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Elements of fiction
 

Elements of fiction

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    Elements of fiction Elements of fiction Presentation Transcript

    • Elements of Fiction Literary Terms
    • Fiction
      • Writing about imaginary people, places, or events in the form of novels or short stories.
    • Plot: The sequence of events in a story.
      • All stories have five parts that make it complete
      • Exposition
      • Rising Action
      • Climax
      • Falling Action
      • Resolution
    • Exposition: The beginning of the story; sets the scene for the conflict.
      • Setting: The time and place in which the events of the story occur. The setting is very important to the story! Without an interesting setting the story may not be successful
      • Characters: People, animals, or imaginary
      • creatures that take part in the action of the story.
    • There are two main types of characters in a story.
      • Protagonist: The main character. This would be the “Good Guy” in the story.
      • Antagonist: The character that work against the protagonist. Also known as the “Bad Guy.”
    • The Antagonist and Protagonist can be either :
      • Static Character: The character’s personality, opinions, and/or actions stay the same throughout the entire story.
      • Dynamic Character: The character’s personality, opinions, and/or actions change because of what happens in the story.
    • Rising Action:
      • The rising action is the longest part of a story.
      • In the rising action, one or more of the story’s
      • characters work to resolve the conflict of the
      • story.
      • The characters work through a series of events
      • that makes it hard for the characters to get what
      • they want.
    • Conflict: A problem or struggle between two or more opposing forces.
      • Internal Conflict : a character struggles with his/her own personal issues.
      • Character vs. Self
      • External Conflict: a character struggles against an outside force such as another character, a force of nature, or an aspect of society.
      • Character vs. Other
    • Climax:
      • The highest point of interest or turning
      • point in a story. It is the point at which
      • one or more of the conflicts is resolved.
    • Falling Action:
      • Shows what happens to the character after
      • The conflict is resolved.
    • Resolution:
      • Gives the final outcome of the story. Can
      • also reveal the Theme of the story.
      • Theme: The main message that the reader can take from the story.
    • Types of Plot
      • Boy meets girl
      • Man vs. Man
      • Man vs. Self
      • Man vs. Nature
      • Man vs. Civilization
    • Point of View:
      • The vantage point from which a story is told.
      • It reveals who tells the story and what that narrator can “see” or how the narrator or the characters “see” the story.
    • First-person point of view
      • When the narrator is one of the characters and calls himself or herself “I.”
      • This point of view often helps readers identify with the narrator.
    • Second-person point of view
      • When the story is written as if the reader is one of the characters and is the “you” referred to in the story.
    • Third-person point of view
      • When the narrator is a storyteller who isn’t part of the story.
      • A limited third-person narrator reveals the thoughts and feelings of only one character. It’s as if the storyteller is perched on one character’s shoulders and can see inside the character’s head.
      • An omniscient (all knowing) third person narrator reveals the thoughts and feelings of several characters. It’s as if the story teller can fly around, seeing what goes on everywhere, and looking into several characters’ minds.