found on Mendeley at the link below.Abstracts, keywords and links to online full text sources are included when available.http://www.mendeley.com/groups/2485231/j-mark-erickson-s-publications/Bailey, L.T., and Erickson, J.M., 1973, Preferred orientation of bivalve shells in the upper Timber Lake Member, Fox Hills Formation in North Dakota; Preliminary interpretations: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 50, no. 2, p. 23–37.Bjerstedt, T.W., and Erickson, J.M., 1989, Trace fossils and bioturbation in peritidal facies of the Potsdam-Theresa formations (Cambrian-Ordovician), Northwest Adirondacks: Palaios, v. 4, no. 3, p. 203–224.Burton-Kelly, M.E., and Erickson, J.M., 2010, A New Occurrence of Protichnites Owen, 1852, in the Late Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone of the St. Lawrence Lowlands: The Open Paleontology Journal, v. 3, no. 1, p. 1–13, doi: 10.2174/1874425701003010001.Carpenter, S.J., Erickson, J.M., Lohmann, K.C., and Owen, M.R., 1988, Diagenesis of fossiliferous concretions from the Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills Formation, North Dakota: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v. 58, no. 4, p. 706–723, doi: 10.1306/212F8E27-2B24-11D7- 8648000102C1865D.Carpenter, S.J., Erickson, J.M., and Holland, F.D., 2003, Migration of a Late Cretaceous fish.: Nature, v. 423, no. 6935, p. 70–4, doi: 10.1038/nature01575.Chayes, D.N., and Erickson, J.M., 1973, Preliminary paleocurrent analysis from cross-strata in the Timber Lake Member, Fox Hills Formation, in North Dakota: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 50, no. 2, p. 38–44.Congiu, B., Chrapowitzky, L., and Erickson, J.M., 2007, The Eta Xi Chapter of Sigma Gamma Epsilon: Day one at St. Lawrence: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 80, no. 1, p. 19–21.Cvancara, A.M.M., Erickson, J.M., Delimata, J.D., and Delimata., J.J., 1972, Present and Past Mollusks of the Forest River, North Dakota: North Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, v. 25, no. 1, p. 55.Erickson, J.M., 1992a, A Dedication to F. D. Holland, Jr., Prairie Paleontologist, from former students and colleagues (published anonymously), in Proceedings of the F. D. Holland Jr. Symposium, North Dakota Geological Survey Miscellaneous Series 76, p. 1–9.Erickson, J.M., 1970, A floating coring platform for use on sheltered lakes: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 47, no. 3, p. 169–173.Erickson, J.M., 1993, A preliminary evaluation of dubiofossils from the Potsdam Sandstone, in Bursnall, J. ed., Field trip guidebook  : New York State Geological Association 65th Annual Meeting, September 24-26, 1993, Department of Geology, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York, New York State Geological Association, Canton, New York, p. 121–130.Page 9
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREErickson, J.M., 1978, Bivalve Mollusk Range Extensions in the Fox Hills Formation (Maestrichtian) of North and South Dakota and their Implications for the Late Cretaceous Geologic History of the Williston Basin: Proceedings of the North Dakota Academy of Science, v. 32, no. 2, p. 79 – 89.Erickson, J.M., 1997a, Can Paleoacarology Contribute to Global Change Research?, in Mitchel, R. ed., Proceedings of the 9th International Congress of Acarology, Columbus, Ohio, p. 533–538.Erickson, J.M., 1988, Fossil oribatid mites as tools for Quaternary paleoecologists: preservation quality, quantities, and taphonomy: Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, v. 33, p. 207–226.Erickson, J.M., 1971a, Gastropoda of the Fox Hills Formation (Maestrichtian-Upper Cretaceous) of North Dakota. PhD Dissertation, University of North Dakota.Erickson, J.M., 1969, Geological rate units: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 47, no. 1, p. 5–9.Erickson, J.M., 1997b, If we build it, they will come: A plan for main hall exhibitory at the St. Lawrence Aquarium and Ecological Center: Report Series of the A. C. Walker Foundation North Country Research Fellowships, 1–33 p.Erickson, J.M., 1973, Maestrichtian paleogeography in light of the gastropod fauna of the Fox Hills Formation in North Dakota: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 50, no. 2, p. 7–17.Erickson, J.M., 1974, Revision of the Gastropoda of the Fox Hills Formation, upper Cretaceous (Maestrichtian) of North Dakota: Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 66, no. 284, p. 131–253.Erickson, J.M., 1992b, Subsurface stratigraphy, lithofacies, and paleoenvironments of the Fox Hills Formation (Maastrichtian: Late Cretaceous) adjacent to the type area, North, in Erickson, J. and Hoganson, J. eds., Proceedings of the F. D. Holland Jr. Symposium, North Dakota Geological Survey Miscellaneous Series 76, p. 199–243.Erickson, J.M., 1984, Summary of Paleontological Data from Massena “Clay” Locality, in Clark, P. and Street, J.S. eds., Late Quaternary, St. Lawrence Lowland; Guidebook of the 47th Annual Meeting of Friends of the Pleistocene, p. 28.Erickson, J.M., 1999, The Dakota Isthmus – Closing the Late Cretaceous Western Interior Seaway, in The Paleontologic and Geologic Record of North Dakota – Important sites and current interpretations. North Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, p. 124–129.Erickson, J.M., 1968, The geologic and limnologic history of Glovers Pond, northwestern New Jersey.Erickson, J.M., 1983, Trichopterodomus leonardi, a new genus and species of psychomyiid caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) represented by retreats from the Paleocene of North: Journal of Paleontology, v. 57, no. 3, p. 560–567.Erickson, J.M., 1971b, Wind-oriented gastropod shells as indicators of paleowind direction: Journal of Sedimentary Research, v. 41, no. 2, p. 589–593.Erickson, J.M., and Bjerstedt, T.W., 1993, Trace Fossils and Stratigraphy in the Potsdam and Theresa Formations of the St. Lawrence Lowland, New York, in Bursnall, J.T. ed., Field trip guidebook  : New York State Geological Association 65th Annual Meeting, September 24-26, 1993, Page 10
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATURE Department of Geology, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York, New York State Geological Association, Canton, New York, p. 97–119.Erickson, J.M., and Bouchard, T.D., 2003, and interpretation of Sanctum laurentiensis, new ichnogenus and ichnospecies, a domichnium mined into Late Ordovician (Cincinnatian) ramose bryozoan colonies: Journal of Paleontology, v. 77, no. 5, p. 1002–1010, doi: 10.1666/0022-3360(2003)077.Erickson, J.M., Connett, P., and Fetterman, A.R., 1993, Distribution of Trace Fossils preserved in high energy deposits of the Potsdam Sandstone, Champlain, New York, in Bursnall, J. ed., Field trip guidebook  : New York State Geological Association 65th Annual Meeting, September 24-26, 1993, Department of Geology, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York, New York State Geological Association, Canton, New York, p. 131–143.Erickson, J.M., and Fetterman, A.R., 1996, The Unionacean fauna of the Grass River Drainage, St. Lawrence County, New York, in Needham, R.D. and Kovakowski, E.N. eds., Sharing Knowledge, Linking Sciences: An International Conference on the St. Lawrence Ecosystem, Conference Proceedings, p. 211–223.Erickson, J.M., and Garvey, K.L., 1997, Key to the Unionacean Clams (mollusca) of the Grass River Drainage, St. Lawrence County, New York: St. Lawrence Aquarium and ecological Center.Erickson, J.M., and Platt Jr, R.B., 2007, Orbatid Mites (S. A. Elias, Ed.): Encyclopedia of Quaternary Studies, p. 1547–1566, doi: 10.1016/B0-44-452747-8/00290-8.Erickson, J.M., and Platt Jr, R.B., In press, Orbatid Mite Studies (S. A. Elias, Ed.): Encyclopedia of Quaternary Studies, 2nd Edition.Erickson, J.M., Platt Jr, R.B., and Jennings, D.H., 2003, Holocene fossil oribatid mite biofacies as proxies of palaeohabitat at the Hiscock site, Byron, New York: Bulletin of the Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, v. 37, p. 176–189.Erickson, J.M., and Solod, A., 2007, Recognition of postglacial cold intervals by quantitative biozontation of fossil oribatid mites, in Morales-Malacara, J.B., Behan-Pelletier, V., Ueckermann, E., Perez, T.M., Estrada, E., Gidpert, C., and Badii, M. eds., Acarology XI: Proceedings of the INternational Congress, International Congress of Acarology, Instituto de Biologia, UNAM; Facultad de Ciencias, UNAM; Sociedad Latinoamericana de Acarologia, Mexico, p. 9–16.Erickson, J.M., and Waugh, D.A., 2002, Colony morphologies and missed opportunities during the Cincinnatian (Late Ordovician) bryozoan radiation: examples from Heterotrypa frondosa and Monticulipora, in Jackson, P.N.W., Buttler, C.J., and Jones, M.E.S. eds., Bryozoan Studies 2001: Proceedings of the 12th International Bryozoology Association Conference, AA Balkema Publishers, Lisse, The Netherlands, p. 101–108.Hoganson, J.W., and Erickson, J.M., 2005, A New Species of Ischyodus (Chondrichthyes: Holocephali: Callorhynchidae) From Upper Maastrichtian Shallow Marine Facies of the Fox Hills and Hell Creek Formations, Williston Basin, North Dakota, USA: Palaeontology, v. 48, no. 4, p. 709–721, doi: 10.1111/j.1475-4983.2005.00475.x.Page 11
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREHoganson, J.W., Erickson, J.M., and Holland Jr., F.D., 2007, Approaches to Provenance Expand Amphibian, reptilian, and avian remains from the Fox Hills Formation (Maastrichtian): Shoreline and estuarine deposits of the Pierre Sea in south-central North Dakota, in Martin, J.E. and Parris, D.C. eds., The Geology and Paleontology of the Late Cretaceous Marine Deposits of the Dakotas, Geological Society of America Special Paper 427, Geological Society of America, p. 239–256.Holland Jr, F.D., and Erickson., J.M., 1969, Paleontology Can Be Fun!: Earth Science Curriculum Project Newsletter, v. 21, p. 1–2.Holland Jr., F.D., Erickson, J.M., and O’Brien, D.E., 1975, Casterolimulus: a new Late Cretaceous generic link in Limulid lineage: Bulletins of American Paleontology, v. 67, no. 287, p. 235–249.Klett, M.C., and Erickson, J.M., 1976, Type and Reference Sections for a new Member of the Fox Hills Formation, Upper Cretaceous (Maestrichtian), in the Missouri Valley Region, North and South Dakota: North Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, v. 28, no. 2, p. 3–21.Klett, M.C., and Erickson, J.M., 1974, Type and reference sections for a new member of the Fox Hills Fm., Cretaceous, South Central North Dakota: Proceedings of the North Dakota Academy of Science, v. 28, p. 17.Peppe, D.J., Erickson, J.M., and Hickey, L.J., 2007, Fossil leaf species from the Fox Hills Formation (Upper Cretaceous: North Dakota, USA) and their paleogeographic significance: Journal of Paleontology, v. 81, no. 3, p. 550–567, doi: 10.1666/05067.1.Peppe, D.J., Royer, D.L., Cariglino, B., Oliver, S.Y., Newman, S., Leight, E., Enikolopov, G., Fernandez- Burgos, M., Herrera, F., Adams, J.M., Correa, E., Currano, E.D., Erickson, J.M., Hinojosa, L.F., et al., 2011, Sensitivity of leaf size and shape to climate: global patterns and paleoclimatic applications.: The New Phytologist, v. 190, no. 3, p. 724–39, doi: 10.1111/j.1469- 8137.2010.03615.x.Stone, W.J., and Erickson, J.M., 1970, A FORTRAN program for Folk’s sandstone classification: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 47, no. 3, p. 163–168.Waugh, D.A., and Erickson, J.M., 2002, Functional morphology of the anastomosing frondose growth form reported in Heterotrypa frondosa (d’Orbigny) (Bryozoa: Trepostomata) from the Cincinnatian (Late Ordovician) of Ohio., in Jackson, P.N.W., Buttler, C.J., and Jones, M.E.S. eds., Bryozoan Studies 2001: Proceedings of the 12th International Bryozoology Association Conference, AA Balkema Publishers, Lisse, The Netherlands, p. 331–338.Waugh, D.A., Erickson, J.M., and Crawford, R.S., 2004, Two growth forms of Heterotrypa Nicholson, 1879 (Bryozoa, Trepostomata) from the type-Cincinnatian; putting the pieces back together: Compass of Sigma Gamma Epsilon, v. 78, no. 3, p. 97–112. Page 12
  • THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF DR. J. MARK ERICKSON TO THE GEOLOGICAL LITERATUREAdditional Works CitedBörner, K., Klavans, R., Patek, M., Zoss, A.M., Biberstine, J.R., Light, R.P., Larivière, V., and Boyack, K.W., 2012, Design and update of a classification system: the UCSD map of science.: PloS one, v. 7, no. 7, p. e39464, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0039464.Gingras, Y., Larivière, V., Macaluso, B., and Robitaille, J.-P., 2008, The effects of aging on researchers’ publication and citation patterns.: PloS one, v. 3, no. 12, p. e4048, doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0004048.Katkin, W., 2003, The Boyer Commission Report and its Impact on Undergraduate Research: New Directions for Teaching and Learning, v. 2003, no. 93, p. 19–38, doi: 10.1002/tl.86.Priem, J., Taraborelli, D., Groth, P., and Neylon, C., 2011, altmetrics: a manifesto, http://altmetrics.org/manifesto/. Accessed October 2, 2012.Sci2 Team. (2009). Science of Science (Sci2) Tool. Indiana University and SciTech Strategies, http://sci2.cns.iu.edu. Accessed October 2, 2012.Yang, K., and Meho, L.I., 2006, Citation Analysis: A Comparison of Google Scholar, Scopus, and Web of Science: Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, v. 43, no. 1, p. 1–15, doi: 10.1002/meet.14504301185.Page 13