Fire Risk Management on the Garrison<br />Our Approach to Managing Fire Risk That “Falls Outside” Our Scope of Services <b...
Robert P. Avsec<br />Career Summary<br />Battalion Chief (Ret.), Chesterfield (VA) Fire & EMS Department<br />Battalion Co...
Terminal Performance Objective<br />Given the need to ensure that Common Levels of Support (CLS) can be delivered with ass...
Enabling Objectives<br /><ul><li>Explain the Standard Time Temperature Curve and its impact on CLS 68 B – Provide Emergenc...
Describe how to use the 5-Step Process in the Army’s Composite Risk Management Program to address fire risk
List the IMES-F required actions to manage those risks that fall outside the parameters of CLS 68 for structural fire resp...
Governance<br />Risk<br />Governance<br />Risk<br />Legal Risks<br />Legal Risks<br />Reputational<br />Risk<br />Reputati...
The Way There<br /><ul><li>Understand the Scope of Services
Assess to determine where you can deliver on those services in your response zone(s)
Be Real—accept where you CAN’T deliver with the resources you have on hand
Develop a plan for those situations where you can’t meet the mission
Communicate the Plan</li></li></ul><li>Scope<br />of Services Defined<br />
Time Temperature Curve<br />Regardless of what standard of measurement you use, the principle is the same<br />Time equals...
Principles of Risk Management<br />Risk<br />Frequency<br />
Who’s at Risk?<br />We’ve Addressed the Risk to the “Blue Boxes” by Developing Our Scope of Services<br />Addressed throug...
The 10%: What We Need to Plan For<br />Any situation that exceeds our resources and their capabilities<br />The 90% : What...
Vehicle Fires
MVC with injuries/need for extrication
HazMat
Confined Space Rescue
WUI Fires</li></ul>Risk<br />Frequency<br />Source: Graham, Gordon.  Why things go right, why things go wrong<br />
Discretionary Time (DT)<br />Proactive<br />Non- Discretionary Time (NDT)<br />Reactive<br />Source: Graham, Gordon.  Why ...
Composite Risk Management<br />
Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br />Conduct combat patrol of SE sector of city <br />Provide fire protection for ...
Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Armed insurgents
IEDs
Snipers
Civilians loyal to insurgents
Located beyond acceptable ART from current stations
Light-weight wood construction
3 stories on Side “A”; some buildings 4+ stories on Side “C”
Available water supply </li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Hot, dry
Urban environment
Development is in Wild land Urban Interface (WUI)
Single, two-lane road is only access</li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>FES Staffing
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F&amp;Es Risk Assessment On Garrison 082409

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Presentation delivered to Fire Chiefs on Army and Defense Logistics Agency installations at DoD Fire &amp; ES Conference, Dallas, TX, 26 Aug 2009

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  • #1 – Robert Avsec is retired battalion chief who served the citizens of Chesterfield County, Virginia for twenty-five years with the men and women of the Chesterfield Fire & EMS Department. During his “1st Career”, he served a combined nine-and-a-half years assigned to staff officer manager positions—a unique experience that he says helped make him a much more rounded chief office. Those staff assignments included: Battalion Commander, Emergency Operations Division; Manager, Emergency Communications Center; Director of Training and Safety Division; and Director, EMS Division.He’s also been an instructor for training programs—at the local, state, and federal level--targeting student populations ranging from entry-level providers through chief officers. He’s been on the instructor staffs of both the Virginia Department of Fire Programs and the National Fire Academy, Emmitsburg, MD. #2-He embarked on a 2nd career working with a small, private sector ambulance service in southern Ohio helping a young company—in business less than 5 years—with strategic planning and organizational development.  Robert has also worked as an Instructor and Course Developer with the GA Fire Academy on the campus of the Georgia Public Safety Training Center in Forsyth, GA. His primary roles were teaching management level courses and developing a curriculum to meet NFPA Standard 1021 for Chief Officer III in GA. Currently, we’re delighted to have him assigned as a Senior Analyst from CALIBRE Systems working at HQDA IMCOM in IMES-F. Please join me in giving Robert a warm Army welcome!
  • F&amp;Es Risk Assessment On Garrison 082409

    1. 1. Fire Risk Management on the Garrison<br />Our Approach to Managing Fire Risk That “Falls Outside” Our Scope of Services <br />
    2. 2. Robert P. Avsec<br />Career Summary<br />Battalion Chief (Ret.), Chesterfield (VA) Fire & EMS Department<br />Battalion Commander, Emergency Operations Division<br />Manager, Emergency Communications Center<br />Director, Training & Safety Division<br />Director, EMS Division<br />Planning & Operational Consultant, Patriot EMS, Ironton, OH<br />Instructor & Course Developer, GA Fire Academy, Forsyth, GA<br />Senior Fire & EMS Analyst, CALIBRE Systems, Alexandria, VA<br />
    3. 3. Terminal Performance Objective<br />Given the need to ensure that Common Levels of Support (CLS) can be delivered with assigned resources, the Fire Chief will develop a Fire Risk Management Plan for their garrison that addresses those hazards where CLS measures cannot be accomplished, in compliance with the requirements of DoDI 6055.06, DES CLS 68, and the Army’s Composite Risk Management Program.<br />
    4. 4. Enabling Objectives<br /><ul><li>Explain the Standard Time Temperature Curve and its impact on CLS 68 B – Provide Emergency Response Services for Structural Fires
    5. 5. Describe how to use the 5-Step Process in the Army’s Composite Risk Management Program to address fire risk
    6. 6. List the IMES-F required actions to manage those risks that fall outside the parameters of CLS 68 for structural fire response</li></li></ul><li>We Work Better When We Work Together<br />Your communication of consistent, accurate, and timely information is critical to our mutual success<br />
    7. 7. Governance<br />Risk<br />Governance<br />Risk<br />Legal Risks<br />Legal Risks<br />Reputational<br />Risk<br />Reputational<br />Risk<br />Organizational Risk<br />Management (ORM)<br />Financial<br />Risk<br />Operational<br />Risk<br />Operational<br />Risk<br />Compliance<br />Risk<br />Compliance<br />Risk<br />
    8. 8. The Way There<br /><ul><li>Understand the Scope of Services
    9. 9. Assess to determine where you can deliver on those services in your response zone(s)
    10. 10. Be Real—accept where you CAN’T deliver with the resources you have on hand
    11. 11. Develop a plan for those situations where you can’t meet the mission
    12. 12. Communicate the Plan</li></li></ul><li>Scope<br />of Services Defined<br />
    13. 13. Time Temperature Curve<br />Regardless of what standard of measurement you use, the principle is the same<br />Time equals loss<br />
    14. 14. Principles of Risk Management<br />Risk<br />Frequency<br />
    15. 15. Who’s at Risk?<br />We’ve Addressed the Risk to the “Blue Boxes” by Developing Our Scope of Services<br />Addressed through Job Hazard Analysis (JHA)<br />
    16. 16. The 10%: What We Need to Plan For<br />Any situation that exceeds our resources and their capabilities<br />The 90% : What We Should Be Able to Do Within Our Scope of Services<br /><ul><li>Structure Fires in SFD & MFD
    17. 17. Vehicle Fires
    18. 18. MVC with injuries/need for extrication
    19. 19. HazMat
    20. 20. Confined Space Rescue
    21. 21. WUI Fires</li></ul>Risk<br />Frequency<br />Source: Graham, Gordon. Why things go right, why things go wrong<br />
    22. 22. Discretionary Time (DT)<br />Proactive<br />Non- Discretionary Time (NDT)<br />Reactive<br />Source: Graham, Gordon. Why things go right, why things go wrong<br />
    23. 23.
    24. 24.
    25. 25. Composite Risk Management<br />
    26. 26. Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br />Conduct combat patrol of SE sector of city <br />Provide fire protection for new privatized housing site on base<br />
    27. 27. Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Armed insurgents
    28. 28. IEDs
    29. 29. Snipers
    30. 30. Civilians loyal to insurgents
    31. 31. Located beyond acceptable ART from current stations
    32. 32. Light-weight wood construction
    33. 33. 3 stories on Side “A”; some buildings 4+ stories on Side “C”
    34. 34. Available water supply </li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Hot, dry
    35. 35. Urban environment
    36. 36. Development is in Wild land Urban Interface (WUI)
    37. 37. Single, two-lane road is only access</li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>FES Staffing
    38. 38. Soldiers
    39. 39. Family Members
    40. 40. Smoke detectors
    41. 41. Alarm systems
    42. 42. Apparatus
    43. 43. Station locations
    44. 44. Physical condition
    45. 45. Training
    46. 46. Equipment
    47. 47. Troops available</li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Movement time
    48. 48. Enemy timeline
    49. 49. How much time to prepare?
    50. 50. Priority of work
    51. 51. Discretionary Time (DT)
    52. 52. Non-Discretionary Time (NDT)
    53. 53. How much time to prepare?
    54. 54. Priority of work</li></li></ul><li>Hazard Identification (METT-TC Process)<br /><ul><li>Building Code
    55. 55. Fire Prevention Code
    56. 56. NFPA Standards
    57. 57. DoDI 6055.06
    58. 58. AR 420-1
    59. 59. Service 68 CLS
    60. 60. Refugees
    61. 61. ROE (Rules of Engagement)
    62. 62. ROI (Rules of Interaction)
    63. 63. Gov’t agencies</li></li></ul><li>When wecannot deliver our services according to our Scope of Service<br />
    64. 64.
    65. 65. Developing controls at 0200 hrs with the building on fire and babies hanging from the balconies is a %&$#@!<br />Make good use of your Discretionary Time<br />
    66. 66. “The serious losses in life and property resulting annually from fires cause me deep concern.  I am sure that such unnecessary waste can be reduced.  The substantial progress made in the science of fire prevention and fire protection in this country during the past forty years convinces me that the means are available for limiting this unnecessary destruction.”<br />-----Harry S Truman<br />May 13, 1948<br />
    67. 67. Fire Reduction Controls<br />Education<br />Engineering<br />Enforcement<br />II – 1976<br />III – 1986<br />IV – 1996<br />V - 2003<br />February 1966<br />
    68. 68. Engineering<br />Require residential sprinklers in all newly constructed one and two family homes. Period.<br />Change building codes so that all building materials must pass fire resistance performance standards, not just “gravity-defiance” standards.<br />Change building codes in Wild land Urban Interface areas to prohibit the use of combustible building materials. Mandate the use of block, concrete, stucco, and other non-combustible materials. Period.<br />Mandate Fire-safe cigarettes nation-wide.<br />Source: Avsec, R.P., 21st Century Manifesto, Fire Chief Magazine, Mutual Aid blog, http://blog.firechief.com/mutual_aid/?author=6<br />
    69. 69. Education<br />Require that all residential property in a locality—rental and occupant-owned—has a copy of the locality’s fire prevention code “do’s and don’ts”, written in “plain English” and other applicable languages for the community.<br />Require fire departments and school systems to jointly deliver a standard fire prevention curriculum in elementary, middle, and high schools every two years.<br />Require completion of fire prevention course of study as prerequisite for obtaining a residential lease or buying a home.<br />Require insurance companies to inspect rental and occupant-owned residential properties before insuring the property. Require policy holders to submit an affidavit to their insurance company stating that they comply with the fire prevention provisions of their policy and their locality every year as a condition to renew their coverage. <br />Source: Avsec, R.P., 21st Century Manifesto, Fire Chief Magazine, Mutual Aid blog, http://blog.firechief.com/mutual_aid/?author=6<br />
    70. 70. Enforcement<br />Investigate all fires and issue a court summons to the building occupant if a fire is determined to have been caused by their negligence. (Just like a traffic accident: if you’re at fault, you pay the price.)<br />Bill the occupant for the cost of fire suppression services when a fire is determined to have been the result of occupant negligence. <br />Fine builders and contractors when a fire investigation reveals that improper building materials or building practices (a) started the fire or (b) contributed to the spread of the fire.<br />Fine rental property owners who do not maintain their rental properties and whose properties are not in compliance with the locality’s fire prevention code.<br />Incorporate a locality’s level of fire protection and history of fire loss into the financial processes that financial institutions use to determine a locality’s bond rating.<br />Source: Avsec, R.P., 21st Century Manifesto, Fire Chief Magazine, Mutual Aid blog, http://blog.firechief.com/mutual_aid/?author=6<br />
    71. 71. Remember—We’re addressing the 10% or so that our Scope of Services do not address<br />
    72. 72.
    73. 73.
    74. 74.
    75. 75.
    76. 76. When We Can’t Meet Our Scope of Service—Implement Controls<br />
    77. 77. Enabling Objectives<br /><ul><li>Explain the Standard Time Temperature Curve and its impact on CLS 68 B – Provide Emergency Response Services for Structural Fires
    78. 78. Describe how to use the 5-Step Process in the Army’s Composite Risk Management Program to address fire risk
    79. 79. List the actions required by IMES-F to manage those risks that fall outside the parameters of CLS 68 for structural fire response</li></li></ul><li>Questions?<br />U.S. Army, Custer Barracks, Battle Creek, Michigan, 18 Sept 1918<br />Source: Port Huron Museum, http://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~miporthu/Boldt/BoldtCollection.htm<br />

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