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Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists
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Federalists Vs. Anti Federalists

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  • 1. Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists <ul><li>Essential Questions: </li></ul><ul><li>What was the controversy surrounding the new Constitution? </li></ul><ul><li>Who were the Federalists and Anti-Federalist? </li></ul><ul><li>What were the Federalists Papers? </li></ul><ul><li>How did the Federalist Papers shape the debate surrounding ratification of the new Constitution? </li></ul>
  • 2. Controversy Over the Constitution <ul><li>When the Constitution was printed in the newspapers people were shocked </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Delegates created a new constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Framers setup a procedure to ratify the Constitution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Each state held a special convention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Voters elected delegates to convention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Delegates would then vote to accept or reject the Constitution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ratification (official approval) required agreement of at least 9 states </li></ul></ul><ul><li>System bypassed the state legislatures </li></ul><ul><ul><li>They were likely to oppose the new Constitution since it limited the powers of the states </li></ul></ul>
  • 3. The Federalists <ul><li>Eventually two groups emerged, one supported the new constitution, the other opposed its ratification </li></ul><ul><li>The Federalists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporters of the Constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Liked how the Constitution balanced power between the states and the national government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Believed separation of powers and the system of checks and balances would protect Americans from tyranny of a centralized authority </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. The Anti-Federalists <ul><li>Anti-Federalists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Opposed the new Constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Were against having a strong central government </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feared government would serve interests of privileged minority </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Feared central government would ignore rights of majority </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Said a single government could not manage the affairs of such a large country </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Their biggest problem was that the Constitution lacked any protection for individual rights </li></ul>
  • 5. Opposing Forces <ul><li>Federalists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>George Washington, James Madison, and Alexander Hamilton </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Received heavy support from urban centers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Merchants, skilled workers, and laborers saw the benefit of a national government that could regulate trade </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Anti-Federalists </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Patrick Henry, Samuel Adams, and Richard Henry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Received support from rural areas, where people feared a strong government that might add to their tax burden </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. The Federalist Papers <ul><li>Both sides waged a war of words over the adoption of the Constitution </li></ul><ul><li>“ The Federalist Papers” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Series of 85 essays defending the Constitution </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appeared in NY newspapers between 1787 and 1788 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They were published under the pseudonym “Publius” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Were written by Hamilton, Madison, and Jay </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provided an analysis and explanation of Constitutional provisions and concepts </li></ul></ul>
  • 7. Letter From the Federal Farmer <ul><li>Was the leading Anti-Federalist publication </li></ul><ul><li>Written by Richard Henry Lee </li></ul><ul><ul><li>He listed the rights the Anti-Federalists believed should be protected: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom of Speech </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom of Press </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Freedom of Religion </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Guarantees against unreasonable searches of people and their homes </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Right to a trial by jury </li></ul></ul></ul>

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