Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies

200
-1

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
200
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies

  1. 1. Instructional Strategies: Games!!<br />Brittany Barrett<br />SLIS 5720.001<br />February 11, 2011<br />
  2. 2. What is Gaming in the Classroom?<br />According to Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2008), “Gaming provides a competitive environment in which learners follow prescribed rules as they strive to attain a challenging educational goal,” (p. 30).<br />
  3. 3. A Few Aspects of Gaming<br />Highly motivating<br />1 player or multiplayer learning environment<br />Younger or older learners<br />Uses problem-solving skills, solution finding, and demonstrates mastery<br />
  4. 4. Advantages vs. Limitations<br />Advantages:<br />Limitations:<br />Engaging: Student are quickly engaged<br />Match to outcomes: Simplification allows matched learning outcomes<br />Variety of settings: individual to group<br />Gain attention: to learn a specific topic<br />Competition concerns: do not want competition to override learning<br />Levels of difficulty: depends on students’ abilities<br />Expense: some games can be expensive<br />Misdirection of intention: Interest in winning may overtake interest in learning<br />
  5. 5. Bring it to the Classroom<br />Puzzles/Brain teasers:<br />Crossword: learning spelling or specific topics<br />Sudoku: learning math<br />Mahjong: recollection skills<br />Business Games<br />Mythical business company for older students<br />Practice buying/selling at a grocery store for younger students<br />Jeopardy: learning specific topics<br />
  6. 6. The Final Outcome<br />Students are surrounded by games outside of the classroom, so it would only make sense to bring games into the classroom.<br />Students want to achieve success and so they want to repeatedly play a game, develop an understanding, and ultimately succeed.<br />
  7. 7. Gaming Resources<br />Teachers have many resources available to them for gaming:<br />PC games such as “Brain Games”<br />Board games<br />Freeonlinegames.com<br />Their own mind; ie. Make up your own game<br />
  8. 8. References<br />Smaldino, S. E., Lowther, D. L., & Russell, J. D. (2008). Instructional technology and media for learning (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.<br />

×