I develop as_my_network_develops_nov_6_2010

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  • Previously copyright was binary: Either all rights retained or public domain
    Click
    However, the affordances of technology is changing our understanding and need for Copyright
    Now alternative licensing options such as Creative Commons provide a range of options allowing us to reserve some of our rights.
    In terms of openness – CC gives us a space to operate between all rights reserved and the public domain.
    Naturally, when you apply a restrictive clause your work becomes difficult for others to use or build on.
    Recall that by default, you retain full copyright on any of your works. Even when sharing with colleagues in digital form an understanding of copyright is quite unclear. So if someone happens upon your work in their daily web searches they will not know exactly how they can use it.
  • And finally it was adapted locally at the University of Cape Town for the South African context.
    What this diagram represents is the idea of an open scholar.
    The term ‘open scholar’ has started being used to indicate a new type of academic for whom ‘openness’ is the default approach. This academic is largely online, probably keeps a blog, makes all their presentations available via something like slideshare, engages with new resources such as YouTube, shares bookmarks in delicious, belongs to social networks such as ning or twitter and publishes some of their content in open access journals.
    There are powerful sentiments coming out lately in terms of education reform - The more powerful technology becomes and the more abundant information becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are
    The open scholar shares their teaching and learning material and knowledge of quality content and uses ideas from other OER’s around the world. Rather than spending a great deal of time designing their teaching materials (or tools) they can focus on pedagogy, context, and teaching.
    The key to all this is easy sharing and networking facilitated by open licensing and new technologies. The academic can increase their reach and visibility in the process.
  • And finally it was adapted locally at the University of Cape Town for the South African context.
    What this diagram represents is the idea of an open scholar.
    The term ‘open scholar’ has started being used to indicate a new type of academic for whom ‘openness’ is the default approach. This academic is largely online, probably keeps a blog, makes all their presentations available via something like slideshare, engages with new resources such as YouTube, shares bookmarks in delicious, belongs to social networks such as ning or twitter and publishes some of their content in open access journals.
    There are powerful sentiments coming out lately in terms of education reform - The more powerful technology becomes and the more abundant information becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are
    The open scholar shares their teaching and learning material and knowledge of quality content and uses ideas from other OER’s around the world. Rather than spending a great deal of time designing their teaching materials (or tools) they can focus on pedagogy, context, and teaching.
    The key to all this is easy sharing and networking facilitated by open licensing and new technologies. The academic can increase their reach and visibility in the process.
  • And finally it was adapted locally at the University of Cape Town for the South African context.
    What this diagram represents is the idea of an open scholar.
    The term ‘open scholar’ has started being used to indicate a new type of academic for whom ‘openness’ is the default approach. This academic is largely online, probably keeps a blog, makes all their presentations available via something like slideshare, engages with new resources such as YouTube, shares bookmarks in delicious, belongs to social networks such as ning or twitter and publishes some of their content in open access journals.
    There are powerful sentiments coming out lately in terms of education reform - The more powerful technology becomes and the more abundant information becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are
    The open scholar shares their teaching and learning material and knowledge of quality content and uses ideas from other OER’s around the world. Rather than spending a great deal of time designing their teaching materials (or tools) they can focus on pedagogy, context, and teaching.
    The key to all this is easy sharing and networking facilitated by open licensing and new technologies. The academic can increase their reach and visibility in the process.
  • And finally it was adapted locally at the University of Cape Town for the South African context.
    What this diagram represents is the idea of an open scholar.
    The term ‘open scholar’ has started being used to indicate a new type of academic for whom ‘openness’ is the default approach. This academic is largely online, probably keeps a blog, makes all their presentations available via something like slideshare, engages with new resources such as YouTube, shares bookmarks in delicious, belongs to social networks such as ning or twitter and publishes some of their content in open access journals.
    There are powerful sentiments coming out lately in terms of education reform - The more powerful technology becomes and the more abundant information becomes, the more indispensable good teachers are
    The open scholar shares their teaching and learning material and knowledge of quality content and uses ideas from other OER’s around the world. Rather than spending a great deal of time designing their teaching materials (or tools) they can focus on pedagogy, context, and teaching.
    The key to all this is easy sharing and networking facilitated by open licensing and new technologies. The academic can increase their reach and visibility in the process.
  • Previously copyright was binary: Either all rights retained or public domain
    Click
    However, the affordances of technology is changing our understanding and need for Copyright
    Now alternative licensing options such as Creative Commons provide a range of options allowing us to reserve some of our rights.
    In terms of openness – CC gives us a space to operate between all rights reserved and the public domain.
    Naturally, when you apply a restrictive clause your work becomes difficult for others to use or build on.
    Recall that by default, you retain full copyright on any of your works. Even when sharing with colleagues in digital form an understanding of copyright is quite unclear. So if someone happens upon your work in their daily web searches they will not know exactly how they can use it.
  • Previously copyright was binary: Either all rights retained or public domain
    Click
    However, the affordances of technology is changing our understanding and need for Copyright
    Now alternative licensing options such as Creative Commons provide a range of options allowing us to reserve some of our rights.
    In terms of openness – CC gives us a space to operate between all rights reserved and the public domain.
    Naturally, when you apply a restrictive clause your work becomes difficult for others to use or build on.
    Recall that by default, you retain full copyright on any of your works. Even when sharing with colleagues in digital form an understanding of copyright is quite unclear. So if someone happens upon your work in their daily web searches they will not know exactly how they can use it.
  • Previously copyright was binary: Either all rights retained or public domain
    Click
    However, the affordances of technology is changing our understanding and need for Copyright
    Now alternative licensing options such as Creative Commons provide a range of options allowing us to reserve some of our rights.
    In terms of openness – CC gives us a space to operate between all rights reserved and the public domain.
    Naturally, when you apply a restrictive clause your work becomes difficult for others to use or build on.
    Recall that by default, you retain full copyright on any of your works. Even when sharing with colleagues in digital form an understanding of copyright is quite unclear. So if someone happens upon your work in their daily web searches they will not know exactly how they can use it.
  • Previously copyright was binary: Either all rights retained or public domain
    Click
    However, the affordances of technology is changing our understanding and need for Copyright
    Now alternative licensing options such as Creative Commons provide a range of options allowing us to reserve some of our rights.
    In terms of openness – CC gives us a space to operate between all rights reserved and the public domain.
    Naturally, when you apply a restrictive clause your work becomes difficult for others to use or build on.
    Recall that by default, you retain full copyright on any of your works. Even when sharing with colleagues in digital form an understanding of copyright is quite unclear. So if someone happens upon your work in their daily web searches they will not know exactly how they can use it.
  • I develop as_my_network_develops_nov_6_2010

    1. 1. I Develop as my Network Develops 37th International MEXTESOL Convention & 10th Central American and Caribbean Basin Convention Cancún, Mexico November 6, 2010 Benjamin Stewart Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes, Mexico
    2. 2. Research questions  How does an EFL educator's own perception of English language proficiency, pedagogical skill set/orientation, and knowledge of applied linguistics impact one's contribution to a personal learning network (PLN)?  How does pursuing a PLN influence change in an EFL educator's teaching practice? Teaching begins with learning. Diane Larsen/Freeman (Nov. 6, 2010)
    3. 3. Six degrees of Kevin Bacon What is a network? Gary Busey Danny Glover Kevin Kline Kevin Dunn Kevin Bacon
    4. 4. How do we learn through a network? Essential question
    5. 5. Groups versus Networks http://www.flickr.com/photos/stephen_downes/252157734/sizes/l/in/photostream/ Unity Coordination Closed Distributive Diversity Autonomy Openness Connective
    6. 6. Networks, CoP, and SCT A network is not integrated, it is made of “small pieces” and is “loosely joined”. Downes, 2008 http://www.slideshare.net/Downes/connectivism-a-theory-of-personal-learning Communities of practice Sociocultural theory Put another way, nodes are “softly assembled”. Diane Larsen/Freeman
    7. 7. When building a professional development network, what comes first? Essential question
    8. 8. Learning to share To receive everything, one must open one's hands and give -Taisen Deshimaru
    9. 9. We share, we learn. Emergent (learning to play the guitar) Constructed (learning to make a guitar) http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/aa/HSBC_Building.JPG http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d8/Sommerblumen01.JPG
    10. 10. What is a personal learning network? Essential Question
    11. 11. The Typical Teacher Alec Couros (http://twitter.com/courosa/) of Open Thinking blog created this graphic (http://educationaltechnology.ca/couros/)
    12. 12. Professional “Learning” Community Alec Couros (http://twitter.com/courosa/) of Open Thinking blog created this graphic (http://educationaltechnology.ca/couros/)
    13. 13. • The Networked Teacher (Leader) Alec Couros (http://twitter.com/courosa/) of Open Thinking blog created this graphic (http://educationaltechnology.ca/couros/)
    14. 14. • Learning Network Community Alec Couros (http://twitter.com/courosa/) of Open Thinking blog created this graphic (http://educationaltechnology.ca/couros/) http://educationinnovation.typepad.com/.a/6a00d83533a43669e201156fdea24e970c-pi ...considers the attributes of the nodes and the type of interactions that link the nodes
    15. 15. How can you contribute to a personal learning network? Essential Question
    16. 16. Web 2.0
    17. 17. Participatory tools give learners power and control. Making a Contribution, Wiki Style! (Bonk, 2009, p. 235)
    18. 18. PFLE: http://wikieducator.org/PFLE Publishing an Open Educational Resource (OER)
    19. 19. The emergence of alternative licenses • Copyright © • Public domain
    20. 20. This work is licensed under the Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Reuse Revise Remix Redistribute
    21. 21. Final essential question http://www.ubuntu.com/ http://www.openoffice.org/ http://www.google.com/chrome What I used to prepare for this presentation. Where will open, transparent learning that results from an ongoing pursuit of a personal learning network take you?
    22. 22. Final essential question
    23. 23. References & Attribution Bonk, C. (2009). The world is open. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. Patricia Schlicht, Wikieducator http://www.wikieducator.org/User:Pschlicht patricia@oerfoundation.org Michael Paskevicius, Michelle Willmers & Cheryl Hodgkinson-Williams Teaching with Technology Mini Conference 18 November 2009 University of Cape Town
    24. 24. Thank you for your attention! Benjamin Stewart Universidad Autónoma de Aguascalientes blstewart@correo.uaa.mx Wikieducator http://www.wikieducator.org/User:Bnleez Collaborative Understandings Blog: http://bnleez.wordpress.com/ * Wikieducator: http://wikieducator.org/Main_Page * Foreign Language Program: http://wikieducator.org/PFLE * Connective English language learning (CELL): http://wikieducator.org/User:Bnleez/cell * Distance English Language Learning (DELL): * http://wikieducator.org/Distancelanguagelearning

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