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Barbara Holtmann Presentation Washington May 3 2011
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Barbara Holtmann Presentation Washington May 3 2011

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  • Dr. Holtmann, I thoroughly enjoyed this presentation although its two years old, it is very valid. I am currently chairing an initiative (not as broad spectrum as yours) in northern Canada with two Aboriginal Communities, oil sands industry companies and governments - I would greatly enjoy an opportunity to have a conversation with you about our similar learnings.
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  • Security: defence or protection against a known or perceived threat.Safety: the need for less security.Not everything is about crime and violence; reduction of crime and violence is a by-product of improved resilience, health, community developmentLocal safety approaches require the perspectives, understanding and vision of local actors in collaborative, integrative approachesSafety strategies must overcome the fragile social systems that are the legacy of opressions and that perpetuate vulnerability and increase the risks of a cycle of crime and violenceUnsafety is the failure of a social system; thus it requires a systemic approach that embraces the complexity of the problem rather than trying to simplify itUnsafety is experienced at local level and should be addressed at local level The Safe Communities of Opportunity model reflects many common answers to “what does it look like when its fixed?”It elaborates the complex relationships amongst elements of safety elicited through community and expert consultation, review of literature and analysis of policy and strategic objectives.
  • The need to collect data often confounds action and prevents appropriate investmentIn many places, viable official data is cumbersome and impossible to verifyThe Safe Communities of Opportunity model asks people across a broad spectrum of socio economic circumstances to draw what it looks like when its fixed; they deliver similar visions Even the poorest people know the difference between reality and fantasy, their drawings are pragmatic; they describe a functional social system – its not asking for muchThey are right; the elements they draw as they answer the questions are the elements that are identified in our collective body of knowledge as being required for safetyWhat they don’t draw is security; they don’t draw armed men with guns at the gate or surveillance camerasThey draw places where people move freely, where children play in the streets and neighbours chat over picket fences, where the sun shines on old people sitting in the park, where the moon shines on women walking home from work at night
  • If provided with a simple set of indicators for each of those elements, they will score them in much the same way as a six month study might deliverOf course all consultation is flawed; this methodology of consensus building through collective design thinking is only as good as the people in the roomOf course all data is flawed; this methodology of rapid assessment will throw up anomalies but for the most part, it seems to be quite accurate and gives us a good-enough place to startAction plans focus on interventions where the elements score the lowest, the highest and where there is the greatest commitment to interventionThe second question is: if this is what it looks like when its fixed, how much do you value fixed? What will you sacrifice to get it and how much will you defend it if you do?The methodology delivers a social contract with actions bound to achieving the elementsWhere is the risk in this approach? It is in our perception of which information we can trust and when.The model is not a strategic plan, it is a picture. Its complexity is made less daunting by the number of role players who must contributeEveryone has a role to play, everyone is usefulNobody should tell anyone else what to do
  • Transcript

    • 1. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
      CHOOSING SAFETY
      Barbara Holtmann Washington 03 May 2011
    • 2. An Approach to Safety
      • Security: defence or protection against a known or perceived threat.
      • 3. Safety: the need for less security.
      • 4. Reduction of crime and violence is a by-product of improved resilience, health, community development, etc
      • 5. Local safety approaches require integrative approaches
      • 6. Safety strategies must trnsform fragile social
      • 7. Unsafety requires a systemic approach that embraces the complexity of the problem
      • 8. Unsafety is experienced and should be addressed at local level
      • 9. The Safe Communities of Opportunity model reflects many common answers to “what does it look like when its fixed?”
      • 10. It elaborates the complex relationships amongst elements of safety elicited through community and expert consultation, review of literature and analysis of policy and strategic objectives.
    • © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 11. Evidence Based or Evidence Led?
      In theory, we know a lot about unsafety, crime, violence, risk, vulnerability, resilience, safety. Yet in many places, this body of knowledge doesn’t translate into sustainable or sustained safety
      The bulk of spending aimed at safety is spent on security; in South Africa for instance, we spend more annually on private security than we earn from tourism; surveillance, target-hardening, guarding… these things are infinitely easier to fund than programmes that seek to encourage pro-social behaviour or to empower local people to live their best lives
      Arguments against investment in prevention are often based on spurious claims that these take too long to deliver; this is not so for the most vulnerable or those most at risk of offending
      Arguments for prevention often unwittingly support these claims; for instance that we should invest in today’s children because they are tomorrow’s leaders rather than because they are children
      Despite all our best efforts it seems there is not enough or compelling enough evidence to ensure appropriate investment in prevention, yet we continue to demand evidence based interventions
      We know for certain what does not work – the evidence is all around us
      We should use our impressive body of knowledge and community of practitioners to generate evidence led innovation on a grand scale
    • 12. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 13. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 14. When is information information?
      The need to collect data often confounds action and prevents appropriate investment
      In many places, viable official data is cumbersome and impossible to verify
      SCOP asks people to draw what it looks like when its fixed
      Even the poorest people know the difference between reality and fantasy
      They are right; the elements they draw are required for safety
      What they don’t draw is security
      They draw places where people move freely, where children play in the streets and neighbours chat over picket fences, where the sun shines on old people sitting in the park, where the moon shines on women walking home from work at night
    • 15. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 16. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 17. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 18. From vision to knowing what to do to get there
      Elements of the “fixed” can be scored by Rapid Assessment by the people in the room
      Consultation is flawed; this methodology of consensus building through collective design thinking is only as good as the people in the room
      Data is flawed; this methodology of rapid assessment will throw up anomalies but for the most part, it seems to be quite accurate and gives us a good-enough place to start
      Action plans focus on interventions where the elements score the lowest, the highest and where there is the greatest commitment to intervention
      The second question is: if this is what it looks like when its fixed, how much do you value fixed?
      Third: What will you sacrifice to get it and how much will you defend it if you do?
      The methodology delivers a social contract with actions bound to achieving the elements
      Where is the risk in this approach? It is in our perception of which information we can trust and when.
      The model is not a strategic plan, it is a picture. Its complexity is made less daunting by the number of role players who must contribute
      Everyone has a role to play, everyone is useful
      Nobody should tell anyone else what to do
    • 19.
    • 20.
    • 21. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 22. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 23. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 24. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 25. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 26. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 27. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 28. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 29. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 30. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 31. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 32. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 33. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 34. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
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    • 38. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 39. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 40. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
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    • 42. © CSIR 2006 www.csir.co.za
    • 43. Choosing Safety
      Sustainable safety should be our objective, not reducing crime and violence
      Since the benefits are greatest for the most vulnerable, their voices should have the greatest resonance in designing the outcomes, measuring the need, planning the actions and being useful in the transformation process
      We should care less about our individualized terms of reference and more about our collective impact
      We should base our work on a social contract that defines the value of our outcomes for everyone at the outset
      We need to measure social impact as a collective; does what we do have social impact?
      We should learn to trust the knowledge of people in the room; if they say we shifted things we should believe them, if they say we didn’t we should change what we do
      We should ask ourselves the hard philosophical questions: If we have a million dollars in the centre of the room, is a surveillance system the best we can offer?
      We should trust ourselves to lead towards sustainable safety through innovation.
      Thank You

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