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Social media & learning: everyone is a teacher - everyone is a student
 

Social media & learning: everyone is a teacher - everyone is a student

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My slides for the 10 years Instruxion.com event, focussing on the possible role of technology in learning environments (from class rooms and meetings rooms as Walden Zones to using tools like ...

My slides for the 10 years Instruxion.com event, focussing on the possible role of technology in learning environments (from class rooms and meetings rooms as Walden Zones to using tools like Feedburner, Social Media Classroom, Google Shared Items, Oamos, Storify, Edublogs, Hootcourse, and KeynoteTweet to enhance audience participation and dialogue.

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    Social media & learning: everyone is a teacher - everyone is a student Social media & learning: everyone is a teacher - everyone is a student Presentation Transcript

    • Social media & learning:everyone is a teacher - everyone is a student Clo Willaerts (@bnox) 7 June 2011, Laken
    • Walden zone vs public screens http://www.demorgen.be/dm/nl/2461/De-Gedachte/article/detail/1266502/2011/05/19/Hoe-we-onze-internetjeugd-opnieuw-bij-de-les-krijgen.dhtml
    • Walden zone
    • Private screens
    • Who dares to teach must never cease to learn. ~John Cotton Dana
    • Twitter Adoption Matrix Based on work by Rick Reo as revised by Mark Sample in August 2009
    • Monologic vs Dialogic
    • Passive vs Active Creators Conversationalists Critics Collectors Joiners Spectators Inactives
    • A1D1 Institutional communicationUses: community outreach, alerts, announcements
    • A2D1 Instructor CommunicationUses: announcements, syllabus changes, reminders
    • A3D1 Pedagogical CommunicationUses: sharing timely links and resources
    • A1D2 Tracking ActivitiesUses: find and follow instructor, experts in the field, or key topicsBenefits: exposure to the larger cultural conversation about the class material http://www.oamos.com/search/?lan=en&que=%27Andy+Warhol%27
    • A2D2 Lightly Structured ActivitiesUses: solicit course feedback, offer ambient office hours, poll class, language or writing practiceBenefits: flexibility, availability, scalability
    • A3D2 Metacognitive/Reflective ActivitiesUses: students report on self learning, articulate their difficulties, recap the most valuable lesson of the dayBenefits: fosters critical thinking
    • A1D3 In-class Back ChannelUses: ad hoc class discussions, real-time commenting, recording divergent viewpointsBenefits: engages less vocal students, archives otherwise ephemeral comments
    • A2D3 Outside of Class DiscussionsUses: extend class discussions, exchange comments about readings or questions about assignmentsBenefits: community building, continuity between class sessions
    • A3D3 In-class Directed DiscussionUses: Open or guided questions with student responses collected for later analysisBenefits: engages all students in discussions in large lecture classes http://thenextweb.com/lifehacks/2011/04/22/how-to-auto-tweet-during-your-keynote/
    • Conclusion?
    • Questions?Clo.willaerts@sanomamedia.be Social media for business?Http://www.conversity.be/blog