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African American Artists <ul><li>Chapter 36:  </li></ul><ul><li>Identity and Liberation </li></ul>Copyright, 1996 © Dale C...
Challenge questions: <ul><ul><li>What issues of “identity and liberation” are reflected in each painting. </li></ul></ul><...
Quest for Racial Equality <ul><li>End of slavery in the United States </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1863 Lincoln’s Emancipation Pr...
Quest for Racial Equality <ul><li>1920s New York Harlem Renaissance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brook...
Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>The Migration Series, Panel No. 57: “The female worker was also one of the last groups to leave the...
Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>The Studio, 1977 </li></ul>
Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>Harriet Tubman, 1939-1940 </li></ul>
Lawrence:  Migration of the Negro, 1940-1941
Lawrence:  &quot;They were very poor“  1940-41
Robert Colescott <ul><li>A Stroll Through the Neighborhood, 1976 </li></ul>
John Biggers  (b. 1924) <ul><li>The Upper Room ,  1984. Lithograph,  </li></ul><ul><li>4' x 2' 11&quot; </li></ul>
African-American Women Artists <ul><li>&quot;Despite over three hundred years of racial, sexual, and economic oppression, ...
Marie Johnson-Calloway (b. 1920) <ul><li>Hope Street: Church Mothers , 1984.  </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed media, 4' x 7' 6&quo...
<ul><li>Jean Lacy,  Noah (Bert Williams/Bill &quot;Bojangles&quot; Robinson) , 1986, animated music box. Source:  Bearing ...
Betye Saar  (b. 1926) <ul><li>Nine Mojo Secrets,  1971 </li></ul><ul><li>Visit  Betye   Saar’s  homepage </li></ul>
Betye Saar <ul><li>Liberation of Aunt Jemima&quot; 1972  </li></ul>
<ul><li>Charnelle Holloway,  Fertility Belt for the Career Woman  , I995, Repoussé  akua ba  doll, sterling silver, bronze...
<ul><li>Varnette P. Honeywood,  The Caregiver,  1995, acrylic on canvas, courtesy of the artist. Source:  Bearing Witness ...
<ul><li>Beverly Buchanan,  Blue Lightning , 1995, oil pastel on paper, Source:  Bearing Witness </li></ul>
<ul><li>Betye Saar,  Watching , 1995, mixed media on metal, 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches.  Collection of the artist. Source:  Bea...
<ul><li>Carolyn Mazloomi,  The Ancestors Speak to Me.  Contemporary Quilt with African textiles, 2002.  Source:  African A...
Sources... <ul><li>Mark Harden,  The  Artchive </li></ul><ul><li>California Africa-American Art Museum  </li></ul><ul><li>...
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Pp Ch36 Liberation

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  • Source: Mark Hardin Artchive Lawrence, Jacob The Migration Series, Panel No. 57: &amp;quot;The female worker was also one of the last groups to leave the South&amp;quot; 1940-41 Tempera on masonite 18 x 12 in. (45.7 x 30.5 cm) The Phillips Collection, Washington
  • Source: ArtsEdNet http://www.getty.edu/artsednet/resources/jacoblawrence/index.htm Jacob Lawrence United States, 1917-2000 The Studio 1977 Gouache on paper 22 x 30 in. Partial gift of Gull Industries; John H. and Ann Hauberg; Links, Seattle; and gift by exchange from the estate of Mark Tobey; Seattle Art Museum Photo credit: Paul Macapia
  • Source: ArtsEdNet http://www.getty.edu/artsednet/resources/jacoblawrence/index.htm Jacob Lawrence United States, 1917-2000 Harriet Tubman series, no. 7 Harriet Tubman worked as water girl to field hands. She also worked at plowing, carting, and hauling logs. 1939-1940 Casein tempera on gessoed hardboard 12 x 17 7/8 in. Gift of the Harmon Foundation, Hampton University Museum Hampton, Virginia
  • Source: ArtsEdNet http://www.getty.edu/artsednet/resources/jacoblawrence/index.htm Jacob Lawrence United States, 1917-2000 The Migration of the Negro, Panel no. 1 During the World War there was a great migration North by Southern Negroes. 1940-1941 Casein tempera on hardboard panel 18 x 12 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1942
  • Source: Mark Hardin Artchive Lawrence, Jacob The Migration Series, Panel No. 10: &amp;quot;They were very poor&amp;quot; 1940-41 Tempera on gesso on composition board 12 x 18 in. (30.5 x 45.7 cm) The Museum of Modern Art, New York
  • Robert Colescott, &amp;quot;A Stroll Through the Neighborhood&amp;quot; 1976 Source: http://www.caam.ca.gov/edu/glass.html#colescott
  • John Biggers The Upper Room John Biggers African American (b. 1924) The Upper Room , 1984 Lithograph, 4&apos; x 2&apos; 11&amp;quot; Collection of the California Afro-American Museum Foundation © California Afro-American Museum Foundation
  • http://www.getty.edu/artsednet/resources/Maps/hope.html Hope Street: Church Mothers, 1984 Marie Johnson-Calloway African American (b. 1920) Hope Street: Church Mothers , 1984, Mixed media, 4&apos; x 7&apos; 6&amp;quot; x 5&amp;quot; Collection of the California Afro-American Museum Foundation © California Afro-American Museum Foundation
  • http://www.caam.ca.gov/edu/perm/saar.html Source: California Africa American Museum Many African American artists make references to ancestors from distant history. In this piece, Saar has chosen to include a photograph of a group of Nuba boys. They are covered with ash, and performing an initiation rite. Even though these youngsters are not actual ancestors of the artist, Saar plays with the idea of Africans as ancestors of all African Americans. In addition to the photograph, the artist adds objects and symbols with evocative power, such as the all-seeing eye, the hand, the lion with the human skull, the Gelede mask, the phases of the moon, the feathers, the skeletons and the hair-like fibers. With all these objects, the artist pays homage to different belief systems and, therefore, ways of seeing the world.   
  • http://www.caam.ca.gov/edu/perm/saar.html Source: Liberation of Aunt Jemima&amp;quot; 1972 Betye Saar b. 1926 African-American
  • Transcript of "Pp Ch36 Liberation"

    1. 1. African American Artists <ul><li>Chapter 36: </li></ul><ul><li>Identity and Liberation </li></ul>Copyright, 1996 © Dale Carnegie & Associates, Inc. Humanities 103 Instructor Beth Camp
    2. 2. Challenge questions: <ul><ul><li>What issues of “identity and liberation” are reflected in each painting. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the link between “cultural identity” and “history”? </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Quest for Racial Equality <ul><li>End of slavery in the United States </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1863 Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1865 13 th Amendment to the Constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jim Crow laws set segregation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Race riots protested segregation, unequal education, restricted jobs, ghetto housing, exclusion from voting, and government services </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1919 25 cities “bloody summer” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1960s to present </li></ul></ul>
    4. 4. Quest for Racial Equality <ul><li>1920s New York Harlem Renaissance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Langston Hughes, Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Wright </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Civil Rights Act of 1964: Desegregation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Martin Luther King, Jr. “I Have a Dream” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Malcolm X, Black Islam movement </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1970s Black Revolution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Toni Morrison, Alice Walker </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>The Migration Series, Panel No. 57: “The female worker was also one of the last groups to leave the South&quot; 1940-41 </li></ul>
    6. 6. Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>The Studio, 1977 </li></ul>
    7. 7. Jacob Lawrence <ul><li>Harriet Tubman, 1939-1940 </li></ul>
    8. 8. Lawrence: Migration of the Negro, 1940-1941
    9. 9. Lawrence: &quot;They were very poor“ 1940-41
    10. 10. Robert Colescott <ul><li>A Stroll Through the Neighborhood, 1976 </li></ul>
    11. 11. John Biggers (b. 1924) <ul><li>The Upper Room , 1984. Lithograph, </li></ul><ul><li>4' x 2' 11&quot; </li></ul>
    12. 12. African-American Women Artists <ul><li>&quot;Despite over three hundred years of racial, sexual, and economic oppression, black women continue to demonstrate that their creative talents will not be suppressed...and they, like the exhibition itself, are creative acts of resistance and empowerment.&quot; </li></ul>Bearing Witness: Contemporary Works by African American Women Artists , Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 1999
    13. 13. Marie Johnson-Calloway (b. 1920) <ul><li>Hope Street: Church Mothers , 1984. </li></ul><ul><li>Mixed media, 4' x 7' 6&quot; x 5 Source: Artsednet </li></ul>
    14. 14. <ul><li>Jean Lacy, Noah (Bert Williams/Bill &quot;Bojangles&quot; Robinson) , 1986, animated music box. Source: Bearing Witness </li></ul><ul><li>. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Betye Saar (b. 1926) <ul><li>Nine Mojo Secrets, 1971 </li></ul><ul><li>Visit Betye Saar’s homepage </li></ul>
    16. 16. Betye Saar <ul><li>Liberation of Aunt Jemima&quot; 1972 </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Charnelle Holloway, Fertility Belt for the Career Woman , I995, Repoussé akua ba doll, sterling silver, bronze, mixed media. Source: Bearing Witness </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>Varnette P. Honeywood, The Caregiver, 1995, acrylic on canvas, courtesy of the artist. Source: Bearing Witness </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Beverly Buchanan, Blue Lightning , 1995, oil pastel on paper, Source: Bearing Witness </li></ul>
    20. 20. <ul><li>Betye Saar, Watching , 1995, mixed media on metal, 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist. Source: Bearing Witness </li></ul>
    21. 21. <ul><li>Carolyn Mazloomi, The Ancestors Speak to Me. Contemporary Quilt with African textiles, 2002. Source: African American Quilts </li></ul>
    22. 22. Sources... <ul><li>Mark Harden, The Artchive </li></ul><ul><li>California Africa-American Art Museum </li></ul><ul><li>ArtsEdNet </li></ul><ul><li>Art Quarter, Joe’s Art Journal </li></ul><ul><li>The Beat Museum http://beatmuseum.org </li></ul><ul><li>CGFA and Ellenspace </li></ul><ul><li>California State University, Hayward </li></ul>
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