The MAANZ MXpress Program
Understanding the Service Product
Dr Brian Monger
Copyright July 2013.
This Power Point program ...
MAANZ International
• MAANZ International, is a Not for Profit, internet based 
professional and educational institute whi...
Dr. Brian Monger
• Brian Monger is the CEO of MAANZ International and a 
Professional marketer and consultant with over 45...
4
Services Marketing: Understanding the 
Service Product
• It has been suggested that the traditional marketing distinctio...
5
A Reminder ‐ What is Marketing About?
• The marketing concept may appear in different guises ‐ some 
simple, some comple...
6
A Reminder ‐ What is Marketing About?
(c) To continue to do these things the organisation must 
generate revenue which e...
7
The Importance of Service
• The statement 'Service is everybody's business' is a marketing truism. Even 
highly tangible...
8
Service and Customers
• The major purpose of any business activity – regardless of 
whether it is situated in the consum...
9
Defining Services
• Perhaps ‐ A Marketed Service ‐A market transaction by an 
individual or organisation where the prima...
10
The Early Stage of Services Marketing ‐ Differentiating between Products 
(goods) and Services
• One of the earliest an...
11
Intangibility
• Strictly speaking, a service is of course intangible.  Services 
have no form and are therefore intangi...
12
Pure Service
Intangible Dominant
Pure Product
Tangible Dominant
Haircut
Salt
A Mixture of Both
Teaching
Airline
Adverti...
13
Inseparability
• The general thought, particularly back in the 70's was that 
services (being person created) must be p...
14
Heterogeneity ‐ Variability
• Whereas the processes involved in the manufacture of goods 
can be closely checked and co...
15
Perishability
• It appeared obvious that physical products can be stored and 
stockpiled, whilst intangible services co...
16
Ownership.
• It is suggested that the lack of the physical prevents actual 
ownership because a customer may only have ...
17
Are they Different?
• There is a significant body of literature to support the premise 
that "products and services“ (a...
18
Are Services Really Different?
• Shostack  and others argued that services' marketing requires 
a totally different app...
19
Are Services Really Different?
• From a perspective of simple logic it is hard to understand 
how any product could exi...
20
The Alternative View
• More recent writers (for example Christian Gronroos and Edvard 
Gummerson) question the validity...
21
My View
• I suggested back in 1995 that all products are essentially 
services which use tangibles to affect the delive...
22
All Products Are Largely Service 
(Intangible Value) Based
• It seems logical that services are not something distinctl...
23
Another Look at the Standard List ‐ Which 
attempts to differentiate services
• The List:
• Intangibility
• Inseparabil...
24
Intangibility ‐ 'Services lack 
substance/tangibility'
• The idea is that services are essentially intangible.  It is n...
Intangibility ‐ 'Services lack 
substance/tangibility
• Christian Gronroos even suggests that goods are not really 
tangib...
26
Inseparability‐ 'Services are only available 
directly from the provider'
• It is suggested that Services cannot be sep...
27
Heterogeneity ‐ 'Services lack consistency'
• Services are often described as being heterogeneous ‐ that is being varia...
28
Perishability ‐ 'Services cannot be stored'
• Most texts state that Services are perishable and cannot be 
stored.  Thi...
29
Ownership ‐ 'Services cannot be owned'
• Many writers have suggested that lack of physical ownership 
is a basic differ...
30
Ownership
• Does value acquisition (ownership) actually require physical possession?  
Is the only form of value to be ...
31
Products represent the Benefits People Buy
• Of course the list does suggest some things that are worth 
thinking about...
32
Other Views of Services
33
Services are Co‐created
• Another suggested feature of a service is that the value 
derived is often dependent upon the...
34
But ‐ Is There Always a Direct Interaction?
• There are situations where the customer does not interact 
with the servi...
35
Interaction Creates Value With All Products
• One of the reasons that understanding service marketing is of 
interest t...
36
A Greater Need to Manage Demand
• Of course some of the older differentiating factors on the list do apply to 
certain ...
37
Service Reputation May Be Individually 
Specific
• Where the basis of the product provided is by one person, the 
value...
38
Many (Inseparable) Services Cannot be 
Returned to the Provider
• Except where the product was provided in a stored for...
39
Guarantees and
Warranties
Cars; Appliances
Maintenance
Cars
Equipment
Buildings
Repairs
Warranty repairs
Non warranty r...
40
Services are Performed (Not produced)
• Services are performed; they are not produced. From serving at table, to 
makin...
41
No Resale Value (No second‐hand market)
• There is 'futures value' only, but very little 'residual value' (if 
any) in ...
42
Enabling (The prime function of any 
service)
• A service will enable the customer to obtain the benefits they 
seek. 
...
43
Inter‐customer Influence (Who else is 
being served by that provider?)
• The prospect may not be able to sample a servi...
44
The Intellectual‐Operational Service Spectrum
Similar to the Products‐Services Continuum and 
probably more useful is t...
45
The Balance Between Manual Skills vs. 
Intellectual Content.
• At the bottom left of the spectrum, the service is domin...
• For more information about MAANZ International and articles 
about Marketing, visit:
• www.marketing.org.au
• http://sma...
47
END
MAANZ MXPress Program
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Marketing services1 [compatibility mode]

650 views

Published on

Marketing Services

Published in: Business, News & Politics
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
650
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Marketing services1 [compatibility mode]

  1. 1. The MAANZ MXpress Program Understanding the Service Product Dr Brian Monger Copyright July 2013. This Power Point program and the associated documents remain the intellectual property and the copyright of the author and of The Marketing Association of Australia and New Zealand Inc. These notes may be used only for personal study and not in any education or training program. Persons and/or corporations wishing to use these notes for any other purpose should contact MAANZ for written permission.
  2. 2. MAANZ International • MAANZ International, is a Not for Profit, internet based  professional and educational institute which has operated for  over 25 years. • MAANZ International offers Professional  Memberships; • Marketing Courses (Formal and Short) • And Marketing Publications • www.marketing.org.au  2
  3. 3. Dr. Brian Monger • Brian Monger is the CEO of MAANZ International and a  Professional marketer and consultant with over 45 years  experience. Marketing In Black and White 3
  4. 4. 4 Services Marketing: Understanding the  Service Product • It has been suggested that the traditional marketing distinctions made  between goods and services may not be helpful for marketing purposes. • Ultimately all products are bought or used to solve problems and provide  customer benefits.  Also all products are composed of tangible and  intangible elements.   • The distinction between goods and services is blurred. • However organisations which market products where the intangible  elements are more obviously dominant in the make‐up of the product,  may have special problems in adapting marketing ideas and practices.
  5. 5. 5 A Reminder ‐ What is Marketing About? • The marketing concept may appear in different guises ‐ some  simple, some complex; but it is essentially about the following  few things which contribute towards an organisation's  success: • (a)  To obtain its own objectives, an organisation has to create  a value proposition that will win and a customer.  The  customer should be central to everything the organisation  does. (b) To win and to keep a customer the organisation has to  create, produce and deliver goods and services that their  target market wants and values.  Such products should be  created, produced and delivered under conditions that are  relatively attractive to customers compared with those  offered by competitors.  
  6. 6. 6 A Reminder ‐ What is Marketing About? (c) To continue to do these things the organisation must  generate revenue which exceeds costs and which is of  sufficient size and which arises with sufficient regularity to  attract, keep and develop capital for the organisation and to  keep, at least abreast and, sometimes ahead of, competitive  offerings.  . • In essence then, marketing is an attitude of mind; it is a way  of organising the enterprise; it is a range of activities which  will employ tools and techniques in the process of identifying,  anticipating and satisfying customer requirements.
  7. 7. 7 The Importance of Service • The statement 'Service is everybody's business' is a marketing truism. Even  highly tangible products have intangible elements that enhance consumer  satisfaction with the sale. Therefore, all marketers need to manage  services.  Every organisation faces service competition.   • Service is the essence of value.  • Services marketing is used to market any product (goods or  service). • All organisational results focus on successful marketing activities. • While all the business elements listed above are important, without a  market, without someone to sell to or exchange with, there can be no  business.
  8. 8. 8 Service and Customers • The major purpose of any business activity – regardless of  whether it is situated in the consumer, B2B, services, social or  not for profit sectors – is to acquire and keep customers  through the exchange process by continually fulfilling  customer needs and wants. 
  9. 9. 9 Defining Services • Perhaps ‐ A Marketed Service ‐A market transaction by an  individual or organisation where the primary object of the  transaction is focused on the non tangible aspects of the  product (Monger B Services Marketing Notes MAANZ 1997) • Evert Gummeson (1987) defines services as anything that  cannot be dropped on your foot.
  10. 10. 10 The Early Stage of Services Marketing ‐ Differentiating between Products  (goods) and Services • One of the earliest and probably the leading papers to be written on this  topic was by G Lyn Shostack  The best known of which is "Breaking free  from product marketing",(1977)  Journal of Marketing, Vol 41 (April ), pp  73 ‐ 80. • The Shostack’s article talks about the nature of services and is one of the  first academic papers to argue that services are relatively intangible and  that it is this intangibility that differentiates services from goods.  • Shostack may have been the first of the numerous writers who have  suggested that the offers of services marketers differed from the  marketers of tangible goods in the following key ways: • Intangibility • Inseparability • Heterogeneity • Perishability • Ownership
  11. 11. 11 Intangibility • Strictly speaking, a service is of course intangible.  Services  have no form and are therefore intangible. The problem for  Shostack and other similar writers arises however, was that  few products (goods) were completely tangible and few  services could be seen as completely intangible.  • The Product‐Service continuum was first published in 1977  and has been widely and fairly exclusively used since that  time. The theory, which supports the tangibility continuum, is  such that there can be a perfectly intangible service and a  perfectly intangible service ‐ all products having greater or  lesser degrees of intangibility. 
  12. 12. 12 Pure Service Intangible Dominant Pure Product Tangible Dominant Haircut Salt A Mixture of Both Teaching Airline Advertising Restaurant Cars Detergent Cosmetics Product Service Continuum
  13. 13. 13 Inseparability • The general thought, particularly back in the 70's was that  services (being person created) must be produced and  consumed at the same time and as such both the consumer  and the service provider have to be present at the same time  for the service to be performed and experienced. • Often the simultaneous presence of the producer and the  consumer will mean that a direct sale is often the only form of  distribution possible.  • Most services were thought incapable of being mass  produced in the way that many goods are such as bottled soft  drink is, so the operation of many service providers tended to  be thought of as limited in scale.
  14. 14. 14 Heterogeneity ‐ Variability • Whereas the processes involved in the manufacture of goods  can be closely checked and controlled to ensure consistent  quality, the monitoring of processes involved in the  production of services cannot ensure that services are  delivered at the same level of quality on a consistent basis. • It was considered extremely difficult to achieve a standardised  output with services because the processes of services  generally comprise the involvement of people – the service  provider and the consumer. 
  15. 15. 15 Perishability • It appeared obvious that physical products can be stored and  stockpiled, whilst intangible services could not.  • An unsold hotel room can not be put back into stock the  following day if it fails to sell. When the night is over so too is  the opportunity to sell that room.
  16. 16. 16 Ownership. • It is suggested that the lack of the physical prevents actual  ownership because a customer may only have access to or use  of a service, like say a facility e.g. a hotel room or a credit card  or an accounting service and does not get permanent  ownership. 
  17. 17. 17 Are they Different? • There is a significant body of literature to support the premise  that "products and services“ (actually as economics says ‐ the  term product includes both goods and services ‐ it is only  marketers who got the terms consistently wrong) are  different.  • These notional differences are persistently identified in light  of the previous list of characteristics of services. The writers  concentrating on the marketing of services continue to  suggest that marketers have to look at services differently and  as such the development the marketing strategy will be quite  unique and different from the marketing strategy of goods.
  18. 18. 18 Are Services Really Different? • Shostack  and others argued that services' marketing requires  a totally different approach and different concepts compared  with goods' marketing. 
  19. 19. 19 Are Services Really Different? • From a perspective of simple logic it is hard to understand  how any product could exist without a combination of both  tangibles (goods) and intangibles (labour and services).  • The concept that salt is pure good (product) does not address  the numerous value adding service activities (such as  marketing ‐ packaging, labelling, distribution, branding,  promotion) that are required to offer it as a saleable product.   • The same is true of a "pure service" like the haircut which  requires goods and other tangibles (scissors, salon  hairdresser) to the make the service available.  How could a  service actually be exchanged without some form of  tangibility?  
  20. 20. 20 The Alternative View • More recent writers (for example Christian Gronroos and Edvard  Gummerson) question the validity and practicality of the previous  attempts at goods/services differentiation.   • Christian Gronroos 1989  believes that traditional perspective of services  marketing has little to offer organisations even in the service sector and  that the view of services as something provided only by a certain type of  organisation is probably an outdated one, which limits understanding and  usefulness. It gives the wrong signal about the importance of services in  all situations and about the impact of services competitiveness.  • Edvard Gummerson states “there is no practical advantage in continuing  to try to define services in a separate way”  
  21. 21. 21 My View • I suggested back in 1995 that all products are essentially  services which use tangibles to affect the delivery of value.   (Monger1995).  I have found no reason to alter that view  since. • The main benefits (from a buyer/user perspective) of any  product are the intangible ones ‐ services the product  provides or services attached to the product.    • These provide the satisfaction and value sought in the  marketing exchange.   • Basically what the tangible product factors provide is the  vehicle for the intangible satisfactions to be delivered and  provide value to the buyer.
  22. 22. 22 All Products Are Largely Service  (Intangible Value) Based • It seems logical that services are not something distinctly different or  separate from a product or a different class of products.  Customers do  not buy a product or a service ‐ (goods or services); they buy the entire  value proposition the (mostly intangible) benefits all products provide  them with.' They buy offerings consisting of goods, services, information,  image, personal attention and other components.  • In the final analysis organisations always offer a service to customers,  regardless of what they produce. (Gronroos 2000) • The value of goods and services to customers is produced both in factories  and in the back offices of service organisations, in service delivery  encounters as well as when users make use of the product they have  purchased. 
  23. 23. 23 Another Look at the Standard List ‐ Which  attempts to differentiate services • The List: • Intangibility • Inseparability • Heterogeneity • Perishability • Ownership
  24. 24. 24 Intangibility ‐ 'Services lack  substance/tangibility' • The idea is that services are essentially intangible.  It is not possible to  taste, feel, see, hear or smell services before they are purchased.  Services  do not cast a shadow. • If the core of any offering is a service, then it is reasonable to suggest that  it will be difficult to sell because in being intangible, it can only be  imagined.  With all service products, there must always be tangible things  associated to carry and represent the service, such as a credit card, an  insurance policy, people and/or premises.  
  25. 25. Intangibility ‐ 'Services lack  substance/tangibility • Christian Gronroos even suggests that goods are not really  tangibles, in the perceptions of customers. Products such as  tomatoes or a car are always primarily perceived in subjective  and intangible ways and in terms of the services they will  provide (its not just a car or a tomato). If a restaurant provides  a service is it so different to a can of precooked food? Hence,  the intangibility characteristic does not distinguish services  from physical goods as clearly as is usually stated in the  literature.  Some products are harder to understand than  others.
  26. 26. 26 Inseparability‐ 'Services are only available  directly from the provider' • It is suggested that Services cannot be separated from the  person of the provider.  A corollary of this is that creating or  performing the service may only occur at the same time as  full or partial consumption of it (production and consumption  must be simultaneous).  It is suggested that goods are  produced, sold and then consumed whereas services are sold  and then produced and consumed.   • Of course some services are time specific and cannot be  stored (an airline flight).  Others like teaching and  entertainment can be fully or partially stored ‐ for example by  recording ‐ video tapes/DVDs even books and therefore can  be separated.  Banking services are in part now stored by an  ATM.
  27. 27. 27 Heterogeneity ‐ 'Services lack consistency' • Services are often described as being heterogeneous ‐ that is being variable or not  having consistency or being capable of standardisation of output.  This would be  explained as a service provided to one customer not being exactly the same as the  same service to the next customer. The lack of homogeneity (sameness) of  services can create problems in service management in how to maintain an evenly  perceived quality of the services produced and rendered to customers.  It is often  difficult to achieve standardisation of output in services.   • This concept of course only applies to people produced services and forgets the  fact that many services are now provided by a range of technologies ‐ for example  ATM's, vending machines as well as the internet and via computer software The  key aspect of such services being delivered, that they are heterogeneous.  A  machine could not do anything but deliver the same service.   • Highly standardised human delivered services are also possible.  At McDonald's  and a range of service providers, customers receive almost exactly the same  treatment. 
  28. 28. 28 Perishability ‐ 'Services cannot be stored' • Most texts state that Services are perishable and cannot be  stored.  This directly links with what was said in the last two  examples.   • While some services are perishable many services are not and  can be stored.  Service as software is an example where the  original activity is stored and used many times.  There are  degrees of perishability in all value offers
  29. 29. 29 Ownership ‐ 'Services cannot be owned' • Many writers have suggested that lack of physical ownership  is a basic difference between a service industry and a goods  industry because a customer may only have access to or use  of a service, like say a facility e.g. a hotel room or a credit card  not permanent ownership.  They suggest payment is for the  use of, access to or hire of items.  With the sale of a tangible  good, the buyer has possession and full use of the product.   • This really points out the fundamental difference in approach  between the style adopted by previous writers and the more  modern one.  
  30. 30. 30 Ownership • Does value acquisition (ownership) actually require physical possession?   Is the only form of value to be found in physical possession?  Not really.   Value is a perceptual factor.  People pay for the value they perceive they  will get from an exchange, even if they cannot touch the resultant product  of that exchange.  A very good example is people who give money to  charity.  They mostly do so to feel better to have a sense of making a  contribution to a better world.  They do not receive anything much more  than a good feeling.  This is much the same as one looks for in purchasing  anything ‐ from a car to an accounting service.  Lack of actual ownership is  not limited to services either.  Obviously the hire of car provides  ownership like benefits as well.
  31. 31. 31 Products represent the Benefits People Buy • Of course the list does suggest some things that are worth  thinking about.  But they are simply not enough to manage  the Marketing of Services in a totally different way • Ultimately all products are bought or used to solve problems  and provide customer benefits.  Also all products are  composed of both tangible and intangible elements. 
  32. 32. 32 Other Views of Services
  33. 33. 33 Services are Co‐created • Another suggested feature of a service is that the value  derived is often dependent upon the skills, knowledge and  participation of the buyer as of the seller.   • Services are indeed very often relational. A service encounter,  for example where a customer is a restaurant guest or makes  a telephone call, is a process. • In this process the service provider is undertaking a form,  interaction with the customer.  A customers interaction with a  good is also an activity ‐ a service (spaghetti needs cooking to  realise its full value).  
  34. 34. 34 But ‐ Is There Always a Direct Interaction? • There are situations where the customer does not interact  with the service provider organisation. For example, a  plumber goes into an apartment to fix a leak when the tenant  is out; there are no immediate interactions between the  plumber, his physical resources or systems of operating and  the customer. • However, in all cases the service process does lead to some  form of co‐operation between customer and service provider.  Some form relationship must emerge. 
  35. 35. 35 Interaction Creates Value With All Products • One of the reasons that understanding service marketing is of  interest to producers and sellers of tangible goods is that  customers are now more often involved in various processes  of the manufacturer such as the design of goods, modular  production, delivery, maintenance, helpdesk functions,  information share and a host of other processes which in  today's competitive environment have become important for  the creation of a competitive advantage. All these activities  bring the manufacturing of goods and service management  closer to each other.
  36. 36. 36 A Greater Need to Manage Demand • Of course some of the older differentiating factors on the list do apply to  certain products.   • Some types of organisations find it difficult if not impossible to store their  service product to meet fluctuations in demand. There may be no simple  manufacturing changes that can be used to adapt supply of the services to  demand fluctuations.   • Often, therefore, services organisations are concerned with managing  demand.  Indeed, where demand for the services provided is excessive, a  strategy of demarketing' may be pursued where organisations may  actively discourage customers on a permanent or a temporary basis.   • Other strategies may seek to synchronise supply and demand to even out  irregularities in supply and demand by offering discounts for off peak use  (electricity and airlines flights for example).
  37. 37. 37 Service Reputation May Be Individually  Specific • Where the basis of the product provided is by one person, the  value of the service may be based on the reputation of that  person.   • This also applies to services that produce tailored goods (a  photograph, a suit or a sculpture)
  38. 38. 38 Many (Inseparable) Services Cannot be  Returned to the Provider • Except where the product was provided in a stored form (and  even then there may be problem with services like software),  buyers cannot return services (e.g. a haircut)
  39. 39. 39 Guarantees and Warranties Cars; Appliances Maintenance Cars Equipment Buildings Repairs Warranty repairs Non warranty repairs Less Skilled Cleaning Guards Skilled Teaching Consulting Childcare Professional Doctor Lawyer Engineer Vending Machines More Skilled Airlines Computer operations Lower Skilled Drycleaning Taxis Lawnmowing Product Related Equipment Based Personal Skill Related Electronic Communication Based Internet Computer based and Other Electronic ATMs Kiosks Views of Services
  40. 40. 40 Services are Performed (Not produced) • Services are performed; they are not produced. From serving at table, to  making a plea in court, in the sense that the service is a deed being  conducted (for the customer) at a given moment in time, it is all a  performance. • The often 'real time' nature of the performance also means that a service  is highly flexible.  • At best it can be tailored to suit the particular customer being served.  • At worst there is the danger of a wide variation in delivery leading to  difficulties in quality control and also lack of a consistent identity across  service deliverers and outlets.  • The service marketer must manage this variability to advantage via the  use of performance standards and evaluation systems. 
  41. 41. 41 No Resale Value (No second‐hand market) • There is 'futures value' only, but very little 'residual value' (if  any) in a service.   • A barrister's advice to a client is situation specific and could  not, with confidence, be sold to another person by that client.
  42. 42. 42 Enabling (The prime function of any  service) • A service will enable the customer to obtain the benefits they  seek.  • Where the service is used to add value to a good, this  'enabling' may often be the main way in which the benefits  are provided, for example, a personal computer for the home  office is just a hunk of metal, silicone and plastic without the  installation, training and hotline support most people need. • All products (goods or services) enable benefits to be  obtained, this is not unique to services.. Enablement is the  services' raison d'etre, a fact frequently forgotten.
  43. 43. 43 Inter‐customer Influence (Who else is  being served by that provider?) • The prospect may not be able to sample a service but they  can talk to people who have (and have experienced delivery  of) any of the above examples. They can thus discover if these  customers were satisfied and form an opinion of how likely it  is that they too will be satisfied. • Some types of service are delivered in a social context.  • For these the management of how one customer may be  affected by, or may affect other customers, is an important  aspect for the service marketer to manage.
  44. 44. 44 The Intellectual‐Operational Service Spectrum Similar to the Products‐Services Continuum and  probably more useful is the 'Services Spectrum' shown below. Restaurants Tourism Transport Waste Disposal Financial Services ((Banks; Insurance) Film andTelevision Production Training Graphics Design Health Care Consulting Specialist Advice Professional Advice Manual and Operational Skills Dominant Intellectual Skills and Intellectual Property Dominant Objective Focus Subjective Focus
  45. 45. 45 The Balance Between Manual Skills vs.  Intellectual Content. • At the bottom left of the spectrum, the service is dominated  by physical  and operational skills, it is mainly the  performance of a manual skill of some kind, cooking, serving  at table, chiropody etc. This is not to say that there are no  intellectual skills involved, but these are in support of the  manual task which is physical. • Whilst at the top right of the spectrum the situation is  reversed. The service is mainly about what the practitioner  knows, their intellectual property.  • Though many practitioners at this end of the spectrum are in  the 'Professions', significant manual skills may be involved,  such as in: surgery, 
  46. 46. • For more information about MAANZ International and articles  about Marketing, visit: • www.marketing.org.au • http://smartamarketing.wordpress.com • http://smartamarketing2.wordpress.com • .  http://www.linkedin.com/groups/MAANZ‐ SmartaMarketing‐Group‐2650856/about • Email: info@marketing.org.au • Link to this site ‐ ‐ http://www.slideshare.net/bmonger for  further presentations Marketing In Black and White 46
  47. 47. 47 END MAANZ MXPress Program

×