Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Training Teachers As Researchers in Adult and Non-Formal Education

1,112

Published on

Presentation by Alan Rogers at UEA

Presentation by Alan Rogers at UEA

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
1,112
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
12
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. TRAINING OF TEACHERS AS RESEARCHERS IN ADULT AND NON-FORMAL EDUCATION LETTER: Learning for Empowerment Through Training in Ethnographic-style Research
  • 2. ORIGINS <ul><li>Coming together of </li></ul><ul><li>a) adult education </li></ul><ul><li>b) New Literacy Studies/ethnography </li></ul>
  • 3. TEACHING ADULTS <ul><li>“ Start where they are” </li></ul><ul><li>Usually done in ag-ext but not in health, literacy-numeracy and other adult programmes </li></ul><ul><li>No training in how to find out </li></ul>
  • 4. LIMITATION OF TRADITIONAL APPROACHES <ul><li>Choose sample </li></ul><ul><li>Ask questions </li></ul><ul><li>Accept answers (triangulation) </li></ul><ul><li>Draw conclusions </li></ul><ul><li>Sample taken to be typical </li></ul><ul><li>They are our questions </li></ul><ul><li>Cannot often answer (unconscious learning) </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusions need to be tested: (“when not true?”) </li></ul>
  • 5. ETHNOGRAPHICAL APPROACHES <ul><li>Move from skills to practices (in agric-ext; also health etc; but rarely in literacy/numeracy) </li></ul><ul><li>telling case studies </li></ul><ul><li>look through their eyes </li></ul><ul><li>observation (espoused theories vs theories in practice) </li></ul><ul><li>can gain general conclusions but not necessarily typical. </li></ul>
  • 6. THE DELHI PROGRAMME <ul><li>Approach from Nirantar 2000 – gap between home and school epistemologies </li></ul><ul><li>The participants </li></ul><ul><li>The resource persons </li></ul><ul><li>The funding </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop 1 – Ethnography (practicum) </li></ul><ul><li>Research projects </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop 2 – revise and application </li></ul><ul><li>No workshop 3 </li></ul><ul><li>Publication – Exploring the Everyday </li></ul>
  • 7.  
  • 8. THE ETHIOPIAN PROGRAMME <ul><li>Approach from ANFEAE </li></ul><ul><li>They raised funds </li></ul><ul><li>The participants </li></ul><ul><li>The resource persons </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop 1 – Ethnography with practicum (report) </li></ul><ul><li>Research Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop 2 – Ethnography Guidelines </li></ul><ul><li>Research Projects and training event </li></ul><ul><li>Workshop 3 – Building findings into learning programmes </li></ul>
  • 9. WORKSHOP 1
  • 10. WORKSHOP 2
  • 11. PLANNED OUTCOMES <ul><li>Publication in three parts: </li></ul><ul><li>a) What is ethnographical approach?; why is it important? how do we do it? </li></ul><ul><li>b) Case studies </li></ul><ul><li>c) Implications of findings for our teaching programmes </li></ul><ul><li>Group of trainers to cascade </li></ul><ul><li>We hope to get there!!!! </li></ul>
  • 12. ONE CASE STUDY <ul><li>MICRO-CREDIT SCHEME: four women traders </li></ul><ul><li>a) two women combined </li></ul><ul><li>multiple occupations, not just one (banana selling; araki; cloth selling) </li></ul><ul><li>place of religion </li></ul><ul><li>secrecy (banana selling) </li></ul><ul><li>no role for formal literacy/numeracy </li></ul><ul><li>b) one woman (cheka; sheep) </li></ul><ul><li>c) one woman </li></ul><ul><li>loss of funds; sale of cow </li></ul><ul><li>now selling pepper and salt </li></ul><ul><li>disillusion </li></ul><ul><li>What are implications of this for our non-formal education programmes? </li></ul>
  • 13. ONE CASE STUDY

×