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Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies
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Barrett slis 5720 instructional strategies

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  • 1. Instructional Strategies: Games!!<br />Brittany Barrett<br />SLIS 5720.001<br />February 11, 2011<br />
  • 2. What is Gaming in the Classroom?<br />According to Smaldino, Lowther, and Russell (2008), “Gaming provides a competitive environment in which learners follow prescribed rules as they strive to attain a challenging educational goal,” (p. 30).<br />
  • 3. A Few Aspects of Gaming<br />Highly motivating<br />1 player or multiplayer learning environment<br />Younger or older learners<br />Uses problem-solving skills, solution finding, and demonstrates mastery<br />
  • 4. Advantages vs. Limitations<br />Advantages:<br />Limitations:<br />Engaging: Student are quickly engaged<br />Match to outcomes: Simplification allows matched learning outcomes<br />Variety of settings: individual to group<br />Gain attention: to learn a specific topic<br />Competition concerns: do not want competition to override learning<br />Levels of difficulty: depends on students’ abilities<br />Expense: some games can be expensive<br />Misdirection of intention: Interest in winning may overtake interest in learning<br />
  • 5. Bring it to the Classroom<br />Puzzles/Brain teasers:<br />Crossword: learning spelling or specific topics<br />Sudoku: learning math<br />Mahjong: recollection skills<br />Business Games<br />Mythical business company for older students<br />Practice buying/selling at a grocery store for younger students<br />Jeopardy: learning specific topics<br />
  • 6. The Final Outcome<br />Students are surrounded by games outside of the classroom, so it would only make sense to bring games into the classroom.<br />Students want to achieve success and so they want to repeatedly play a game, develop an understanding, and ultimately succeed.<br />
  • 7. Gaming Resources<br />Teachers have many resources available to them for gaming:<br />PC games such as “Brain Games”<br />Board games<br />Freeonlinegames.com<br />Their own mind; ie. Make up your own game<br />
  • 8. References<br />Smaldino, S. E., Lowther, D. L., & Russell, J. D. (2008). Instructional technology and media for learning (9th ed.). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Education, Inc.<br />

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