Pileated Woodpecker Totem  A collaborative work with Mother               Nature  Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Tur...
Project narrative•   The sculpture was started by carpenter ants,    and was completed by a pair of Pileated    Woodpecker...
The idea was to string the pieces back together with long,threaded rods, being careful not to disturb the carving doneby t...
Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
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Pileated woodpecker totem slides

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A Collaboration with Mother Nature. The tree was carved by pileated woodpeckers, cut down by the highway department and reconstructed by the artist.

Published in: Spiritual, Art & Photos
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Pileated woodpecker totem slides

  1. 1. Pileated Woodpecker Totem A collaborative work with Mother Nature Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  2. 2. Project narrative• The sculpture was started by carpenter ants, and was completed by a pair of Pileated Woodpeckers. Deconstruction was by the Town of New Baltimore (NY) Highway Department and reconstruction was carried out by the artists.• We had noticed a tree on our road a couple of years ago and were struck by the drama of its appearance… which just kept getting better and better! When we came home one day to find that the highway department had taken it down to prevent it from falling on the road, we knew we had to get to work. The road crew had cut it into stove-length pieces, so it was easy to move into the studio. There it was studied for some time and the beginnings of the concept evolved. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  3. 3. The idea was to string the pieces back together with long,threaded rods, being careful not to disturb the carving doneby the woodpeckers.Reconstruction began by building a “drilling sled” that wouldallow the accurate drilling of two long holes through eachpiece with a ship auger. Once the holes were drilled, thewood was treated with clear penetrating epoxy resin to“petrify” it. After the resin had cured, painting, masking andmore painting was done to highlight the areas carved by theants and birds.The re-assembly experimented with and without variousspacers, and culminated with the final approach whichincluded the welded steel spacers, base, buttresses andcrown, all designed to frame the work and to provide thestability that the internal connecting rods could not.The work was sited in a level area outside of the studio, andre-assembled piece by piece. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  4. 4. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  5. 5. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  6. 6. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  7. 7. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com
  8. 8. Pileated Woodpecker Totem © 2011 Bob Turan, Beaver Lane Studios, bobturan@rocketmail.com

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