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Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
Chapter 12
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Chapter 12

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Transcript

  • 1. Chapter 12 Human Technology Interface
  • 2. Human–Technology Interfaces Examples – EMR – Defibrillator – patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) pump – Drug administration system – any number of physiologic monitoring systems – electronic thermometers – and, of course, telephones and pagers.
  • 3. Human–Technology Interface Any time a human uses technology, there is some type of hardware and/or software that enables and supports the interaction.
  • 4. Workarounds • Circumvent troublesome technology • Are bandaids • Do not fix the problem • Could put the patient at risk
  • 5. Telehealth Uses telecommunication and videoconferencing software to communicate more effectively and more frequently with patients at home by using the technology to monitor patients’ vital signs, supervise their wound care, or demonstrate a procedure.
  • 6. Telehealth Interfaces Allow patients to interact with a virtual clinician (actually a computer program) that will ask questions, provide social support, and tailor education to identify patient needs based on the answers to screening questions
  • 7. Telehealth Interfaces These human–technology interfaces have been remarkably successful; sometimes patients prefer them to live clinicians!
  • 8. Human Technology Interface Problems The major cause of up to 87% of all patient monitoring incidents. It is not always that technology is faulty. Technology may perform flawlessly, but interface design may lead human user to make errors (Vicente, 2004).
  • 9. Technology Should Fit 5 Levels of Human Requirements 1. Physical 2. Psychological 3. Team 4. Organizational 5. Political
  • 10. Analysis Tools and Techniques • Task-analysis • Cognitive task analysis (CTA) • Cognitive work analysts (CWA)
  • 11. Involve the users • Focus group • Cognitive walkthrough • Heuristic evaluation • Formal usability test • Field study
  • 12. FITT Model • Fit between Individuals, Tasks, and Technology that • Suggests that each of these factors be considered in designing and evaluating human-technology interfaces
  • 13. Doctors Vs. Nurses • Doctors and nurses describe patient information differently – doctors emphasized diagnosis, treatment and management; – nurses emphasized functional issues.
  • 14. Issues Associated with Wearable Technology The human-technology interface must address: • How will people use this technology? • How will they behave with it on their person? • How will they wear it? • How and when will they enable and use it? • Will others be able to detect the technology?
  • 15. In the Ideal World • Every human-technology interface will be – designed to enhance users’ workflow – as easy to use as ATM machines – fully tested prior to its implementation in a setting that mirrors the setting where it will be used

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