Respond, Reuse, Recycle  BarCamps to CrisisCamps to Random Hacks - learning how to crowdsource efficiently
Crisis Information Crowdsourcers <ul><li>Crowd Informers </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><li>Ushahidi  </li>...
CrisisCommons, RHOK, AIC, Communities <ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-day CrisisCamps, projects and ‘evergre...
Community Roots <ul><li>Barcamp.org </li></ul><ul><li>ad-hoc gathering born from the desire for people to share and learn ...
How it all started... <ul><li>2004 onwards: OpenStreetMap and other tools being used in US, UK...  </li></ul><ul><li>Late ...
How Haiti Changed Everything <ul><li>Late 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>First CrisisCamp spawns RHOK and Aid Information Challeng...
What makes a suitable Crisis? <ul><li>Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too little information: Haiti maps </li></ul></ul><ul><...
CrisisCommons.org
Crisis Commons “ Local volunteering for global crisis management and disaster relief” <ul><li>Global grassroots network  <...
What does a CrisisCamp do? <ul><li>Connects peoples’ skills & time to improve crisis information tools and responses </li>...
Haiti Earthquake <ul><li>Earthquake January 12th 2010  </li></ul><ul><li>Response within hours: CrisisCamps around the wor...
Haiti CrisisCamps
CrisisCamp London
Handling “too little information”: Maps
Handling “too little information” <ul><li>Telecommunications team  </li></ul><ul><li>We Have, We Need </li></ul><ul><li>&q...
Handling “too much information” <ul><li>People Finder </li></ul><ul><li>A single place to look: who’s missing, who’s looki...
Moving from “them and us” <ul><li>Empowering anyone with a phone to report and request information </li></ul><ul><li>Haiti...
Other Crisis Responses since January <ul><li>Chile Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons Chile team responded </li></...
Preparing for the Future <ul><li>Helping CDAC </li></ul><ul><li>Website reviews and prototypes </li></ul><ul><li>Helping U...
CrisisCommons Lessons Learnt <ul><li>In the beginning was organised chaos: 30 camps, 8 countries, 5 languages, 2000 camper...
CrisisCommons Lessons Learnt <ul><li>Not all projects made it.  Common causes were: </li></ul><ul><li>No end user buy-in. ...
RHOK.org
Round the World Twice in 47 Hours...
What RHOK reused from CrisisCommons <ul><li>Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Created RHOK project specifications for real-life N...
What RHOK reused from RHOK <ul><li>RHOK0 to RHOK 1 - People Finder </li></ul><ul><li>Country to country - Turquilt, People...
What RHOK gave back <ul><li>Tools for Haiti </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PeopleFinder tool was built in RHOK0 </li></ul></ul><ul>...
What still needs to be done? <ul><li>Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Big gaps in NGO coordination and situation awareness </li></u...
What Next for the Communities? <ul><li>CrisisCongress 15th July 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: CrisisCamps to prepare people...
How to get involved <ul><li>Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>join the mailing lists </li><...
The End <ul><li>Points to take away </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not “us and them” anymore, it’s “us and us” </li></ul><ul><li>Y...
Volunteer Skills <ul><li>Programming </li></ul><ul><li>Telecommunications </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>User...
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Reuse between crisiscamp and rhok

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Talk given at IT4Communities seminar on reuse between Crisis Commons and Random Hacks of Kindness, October 2010.

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  • Crisis Camp London
  • Crisis Camp London
  • Reuse between crisiscamp and rhok

    1. 1. Respond, Reuse, Recycle BarCamps to CrisisCamps to Random Hacks - learning how to crowdsource efficiently
    2. 2. Crisis Information Crowdsourcers <ul><li>Crowd Informers </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><li>Ushahidi </li></ul><ul><li>Sahana </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap </li></ul><ul><li>Louisiana Bucket Brigade </li></ul><ul><li>Swift River </li></ul><ul><li>The Extraordinaries </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisMappers.net </li></ul><ul><li>NGO/Local Coordinators </li></ul><ul><li>UNOCHA - reliefweb </li></ul><ul><li>CDAC </li></ul><ul><li>Diaspora </li></ul><ul><li>Crowd Tool Developers </li></ul><ul><li>RHOK </li></ul><ul><li>Aid Information Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>ICT4Peace </li></ul><ul><li>Ushahidi </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap </li></ul><ul><li>Sahana </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><li>InSTEDD </li></ul>
    3. 3. CrisisCommons, RHOK, AIC, Communities <ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1-day CrisisCamps, projects and ‘evergreens’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continous information support to major crises, e.g. Haiti </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Information support and tools for current crises, e.g. oil spill </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparation for future crises </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Random Hacks of Kindness and Aid Information Challenge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1 or 2 day hackathons </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RHOK = competition to create the ‘best’ crisis response software </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>AIC = creating audit trail for UK/UN/World Bank aid funding </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OSM, Sahana, Ushahidi </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous opensource development communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Software and information (e.g. maps) for aid and crisis response </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Community Roots <ul><li>Barcamp.org </li></ul><ul><li>ad-hoc gathering born from the desire for people to share and learn in an open environment. </li></ul><ul><li>intense event with discussions, demos and interaction from participants who are the main actors of the event </li></ul><ul><li>Hackathon </li></ul><ul><li>“ collaborative computer programming… many people come together to hack on what they want to, how they want to - with little to no restrictions on direction or goal of the programming” </li></ul><ul><li>Agile open-source development </li></ul>
    5. 5. How it all started... <ul><li>2004 onwards: OpenStreetMap and other tools being used in US, UK... </li></ul><ul><li>Late 2004: Sahana developed in Sri Lanka after Indian Ocean Tsunami. Then used in Pakistan, Philippines, Indonesia... </li></ul><ul><li>2008: Ushahidi developed in Kenya to map citizen journalist reports of violence after Kenyan elections. Then used in South Africa, DR Congo, Gaza, India, Pakistan… </li></ul><ul><li>June 2009: CrisisCommons founded in Washington DC after a tweetup by a group of technologists and communications professionals who wanted to use their skills to help prepare for and react to crisis situations – both at home and around the world </li></ul><ul><li>2009: CDAC formed after a discussion in a bar... </li></ul>
    6. 6. How Haiti Changed Everything <ul><li>Late 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>First CrisisCamp spawns RHOK and Aid Information Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>RHOK0 produces People Finder </li></ul><ul><li>First Aid Information Challenge - overseas aid data starts to be available </li></ul><ul><li>UN, CDAC, CrisisCommons etc all plan to develop information strategies and crisis response communities during 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Jan 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Haiti earthquake. Everyone ‘just does it’ </li></ul><ul><li>Massive and coordinated crowdsourced response - lives saved through tweets, texts and up-to-date maps </li></ul><ul><li>Massive not-very-coordinated on-the-ground response </li></ul><ul><li>June 2010 - Reflection and consolidation. Collecting lessons learnt and working out where to go from here. </li></ul>
    7. 7. What makes a suitable Crisis? <ul><li>Issues </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Too little information: Haiti maps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Too much information: Tweak the Tweet </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Local infrastructure is overwhelmed: People Finder </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Some information channels exist: SMS, USBs to Haiti </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Stages </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mitigation: landslide predictor </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Preparedness: OSM worldwide </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Response: Ushahidi </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recovery: Haiti Amps Network </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. CrisisCommons.org
    9. 9. Crisis Commons “ Local volunteering for global crisis management and disaster relief” <ul><li>Global grassroots network </li></ul><ul><li>of technology professionals, domain experts, translators and first responders </li></ul><ul><li>collaborating </li></ul><ul><li>to improve technology and practice </li></ul><ul><li>for humanitarian crisis management and disaster relief </li></ul>
    10. 10. What does a CrisisCamp do? <ul><li>Connects peoples’ skills & time to improve crisis information tools and responses </li></ul><ul><li>This supports: </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis affected communities </li></ul><ul><li>Organisations in the field (international NGOs, local organisations) </li></ul><ul><li>Crisis communities (Ushahidi, OpenStreetMap, Sahana etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Organisations in the space (mapping, telecomms etc) </li></ul><ul><li>A CrisisCamp links people who want to help with places that they can </li></ul>
    11. 11. Haiti Earthquake <ul><li>Earthquake January 12th 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Response within hours: CrisisCamps around the world </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, Sahana, CrisisCommons, NGOs, Haitian diaspora, Haitians working together </li></ul>
    12. 12. Haiti CrisisCamps
    13. 13. CrisisCamp London
    14. 14. Handling “too little information”: Maps
    15. 15. Handling “too little information” <ul><li>Telecommunications team </li></ul><ul><li>We Have, We Need </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Craigslist&quot; of self-identified needs and requests by non-profits assisting in Haiti relief operations </li></ul><ul><li>Built in days </li></ul><ul><li>Biggest moment: getting generator fuel to a hospital 20 minutes after they tweeted for help </li></ul><ul><li>Haiti Hospital Capacity Finder </li></ul><ul><li>Listed free beds in field hospitals </li></ul>
    16. 16. Handling “too much information” <ul><li>People Finder </li></ul><ul><li>A single place to look: who’s missing, who’s looking </li></ul><ul><li>Input from databases, SMS, tweets, info handed to NGOs </li></ul><ul><li>Information for Radio Broadcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Searching for and organising news about Haiti </li></ul><ul><li>Tweak the Tweet </li></ul><ul><li>Adding tweet codes for data miners, e.g. Sahana </li></ul>
    17. 17. Moving from “them and us” <ul><li>Empowering anyone with a phone to report and request information </li></ul><ul><li>Haiti project 4636 - SMS to volunteer to Ushahidi link </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting translators and local coordinators </li></ul><ul><li>Language project and Haitian Diaspora </li></ul><ul><li>Reconnecting local information infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Information for Radio Broadcast </li></ul><ul><li>Karl and Carel’s Project </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting low-bandwidth users to global information sources </li></ul><ul><li>Low-bandwidth ReliefWeb projects </li></ul><ul><li>Low-bandwidth Ushahidi </li></ul><ul><li>Low-bandwidth CDAC </li></ul>
    18. 18. Other Crisis Responses since January <ul><li>Chile Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons Chile team responded </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons Argentina and Columbia helped </li></ul><ul><li>China Earthquake </li></ul><ul><li>Chinese Diaspora responded with camps and translation </li></ul><ul><li>US Oil Spill </li></ul><ul><li>Louisiana Bucket Brigade used Ushahidi instance </li></ul><ul><li>US team developed Oil Reporter app </li></ul><ul><li>Icelandic Ash Cloud </li></ul><ul><li>UK team started news and twitter watches </li></ul><ul><li>Other response watches - quakes, floods, tsunamis, fires </li></ul>
    19. 19. Preparing for the Future <ul><li>Helping CDAC </li></ul><ul><li>Website reviews and prototypes </li></ul><ul><li>Helping UNOCHA </li></ul><ul><li>Reliefweb reviews and low-bandwidth prototypes </li></ul><ul><li>Populating CrisisWiki and OpenStreetMap </li></ul><ul><li>Information useful for crisis responders </li></ul><ul><li>Helping Tool Communities </li></ul><ul><li>SahanaPy and Ushahidi software development </li></ul>
    20. 20. CrisisCommons Lessons Learnt <ul><li>In the beginning was organised chaos: 30 camps, 8 countries, 5 languages, 2000 campers, 10000 translators, one project list and one country in serious trouble. </li></ul><ul><li>Camps picked projects from the list - which emptied quickly. </li></ul><ul><li>People redid map sections because the updated areas weren’t tagged. </li></ul><ul><li>Real-time coordination was difficult across timezones and languages: we needed a dedicated operations centre but didn’t know what it was. </li></ul><ul><li>The virtual camp was difficult to maintain without a dedicated leader. </li></ul><ul><li>Timezones confuse almost everyone. A simple “what time is it in” spreadsheet saves a lot of pain and missed-by-an-hour meetings. </li></ul>
    21. 21. CrisisCommons Lessons Learnt <ul><li>Not all projects made it. Common causes were: </li></ul><ul><li>No end user buy-in. You can build it, but they won’t come if you don’t involve them. Especially true for local communities. </li></ul><ul><li>No team, or no team buy-in. Leadership matters, and projects need both people and management. </li></ul><ul><li>Short-term team. It’s difficult to sustain long-term development when the adrenalin wears off, and people will drift away. </li></ul>
    22. 22. RHOK.org
    23. 23. Round the World Twice in 47 Hours...
    24. 24. What RHOK reused from CrisisCommons <ul><li>Projects </li></ul><ul><li>Created RHOK project specifications for real-life NGO and local problems </li></ul><ul><li>Reused CrisisCommons project experts, e.g. Haiti Amps Network </li></ul><ul><li>Reused connected to provide subject matter experts </li></ul><ul><li>Community </li></ul><ul><li>Reused CrisisCommons experience as a template for RHOK </li></ul><ul><li>Reused CrisisCamp organisers for RHOKs in Sydney, Washington etc </li></ul><ul><li>Infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Reused CrisisCommons structure for RHOK wikisite: built in 1 day </li></ul><ul><li>Ran continuous operations centre watching RHOK information feeds </li></ul><ul><li>Reused CrisisCommons experience in world wide projects, camps, experts coordination centre </li></ul>
    25. 25. What RHOK reused from RHOK <ul><li>RHOK0 to RHOK 1 - People Finder </li></ul><ul><li>Country to country - Turquilt, People Finder, wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Team to team </li></ul>
    26. 26. What RHOK gave back <ul><li>Tools for Haiti </li></ul><ul><ul><li>PeopleFinder tool was built in RHOK0 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Help with aerial imaging problems </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not enough high-res data for OpenStreetMaps </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OilSpill data explosion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turquilt project: UAV video mosaicing solution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Help with CrisisCamp Projects </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nairobi effort and expertise on Haiti Amps Network </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Tool innovation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Landslide prediction software </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. What still needs to be done? <ul><li>Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Big gaps in NGO coordination and situation awareness </li></ul><ul><li>Preparation </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMaps for crisis-prone areas </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisWiki entries for everywhere </li></ul><ul><li>Organisation </li></ul><ul><li>How to efficiently build and maintain the tools needed in future crises </li></ul><ul><li>Without stifling innovation and the OpenSource spirit </li></ul><ul><li>How to keep this local but global </li></ul>
    28. 28. What Next for the Communities? <ul><li>CrisisCongress 15th July 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: CrisisCamps to prepare people for local crises </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: continue monthly London CrisisCamps </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: expand “3 hour tasks” list in VirtualCrisisCamp </li></ul><ul><li>RHOK 2.0 - London as the lead city </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: RHOK as the ideas generator for CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><li>Idea: CrisisCommons as the crisis tool user/ maintainer </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, Sahana etc </li></ul><ul><li>Are already going global </li></ul>
    29. 29. How to get involved <ul><li>Volunteers </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons </li></ul><ul><ul><li>join the mailing lists </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>go to a real camp </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>join the virtual camp </li></ul></ul><ul><li>RHOK </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sign up for RHOK 2.0 this winter </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, Sahana etc </li></ul><ul><ul><li>see http://wiki.crisiscommons.org/wiki/Other_Crisis_Relief_Communities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Organisations </li></ul><ul><li>CrisisCommons: email [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>RHOK: email RHOK </li></ul><ul><li>OpenStreetMap, Ushahidi, Sahana etc: see link above </li></ul>
    30. 30. The End <ul><li>Points to take away </li></ul><ul><li>It’s not “us and them” anymore, it’s “us and us” </li></ul><ul><li>You can help - or hinder - from anywhere. Your choice: </li></ul><ul><li>Getting the right information to the right people at the right time saves lives </li></ul><ul><li>Overwhelming people with information doesn’t </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes your tech skills can help people you’ll never meet, immediately and in ways you couldn’t imagine </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes it takes longer, but it’s no less valuable </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you for listening </li></ul><ul><li>Any questions? </li></ul>
    31. 31. Volunteer Skills <ul><li>Programming </li></ul><ul><li>Telecommunications </li></ul><ul><li>Mapping </li></ul><ul><li>User Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Communications & PR </li></ul><ul><li>Translation </li></ul><ul><li>Local knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Relief work experience </li></ul><ul><li>IT project management </li></ul><ul><li>Facilitation and admin </li></ul><ul><li>Making tea! </li></ul>

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