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Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops … and Linux
 

Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops … and Linux

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In this talk, I'll focus on three areas of great opportunity as well as challenge for Linux: the accelerating market for cloud computing, Linux as a significant operating system for mainframes, and ...

In this talk, I'll focus on three areas of great opportunity as well as challenge for Linux: the accelerating market for cloud computing, Linux as a significant operating system for mainframes, and the hope for Linux on the desktop.

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    Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops … and Linux Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops … and Linux Presentation Transcript

    • Bob Sutor – VP, Open Source and Linux, IBM SWG LinuxCon – 21 September, 2009 Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops … and Linux © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Abstract  Linux is key to driving innovative new technology as well as business models.  It's shaking up the established view of which operating systems should be used for what workloads, while slipping quietly under some very cool new applications.  In this talk, I'll focus on three areas of great opportunity as well as challenge for Linux: the accelerating market for cloud computing, Linux as a significant operating system for mainframes, and the hope for Linux on the desktop. 2 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Agenda  The cloud from a user's perspective  Oh, yeah, my mainframe with Linux does that  Possible futures for the Linux desktop  Some 2008 predictions, one year later 3 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Who is the user for cloud computing?  Could be ... – A user of a virtualized desktop on a thin or fat client. – A non-technical end user who accesses services through a browser or via applications such as disk backup to remote storage. – A “cloud choreographer” who strings together cloud-based services to implement business processes. – A service provider who needs to handle peak load demands. – A developer who employs dynamic resource allocation in clouds to speed application or solution creation. – An IT system administrator who does not build clouds but deploys onto them, probably in addition to traditional managed systems. 4 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux What does a cloud computing user want?  Cloud-friendly applications  Resources: storage, processor, platform  APIs: the more standard the better  Interoperability among clouds (may learn of this need later)  Reduced capital expense  A good, workable pricing scheme  Quality of service, including – Availability – Reliability – Performance I don't think any one of these contradicts the use of Linux, and – Security they all potentially encourage it. – Privacy 5 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Case study: IBM internal cloud for developers Without With Cloud Cloud 100% New Development Liberated funding for new Strategic Software Costs development, Change transformation Capacity investment or direct saving Power Costs Current Case Study Results Deployment (1-time) IT Annual savings: $3.3M (84%) Spend Labor Costs (Operations and Software Costs $3.9M to $0.6M Maintenance) Power Costs Hardware, - 88.8% labor & power Labor Costs savings reduced Hardware Costs - 80.7% annual cost of (annualized) operation Hardware Costs by 83.8% - 88.7% Note: 3-Year Depreciation Period with 10% Discount Rate 6 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux What does a cloud computing provider need?  Maximum practical use of resources: processors, memory, storage  A good, workable pricing scheme  Virtualization, virtualization, virtualization  Acceptable licensing of operating systems being used  Highly reusable skills of system administrators  Minimal power used, heat generated, datacenter space needed I don't think any one of these contradicts the use of Linux, and they all potentially encourage it. 7 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux What special about Linux here?  Linux supports multiple hardware platforms – Implementation span from embedded devices to supercomputers – Speed of support for new platforms – Availability of skills, portability of applications – Scale-out through clustering as well as scale-up through SMP  Linux has an affinity with virtualization and is being used in clouds – Supported on all major hypervisors, from z/VM to VMware and Hyper-V – Ability to be paravirtualized with Xen – Inclusion of KVM as part of Linux  Linux is flexible – Modular and customizable, with flexible usage licensing  Linux is developed by an open community – Sharing skills and resources, leading to faster development 8 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Agenda  The cloud from a user's perspective  Oh, yeah, my mainframe with Linux does that  Possible futures for the Linux desktop  Some 2008 predictions, one year later 9 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Why people are using Linux on mainframes  Virtualization was introduced commercially on IBM mainframes in 1972.  Hypervisor is integrated with the hardware – Sharing of CPU, memory and I/O resources – Virtual network and virtual I/O  Reduced Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) – Environmental savings – single footprint vs. hundreds of servers – Consolidation savings – less storage, fewer servers, fewer software licenses, less server management/support  Mainframe capabilities complement and enhance those of Linux. 10 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Why people are using Linux on mainframes  Utilization often exceeds 90%  Manageability of centralized Linux systems  Typical deployment needs: – High performance transaction processing – I/O intensive workloads – Large database serving – High resiliency and security – Unpredictable and highly variable workload spikes – Low utilization infrastructure applications – Rapid provisioning and re-provisioning  Mainframe characteristics complement cloud user requirements 11 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux IBM's Project “Big Green” Double compute capacity with no increase in consumption or impact by 2010  IBM will consolidate and virtualize thousands of servers onto approximately 30 1997 Today IBM System z™ mainframes  Substantial savings expected in multiple CIOs 128 1 dimensions: energy, software and system Host data centers 155 7 support costs  The consolidated environment will use 80% Web hosting centers 80 5 less energy and 85% less floor space Network 31 1  This transformation is enabled by the Applications 15,000 4,700 System z sophisticated virtualization capability 12 September 17, 2009 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Agenda  The cloud from a user's perspective  Oh, yeah, my mainframe with Linux does that  Possible futures for the Linux desktop  Some 2008 predictions, one year later 13 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Possible futures for the Linux desktop  It goes away.  We stop using desktops, so who cares?  The Linux desktop becomes a tactic instead of a strategy.  One Linux desktop distribution ends up with 90% marketshare among those using Linux desktops.  One Linux desktop distribution ends up with 90% marketshare among all desktops.  We reach 33% / 33% / 33% parity with Microsoft® Windows® / Apple® Mac OS® / Linux, plus or minus. 14 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Possible futures for the Linux desktop  We stop pretending that it will be a drop-in replacement for the dominant desktop operating system, and make it something better.  The enterprise sweet spot for Linux desktops is virtualized Linux desktops.  We focus on usability, stability, security, reliability, performance, with some cool thrown in.  It's the browser, stupid. 15 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux An application running in a virtualized Linux desktop on a Linux rich client. 16 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Agenda  The cloud from a user's perspective  Oh, yeah, my mainframe with Linux does that  Possible futures for the Linux desktop  Some 2008 predictions, one year later 17 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux 2008 Prediction 1 “Green” will drive significant initiatives in open source Linux will help reduce energy consumption through server consolidation, virtualization, load balancing and more efficient resources management.  This is happening as major customers such as banks move to reduce their carbon footprints by consolidating onto mainframes, often getting features such as disaster recovery as a bonus.  Aside from tangential benefits of using Linux, I'm not seeing much yet in the way of open source being applied to green initiatives in a focused and specific way. 18 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux 2008 Prediction 2 Linux will not be replaced  I doubt anyone can seriously argue that any other open source operating system has made significant inroads on the growing installed base of Linux in the last year.  Linux will be introduced to thousands more users via implementations in mobile phones, though users may not know it.  Much of the hot technological action is happening on Linux, such as virtualization, and this will be essential for cloud computing.  Linux will increasingly find itself competing against proprietary virtualization technologies.  Linux Inside? 19 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux 2008 Prediction 3 Linux mindshare will be less x86 focused  In the cloud, users may not know there is Linux Inside, much less x86 Inside.  From a device perspective, users will think less of operating systems and chips, but more of user interfaces, media, connectivity, applications, app stores, and coolness.  Customers are more than capable of choosing the correct hardware platform to match their planned workloads.  The instability and uncertainty in the industry this year is causing customers to re-evaluate their software/hardware platforms and has been a great opportunity for Linux and competitive winbacks. 20 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux 2008 Prediction 7 Open standards will grab more attention  The Open Document Format (ODF) is being approved for use in more and more countries around the world.  Recent adoptees include Malaysia, Norway, Ecuador, Venezuela, Taiwan, Hungary, and Latvia.  The Open Cloud Manifesto has over 250 companies and groups supporting it.  The industry and users will benefit the most from an emerging technology when open standards are at the core, and there as early as possible. 21 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Finishing up ...  Linux is at the center of the computing we have today and that which we are building for tomorrow.  I believe the Linux community and leadership will rise to tackle Mainframes any challenges necessary to meet and exceed expectations. Desktops Cloud 22 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux For more information ...  IBM and Linux http://www.ibm.com/linux/  Linux on IBM System z http://www.ibm.com/systems/z/os/linux/  IBM Cloud Computing http://www.ibm.com/cloud/  Bob Sutor's blog http://www.sutor.com/blog  Open Cloud Manifesto http://www.opencloudmanifesto.org/ 23 © 2009 IBM Corporation
    • Bob Sutor: Regarding Clouds, Mainframes, and Desktops...and Linux Trademarks & Disclaimers The following are trademarks of the International Business Machines Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. For a complete list of IBM Trademarks, see www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml: IBM, the IBM logo, BladeCenter, Calibrated Vectored Cooling, ClusterProven, Cool Blue, POWER, PowerExecutive, Predictive Failure Analysis, ServerProven, Power Systems, System Storage, System x , System z, WebSphere, DB2 and Tivoli are trademarks of IBM Corporation in the United States and/or other countries. For a list of additional IBM trademarks, please see http://ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml. The following are trademarks or registered trademarks of other companies: Java and all Java based trademarks and logos are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc., in the United States and other countries or both Microsoft, Windows,Windows NT and the Windows logo are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Intel, Intel logo, Intel Inside, Intel Inside logo, Intel Centrino, Intel Centrino logo, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, and Pentium are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries in the United States and other countries. UNIX is a registered trademark of The Open Group in the United States and other countries or both. Linux is a trademark of Linus Torvalds in the United States, other countries, or both. Cell Broadband Engine is a trademark of Sony Computer Entertainment Inc. InfiniBand is a trademark of the InfiniBand Trade Association. Other company, product, or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. NOTES: Linux penguin image courtesy of Larry Ewing ( lewing@isc.tamu.edu) and The GIMP Any performance data contained in this document was determined in a controlled environment. Actual results may vary significantly and are dependent on many factors including system hardware configuration and software design and configuration. Some measurements quoted in this document may have been made on development-level systems. There is no guarantee these measurements will be the same on generally-available systems. Users of this document should verify the applicable data for their specific environment. IBM hardware products are manufactured from new parts, or new and serviceable used parts. Regardless, our warranty terms apply. The information contained in this presentation is provided for informational purposes only. Although efforts were made to verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this presentation, it is provided “as is”, without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plans and strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damages arising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this presentation or any other documentation. Nothing contained in this presentation is intended to, or shall have the effect of creating any warranty or representation from IBM (or its affiliates or its or their suppliers and/or licensors); or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the use of IBM software. All customer examples cited or described in this presentation are presented as illustrations of the manner in which some customers have used IBM products and the results they may have achieved. Actual environmental costs and performance characteristics will vary depending on individual customer configurations and conditions. This publication was produced in the United States. IBM may not offer the products, services or features discussed in this document in other countries, and the information may be subject to change without notice. Consult your local IBM business contact for information on the product or services available in your area. Information about non-IBM products is obtained from the manufacturers of those products or their published announcements. IBM has not tested those products and cannot confirm the performance, compatibility, or any other claims related to non-IBM products. Questions on the capabilities of non-IBM products should be addressed to the suppliers of those products. Prices are suggested US list prices and are subject to change without notice. Starting price may not include a hard drive, operating system or other features. Contact your IBM representative or Business Partner for the most current pricing in your geography. Any proposed use of claims in this presentation outside of the United States must be reviewed by local IBM country counsel prior to such use. Changes are periodically made to the information herein; these changes will be incorporated in new editions of the publication. IBM may make improvements and/or changes in the product(s) and/or the program(s) described in this publication at any time. © 2009 IBM Corporation