Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Point of view and perspective
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Point of view and perspective

2,286
views

Published on

Published in: Education, Spiritual, Technology

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,286
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
52
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Point of View and Perspective
  • 2. Dialogue and Narration
    • Dialogue
      • When the characters speak
    • Narration
      • When the narrator speaks
    • “Quotation marks” separate narration from dialogue.
      • “Help” my cousin Jack Said.
  • 3. Point of View
    • Five types of point of view:
      • 1 st Person
      • 2 nd Person
      • 3 rd Person Limited
      • 3 rd Person Omniscient
      • 3 rd Person Objective
  • 4. Point of View
    • 1 st Person
      • I, me, my, we, our…
      • Story is told from a main character’s POV
      • Benefits
        • Readers see events from the perspective of an important character
        • Readers often understand the main character better
  • 5. Point of View
    • 1 st Person
      • Drawbacks
        • Narrator may be unreliable-insane, naïve, deceptive, narrow minded
        • Readers see only one perspective which makes the story very limited
  • 6. Point of View
    • 1 st Person (Cont’d)
      • “ True—nervous—very dreadfully nervous I had been and am; but why will you say that I am mad? The disease had sharpened my sense—not destroyed—not dulled them. Above all was the sense of hearing acute. I heard all things in the heaven and in the earth.
        • Edgar Alle Poe, “The Tell-Tale Heart” (1850)
  • 7. Point of View
    • 2 nd Person
      • You, yours, your, yourself
      • A second-person POV is rare
      • Uses “you” and present command
      • Often the narrator is speaking to him/herself
  • 8. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person
      • Omniscient
      • Limited
      • Objective
  • 9. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person
      • Omniscient
        • All knowing
        • The narrator can see into the minds of all characters
        • Godlike narrator
          • He/she can enter character's minds and know everything that is going, past, present, and future
          • May be a narrator outside the text
  • 10. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person Omniscient
      • Very natural technique
      • Author is after all omniscient regarding his/her work
      • Disadvantage
        • Not lifelike
          • Narrator knows and tells all
          • Is truly a convention of literature
  • 11. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person Omniscient
      • “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair…”
        • Charles Dickens, A Tale of Two Cities (1859)
  • 12. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person
      • Limited
        • Narrator can see into ONE character’s mind
        • All characters have thought privacy except ONE
        • Gives the impression that we are very close to the mind of that ONE character, though viewing it from a distance
        • Sometimes this narrator can be too focused or may impose his/her own opinions with no grounds
  • 13. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person Limited Omniscient
      • “ The girl he loved was shy and quick with the smallest in the class, and usually she said noting, but one day she opened her mouth and roa, and when the teacher—it was French class—asked her what she was doing, she said, in French, I am a lion…”
        • Elizabeth Graver, “The Boy who fell Forty Feet” (1993)
  • 14. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person
      • Objective
        • Narrator only describes and does not enter the characters’ thoughts
        • Like a video camera, the narrator reports what happens and what the characters are saying
        • The narrator adds no comment about how the characters are feeling
        • The narrator offers no comment on the mood of the setting-no mention of awkwardness, ease, tension, ect….
  • 15. Point of View
    • 3 rd Person Objective
      • “The morning of June 27 th was clear and sunny, with fresh warmth of a full-summer day; the flowers were blossoming profusely and the grass was richly green. The people of the village began to gather in the square, between the post office and the bank, around ten o’clock…”
        • Shirley Jackson, “The Lottery” (1948)
  • 16. Point of View
    • Review:
      • Point of view=Who is telling the story and how much they contribute
      • 1 st Person
        • I, Me, My, We, Our
      • 2 nd Person
        • You, Your Yours, Yourself
  • 17. Point of View
    • Review
      • 3 rd Person
        • Omniscient
          • All knowing
          • The narrator can see into the minds of all characters
          • Godlike narrator
        • Limited
          • Narrator can see into ONE character’s mind
          • All characters have thought privacy except ONE
        • Objective
          • Narrator only describes and does not enter the characters’ thoughts