Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare

  • 1,256 views
Uploaded on

Presentation given at American Library Association 2014 Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV. June 29, 2014 …

Presentation given at American Library Association 2014 Annual Conference, Las Vegas, NV. June 29, 2014

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
1,256
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
7

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. LEARNINGWITHGAMES IN MEDICINEANDHEALTHCARE Bohyun Kim Associate Director, Library Systems and Knowledge Applications University of Maryland, Baltimore, HS/HSL @bohyunkim | http://bohyunkim.net Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/bohyunkim/ala2014-game-ig American Library Association 2014 Annual Conference, LasVegas, NV. June 29, 2014
  • 2. Gameas aPedagogicalTool • How effective are games in helping people in acquiring knowledge and skills that are difficult to obtain, rather than in pursuing sensory stimulation and fun? • Chapter (9): Bohyun Kim, “Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare and the Potential Role of Libraries,” in Games in Libraries: Essays onUsing Play to Connect and Instruct., edited by Breanne Kirsch, McFarland, 2014. pp. 152-170.
  • 3. EducationalGame in Medicine • = Serious game • = Edutainment • = Game-based learning • = Digital game-based learning • An educational game is an attempt to enhance students’ experience and learning outcomes by applying the gaming elements and mechanisms to instruction. • Medicine and healthcare have been the early adopters of game-based learning.
  • 4. Reception& PedagogicalEfficacy • Students and practitioners in health sciences and healthcare find games appealing. (Also patients) • Games appear to have a positive impact on the students’ perceptions of and attitudes towards a subject studied. • Games generally enhance student enjoyment and may improve long-term retention of information. • More methodically rigorous studies (RCTs) are necessary to properly assess the effectiveness of games in comparison to traditional lecture method.
  • 5. Designingthe‘Flow’experience • Fully immersed in activities with a feeling of energized focus, full involvement, and enjoyment in the process of the activity. (- Mihály Csíkszentmihályi) • Control, task, feedback, improvement, progress • Usability • Logistics (Support of instructors) • Not all serious games in medicine and health sciences are technologically sophisticated or graphically elaborate like many popular commercial video games. • Social element
  • 6. Variables foraGame’sPedagogicalEfficacy • Types of a game • Arcade – visual processing, speed of response • Adventure – Narrative-driven open-learning with hypothesis testing and problem solving • Simulation – motor skills • RPG - stragety • Jeopardy, board, card, … etc. • Content of learning • Level of learning • Types of a student
  • 7. ChallengesinGamification • Is the aspect of classroom/library experience in question suitable for gamification? • Is the resulting game experience something the target group would enjoy? • What is the ultimate goal of gamifying this particular aspect of classroom/library experience? • What are the logistical needs that should be met to ensure the success of your gamification project?
  • 8. ControversyaboutGamificationRewards • Intrinsic vs. extrinsic motivation • How to channel motivation into meaning? • Example: Andrew Agassi from Game Frame by Aaron Dignan
  • 9. Importanceof Execution • Gamification alone does not guarantee student engagement or learning. • A clear goal, careful planning, and skillful execution are necessary for the success of a gamification project. • More research is needed about how and when to best use games to improve instructional outcomes and motivation.
  • 10. Moreinformationandbibliography • See the book chapter. Chapter (9): Bohyun Kim, “Learning with Games in Medicine and Healthcare and the Potential Role of Libraries,” in Games in Libraries: Essays onUsing Play to Connect and Instruct., edited by Breanne Kirsch, McFarland, 2014. pp. 152-170. • http://books.google.com/books?id=XV WoAgAAQBAJ&lpg=PA1&ots=CP4Ml mfe9Q&pg=PA152#v=onepage&q&f=f alse (Google Books)
  • 11. Questions? Tally, the cat-like husky. Source: http://imgur.com/a/0KoeX