Photo-Real Architectural Renderings

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My name is Bobby Parker, and I'm a Professional Minnesota based architectural illustrator who specializes in photo-real architectural renderings.

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Photo-Real Architectural Renderings

  1. 1. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Photo-Real Architectural Renderings Bob Parker – Nor-Son, Inc.
  2. 2. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 No, Bob Parker!
  3. 3. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Nor-Son, Inc. • Nor-Son is a Integrated Construction Services Company • Homes, Hospitality, Healthcare, Commercial • Since 1978
  4. 4. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 My Work
  5. 5. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 My Work
  6. 6. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 My Work
  7. 7. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 My Work
  8. 8. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 • Technical Workflow • Learn How to See • Learn to be an Artist • Become a Photographer • Post Production • Tips and Resources
  9. 9. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Optimization: To optimize render speed, hide anything that is not visible in the camera view. • Exporting the camera view will mean only elements that are turned on in the model will be exported so you do not need to worry about hidden elements coming out in the export.
  10. 10. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Exporting to FBX: FBX is a format used by Autodesk for better interoperability between Revit and 3ds Max. • To export to FBX, make sure the camera or 3D view is active and go to Revit Icon > Export > FBX.
  11. 11. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Importing files into 3ds Max: • 3D MAX Icon > Import >Link FBX and click OK. • Preset: Autodesk Revit FBX - Change Combine by Revit materials • Just know, there are other export/import options.
  12. 12. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow
  13. 13. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Import • Link Revit
  14. 14. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Import Using Materials
  15. 15. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Pick Your Revit Camera
  16. 16. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Technical Workflow • Check to Keep Materials
  17. 17. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn How to See • Learning how to see like an artist is a crucial step to improving your architectural renderings. • So how can we learn to see? • It is a skill that can be taught, learned, and developed. • Our goal is to create renderings that are representational.
  18. 18. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn How to See • To improve this skill, we must practice observing objects as they are seen before they are processed by the brain. • Our minds are conditioned to “make sense” of the objects around us. • If you practice looking, and you’re clear on what you are looking for ,you will begin to see like an artist.
  19. 19. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn How to See • And seeing like an artist will lead to better architectural renderings
  20. 20. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • If an artist is successfully in welding all three of these components (subject, form, and content) in a work, they become inseparable, mutually interactive, and interrelated.
  21. 21. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  22. 22. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • The subject of visual art can be a person, an object, a theme, or an idea. • Subject matter: Images or topics which comprise the subject matter of a work of art include but are not limited to: • dreams, emotions, fantasies, figures (allegorical, mythological, nudes, single and group portraits), historical and/or political events, landscapes, religious events, still-life (flowers, interiors, tables of fruit).
  23. 23. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • As a component of art, the word form refers to the total overall arrangement or organization of an artwork • In a broader sense, form, in art, means the whole of a piece's visible elements and the way those elements are united. In this context, form allows us as viewers to mentally capture the work and understand it.
  24. 24. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • The emotional or intellectual message of art is its content • Content is idea-based and means: • What the artist meant to portray, • what the artist actually did portray and • how we react, as individuals, to both the intended and actual messages. • Additionally, content includes ways in which a work was influenced--by religion, or politics, or society in general, or even the artist's use of hallucinogenic substances--at the time it was created. All of these factors, together, make up the content side of art.
  25. 25. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • One way to add visual interest in your rendering is to compose the rendering such that the major elements lead the viewer through the rendering (fence or road).
  26. 26. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  27. 27. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  28. 28. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • Using contrast is another way to bring your viewer to your focal point. • Your eye is naturally drawn to the highest contrast point in your rendering.
  29. 29. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  30. 30. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  31. 31. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist • The rule of thirds is a "rule of thumb" or guideline which applies to the process of composing visual images. • The guideline proposes that an image should be divided into 9 parts by 2 equally-spaced horizontal and vertical • that important compositional elements should be placed along these lines or their intersections.
  32. 32. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Learn to be an Artist
  33. 33. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer • Photorealism is the genre of painting based on using cameras and photographs to gather visual information and then from this creating a painting that appears to be photographic. http://en.wikipedia.org
  34. 34. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer • Most modern day rendering engines use a physical camera.
  35. 35. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer • Aperture (f-number)
  36. 36. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer • Shutter Speed • Shutter is the effective length of time a camera's shutter is open
  37. 37. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer • Film speed (ISO): the measure of a photographic film's sensitivity to light • lower speed index requires more exposure to light to produce the same image density as a more sensitive film
  38. 38. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Become a Photographer
  39. 39. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production Post-production might well be the most underappreciated part of creating 3D visualizations. It gives you the power to easily make some changes; put in the sky you like, add some dirt, make the colors more vibrant and even correct some little mistakes in your 3D mesh.
  40. 40. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production • Film Grain: When using old cameras with film, there are pictures that often show grain in the darker areas of the image because the film won’t pick up the details in the darker part of the image. This effect can easily be achieved in our post- production package.
  41. 41. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production • Vignetting can have different causes in photography. The main cause is using a cheap lens / camera. Most of the time this effect is unwanted, but sometimes it can create an image that centers your eye, or guides it to a specific part of the image.
  42. 42. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production • Chromatic aberrations are caused by a lens that refracts the light spectrum in different ways on different places. Like with a prism, the light will disperse and fall on the sensor incorrectly. The effect will occur more on wide-angle lenses rather then tele-lenses. • It’s is a very subtle effect and will pretty much only show up in the corners and on the side of the images (unless your camera equipment is really bad).
  43. 43. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production • Color correction: This is where the fun begins. Color correction. The most common thing is to look at “lomography” photographs; they have huge amounts of saturation, produce those artifacts we want to see, and still manage to look stunning.
  44. 44. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production
  45. 45. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Post Production Make the effects subtle, but visible. Chromatic Aberration Noise Vignette
  46. 46. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • DSLR simulator • Virtual DSLR camera simulator will help teach you most of the ropes.
  47. 47. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Perspective – create visual impact by moving the camera left, right, above, and below – beneath the subject it often makes them/it appear more powerful to the viewer – above the subject it makes them/it appear more diminutive
  48. 48. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Use Shapes and Lines to Draw the Eye to a Specific Point • The viewer's eye doesn't magically end up looking at one of the intersections in the rule of thirds grid, it's just more natural. • When you're composing your rendering, consider the shapes and lines and where they draw your eye
  49. 49. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Frame Your Subject with Objects – If you have a boring subject, like an ordinary house, a blank background (like a clear sky) isn't going to be very compelling. Instead, try framing your subject with surrounding objects. – for example, using trees
  50. 50. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Place your main light source over your shoulder • Avoid placing your light source behind the camera • Placed directly in front of the object will seem to flatten the object by centering the highlight, restricting the shadow area, and limiting the range of value that defines the object.
  51. 51. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  52. 52. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • LightTrac is a must have tool for all outdoor Architectural Illustrators. Quickly determine at what time and location the light conditions are perfect to shoot your subjects outdoors.
  53. 53. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Blur your eyes, squint and try to see things out of focus; this will help you think of the objects in terms of spots, like a blurry photograph, instead of the objects themselves.
  54. 54. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources The composition should be simple, and it should be about one thing, or concept • When in doubt, keep it simple. Less is more. • Take time to plan out your composition. • interesting renderings have a harmonious balance of opposites, such as cool and warm, dark and light, thick and thin textures, detail and ambiguity, and hard and soft edges.
  55. 55. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Have a basic layout in mind, vertical or horizontal. • Have reference photos (BIG!) • Removing objects can be as helpful as adding new ones (What is it?) • Cast shadows are a wonderful way to explain form. A shadow gives solidity to the object casting the shadow, and the shape of the shadow can help explain other forms as well. • As you refine a composition, pay attention diagonal lines and angles created by objects; try to make diagonals more interesting through a slight adjustment. Also avoid creating tangents (places where objects abut or overlap one another) that are visually confusing. • Be open to removing something if it isn't working, even towards the end of the process. Fine tuning the negative spacing, as well as the way the various shapes overlap.
  56. 56. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • www.extremetextures.com • www.texturepilot.com • www.gobotree.com • www.texturer.com • www.texturemate.com • www.arroway-textures.com • www.marlinstudios.com • www.3dvalley.com/free-textures • www.cgtextures.com • www.textureportal.com • www.3dtexture.net • www.mayang.com/textures • www.turbosquid.com/textures
  57. 57. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  58. 58. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources psd-manager™ 3 is the most advanced PSD file exporter for 3ds Max and 3ds Max Design available on the market. Now you can readjust nearly everything in a rendering with Adobe® Photoshop® or any another application that supports PSD files. psd- manager is the tool to help you save time and money by integrating the tools you best know and like.
  59. 59. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  60. 60. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  61. 61. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  62. 62. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  63. 63. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  64. 64. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources
  65. 65. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Tips and Resources • Does this tricky “Gotcha” ruin the shading and colors in your rendering? This is an optical illusion that you face in your renderings everyday. In fact, both squares are the exact same color.
  66. 66. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 The Digital Grunt • Why is the color different here, than there? • Can you do this rendering free? It’ll be a good promotional piece for you. • Rendering’s easy, because the computer does all the work. • You create such great renderings–you must have a great computer. • Can’t you just Photoshop that? • Your renderings are awesome! What software do you use?
  67. 67. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 The Digital Grunt • Show us how you made it, so we can do it ourselves in-house, from now on. • Change this, and change that… “Why doesn’t my image look as good as your others?” • We do our own renderings, but thanks!
  68. 68. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 The Digital Grunt • By far, my favorite is, "I am going home for the day, here are my sketches; I have a client meeting tomorrow morning and I need a rendering."
  69. 69. © Nor-Son, Inc. 2013 Thank You! • Great renderings don’t just happen by accident. They take planning, patience, and a knowledge of all the tools at your disposal. If you have a question, or comment, please email me. You can Google: exterior renderings

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