ASHRAE Headquarters              Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons Building                  Empire State Building
 ...
Statistics
Statistics
• Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use
  (includes fuel input for production).
 Source: Environ...
Statistics
• Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use
  (includes fuel input for production).
 Source: Environ...
Statistics
• Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use
  (includes fuel input for production).
 Source: Environ...
Statistics
• Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use
  (includes fuel input for production).
 Source: Environ...
Designing High-Performance
Designing High-Performance

• ASHRAE Standard 189.1
   • First High-Performance Building Standard
Designing High-Performance

• ASHRAE Standard 189.1
   • First High-Performance Building Standard


• Advanced Energy Desi...
USGBC LEED Building Rating System
USGBC LEED Building Rating System
• High-Performance Building Rating System
USGBC LEED Building Rating System
• High-Performance Building Rating System

• Primary Driver of Green Buildings in U.S.
USGBC LEED Building Rating System
• High-Performance Building Rating System

• Primary Driver of Green Buildings in U.S.

...
Benchmarks
Benchmarks

• Energy Star
   • Energy-Based Benchmark
   • 120,000 Buildings (14 Billion SF)
   • 5,000 Partner Companies
Benchmarks

• Energy Star
   • Energy-Based Benchmark
   • 120,000 Buildings (14 Billion SF)
   • 5,000 Partner Companies
...
Goals
Goals

• ASHRAE Vision 2020
   • Standard 90.1 as Baseline Code
   • AEDG Net-Zero by 2022
   • 189.1 Net-Zero by 2031



...
Goals

• ASHRAE Vision 2020
   • Standard 90.1 as Baseline Code
   • AEDG Net-Zero by 2022
   • 189.1 Net-Zero by 2031



...
Regulating Performance
Regulating Performance

• All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010
   • Federal Buildings Requir...
Regulating Performance

• All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010
   • Federal Buildings Requir...
Regulating Performance

• All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010
   • Federal Buildings Requir...
Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take
  towards a greener, greater New York.

  ...
Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take
  towards a greener, greater New York.

 W...
Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take
  towards a greener, greater New York.

 W...
Green Wash?
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Green Wash?
• Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process

• Hesitation Towards Passive Design

• Lowest Cost to Get R...
Resources
• Organizations                                      • Resources
  
 ASHRAE                                     ...
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Green Buildings or Green Wash in the United States

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CIBSE / ASHRAE Group Worldwide Presentation on Green Buildings or Green Wash. This presentation focuses on efforts within the United States. Presented by Benny Skelton, Senior Building Specialist with Building Momentum Group.

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  • Thank You “Tim”. My name is Benny Skelton and I am a building performance specialist with with Building Momentum Group in Chicago. Green Buildings have certainly become a focus within the marketing community here in the United States, but are true green buildings being designed and operated? Before we get into that question, let us get an understanding the scale of our built environment.
  • The United States uses 21% of the total energy consumption in the World. Nearly 40% of our energy consumption is due to buildings.

    It is being predicted that green building construction in the United States will more than double between now and 2013.

    A recent survey of building owners indicated that 82% expect to to do “some greening” of their real estate portfolios. “Some Greening” is a relative term as a small percentage of an immense quantity of buildings is still a lot of buildings.

    However new buildings only represent about 2% of the construction activity going forward. 86% of annual construction expenditures relate to existing buildings.

    So what is being done to green our built environment?
  • The United States uses 21% of the total energy consumption in the World. Nearly 40% of our energy consumption is due to buildings.

    It is being predicted that green building construction in the United States will more than double between now and 2013.

    A recent survey of building owners indicated that 82% expect to to do “some greening” of their real estate portfolios. “Some Greening” is a relative term as a small percentage of an immense quantity of buildings is still a lot of buildings.

    However new buildings only represent about 2% of the construction activity going forward. 86% of annual construction expenditures relate to existing buildings.

    So what is being done to green our built environment?
  • The United States uses 21% of the total energy consumption in the World. Nearly 40% of our energy consumption is due to buildings.

    It is being predicted that green building construction in the United States will more than double between now and 2013.

    A recent survey of building owners indicated that 82% expect to to do “some greening” of their real estate portfolios. “Some Greening” is a relative term as a small percentage of an immense quantity of buildings is still a lot of buildings.

    However new buildings only represent about 2% of the construction activity going forward. 86% of annual construction expenditures relate to existing buildings.

    So what is being done to green our built environment?
  • The United States uses 21% of the total energy consumption in the World. Nearly 40% of our energy consumption is due to buildings.

    It is being predicted that green building construction in the United States will more than double between now and 2013.

    A recent survey of building owners indicated that 82% expect to to do “some greening” of their real estate portfolios. “Some Greening” is a relative term as a small percentage of an immense quantity of buildings is still a lot of buildings.

    However new buildings only represent about 2% of the construction activity going forward. 86% of annual construction expenditures relate to existing buildings.

    So what is being done to green our built environment?
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • With new construction, the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating & Air-Conditioning Engineers has taken the lead in defining the design of green buildings. In January, ASHRAE along with the U.S. Green Building Council and the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America published Standard 189.1, a code-a-fiable standard for the design of high-performance buildings. The standard addresses a buildings site use, water efficiency, energy, materials and indoor environment.

    Advanced Energy Design Guides have been produced for small buildings, those where performance is typically ignored. The guides provide prescriptive methods for achieving advanced levels of energy savings without having to resort to detailed calculations or analysis. Currently the guides reduce energy 30% but are scheduled to be published every three years with 50%, 70% and Net-Zero targets respectively. ASHRAE provides these design guides for free.
  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The United States Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Rating System was created in 1995 largely based on the BREEAM program.

    Today, LEED stands as the definition of a green building in the US...

    ...with nearly 20,000 registered projects, over 4,000 certified buildings and nearly 20,000 member organizations. Rating systems are rapidly expanding beyond the typical offices to focus on schools, hospitals, retail, homes and neighborhood developments. LEED for Existing Buildings is providing a unique focus on the operations and maintenance practices of existing buildings. The success of LEED has created an environment of awareness for Green Buildings in the United States and LEED is rapidly expanding across the globe.

  • The Energy Star label is recognized by 75% of American’s and stands as the primary benchmark for existing building energy use in the United States. The system has 120,000 buildings in it’s database. The system is rapidly expanding due to the adoption of Energy Star in the LEED for Existing Building program as well as new mandates requiring energy disclosure in real estate transactions in Washington D.C. and California. Similar disclosure mandates are coming in New York City and many other States and Cities. Energy disclosure in real estate transactions is expected to spur a new energy efficiency revolution with existing buildings. ENERGY STAR partner companies in the commercial marketplace have helped prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to the electricity use of 60 million American homes every year.

    ASHRAE is currently developing a building labeling program that will provide both asset and operational ratings. The program is currently in a pilot phase where operational ratings are being collected and the asset rating system is being developed. The label is expected to be released in 2011 and will be the first major label available in the United States.
  • The Energy Star label is recognized by 75% of American’s and stands as the primary benchmark for existing building energy use in the United States. The system has 120,000 buildings in it’s database. The system is rapidly expanding due to the adoption of Energy Star in the LEED for Existing Building program as well as new mandates requiring energy disclosure in real estate transactions in Washington D.C. and California. Similar disclosure mandates are coming in New York City and many other States and Cities. Energy disclosure in real estate transactions is expected to spur a new energy efficiency revolution with existing buildings. ENERGY STAR partner companies in the commercial marketplace have helped prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to the electricity use of 60 million American homes every year.

    ASHRAE is currently developing a building labeling program that will provide both asset and operational ratings. The program is currently in a pilot phase where operational ratings are being collected and the asset rating system is being developed. The label is expected to be released in 2011 and will be the first major label available in the United States.
  • The Energy Star label is recognized by 75% of American’s and stands as the primary benchmark for existing building energy use in the United States. The system has 120,000 buildings in it’s database. The system is rapidly expanding due to the adoption of Energy Star in the LEED for Existing Building program as well as new mandates requiring energy disclosure in real estate transactions in Washington D.C. and California. Similar disclosure mandates are coming in New York City and many other States and Cities. Energy disclosure in real estate transactions is expected to spur a new energy efficiency revolution with existing buildings. ENERGY STAR partner companies in the commercial marketplace have helped prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to the electricity use of 60 million American homes every year.

    ASHRAE is currently developing a building labeling program that will provide both asset and operational ratings. The program is currently in a pilot phase where operational ratings are being collected and the asset rating system is being developed. The label is expected to be released in 2011 and will be the first major label available in the United States.
  • The Energy Star label is recognized by 75% of American’s and stands as the primary benchmark for existing building energy use in the United States. The system has 120,000 buildings in it’s database. The system is rapidly expanding due to the adoption of Energy Star in the LEED for Existing Building program as well as new mandates requiring energy disclosure in real estate transactions in Washington D.C. and California. Similar disclosure mandates are coming in New York City and many other States and Cities. Energy disclosure in real estate transactions is expected to spur a new energy efficiency revolution with existing buildings. ENERGY STAR partner companies in the commercial marketplace have helped prevent greenhouse gas emissions equal to the electricity use of 60 million American homes every year.

    ASHRAE is currently developing a building labeling program that will provide both asset and operational ratings. The program is currently in a pilot phase where operational ratings are being collected and the asset rating system is being developed. The label is expected to be released in 2011 and will be the first major label available in the United States.
  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • Goals for green buildings have never been more clear or more aggressive than they are today.

    ASHRAE has set the bar with their 2020 Sustainability Vision which outlines target energy consumption reductions all the way to net-zero energy for their high-performance design standards and guides between now and 2030.

    The United States Department of Energy has set their own goal of marketable net-zero energy commercial buildings by the year 2025 using these ASHRAE design standards and guides.

  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • The Federal Government sets the minimum standard for energy efficiency for States and they have taken a big step forward by requiring all State Energy codes to minimally comply with ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by the end of this year. That’s approximately a 40 to 45% energy efficiency increase over the previous minimum standard. All Federal buildings are required to achieve 30% savings over 90.1-2004 based on life-cycle cost.

    Potential new legislation looks to continue the push towards green. The American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 was approved in the House of Representatives last year and awaits furious debate in the Senate this Summer. Expected to pass with some concessions, the bill will be the most sweeping change in United States energy policy in decades. Among the highlights, the bill would require asset labels for all new buildings and will likely be the first bill to formerly address carbon caps.

    In March the first public draft of the International Green Construction Code was released. IGCC is based on ASHRAE Standard 189.1. The code, which is set to be publicly released in 2012 will co-exist with baseline building codes but will be used to define a high-performance building. Cities, States, corporations, and other building owners are contributing to the development of the code in anticipation of adopting it as their minimum standard.



  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • On the local level, 1026 Mayors and growing have pledged to The United States Conference of Mayors’ Climate Protection Agreement, that their cities will reduce carbon emissions below 1990’s level.

    In December of 2009, New York City proved that this pledge is more than political banter by enacting six laws called the Greener, Greater Buildings Plan. This plan is only a part of New York Cities larger PlaNYC which targets city-wide carbon reduction by 2030. The six laws represent the largest scale green building policy to date in the United States. New buildings are addressed through the energy code which will track ASHRAE targets. But the biggest requirements fall on existing buildings where all existing lighting will be required to meet energy code by 2025, tenant spaces over 929 SM (10,000 SF) must be submetered, all properties will require benchmark labels, and audits and retrocommissioning will have to be performed on all buildings over 4,645 SM (50,000 SF) every 10 years. This is approximately 22,000 buildings that account for 45% of New York City’s energy consumption.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • We certainly have green ambitions. We have set goals, created roadmaps, mandates, design guidance and recognition programs for green buildings, but all those don’t make it green.

    True high-performance green buildings are being restricted by our design process. Redundancy in design and cost control by contractors is restricting the ability to move beyond the norm. Important trade synergies are lost between concept and construction.

    Designers are hesitant to design passive technologies into buildings due to fear of liability.

    Owner insistency on the “lowest costs to get the label” has led to designers picking points from the LEED rating system rather than considering the design as a whole. We have very low energy costs throughout the United States so operational costs are not a primary driver for building design.

    Energy codes and minimum standards exist, but there are a lack of qualified inspectors to review designs and no enforcement once the building is in operation.

    Buildings aren’t being commissioned properly and are not given the chance to operate “Green”

    Out of sight, out of mind mentality prevails as we continue to design, construct and operate buildings without the ability to measure energy use.

    Those operating the buildings don’t have the tools or often the training to operate a modern high-performance green building. And operation of a building is a majority of it’s life-cycle cost.

    All of this has lead to skepticism of Green Buildings and their actual value. The public has a misconception that green buildings are those with solar panels, wind mills and the latest technology. As building specialists, we know all too well that those technologies are largely green wash, but non-sexy solutions don’t have market appeal.

    We are in a sea-change in the building industry today. The massive collapse of the world economy has brought down the conventional building construction market. While green buildings were mostly a wash before now, a new era of true-green buildings are budding out of the rubble and look to be the future. These buildings are being ushered the leaders who recognize corporate and social responsibility and are willing to learn lessons and bear costs in order to set the bar. Those who choose not to lead will ultimately follow either as technology and costs fall or when they are mandated to.

  • Thank you and you can visit my website at bmgsc.com for any of the resources noted in this presentation.
  • Green Buildings or Green Wash in the United States

    1. 1. ASHRAE Headquarters Richard J. Klarchek Information Commons Building Empire State Building Images Courtesy High Performance Buildings Magazine Green Buildings or Green Wash in the United States CIBSE / ASHRAE Group Worldwide Presentation May 12, 2010 Benjamin Skelton, P.E., LEED AP, CxA Building Momentum Group, LLC - Chicago USA bmgsc.com
    2. 2. Statistics
    3. 3. Statistics • Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use (includes fuel input for production). Source: Environmental Information Administration (2008). EIA Annual Energy Outlook.
    4. 4. Statistics • Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use (includes fuel input for production). Source: Environmental Information Administration (2008). EIA Annual Energy Outlook. • The overall green building market (both non-residential and residential) is likely to more than double from today’s $36-49 billion to $96-140 billion by 2013 (Source: McGraw Hill Construction (2009). Green Outlook 2009: Trends Driving Change.)
    5. 5. Statistics • Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use (includes fuel input for production). Source: Environmental Information Administration (2008). EIA Annual Energy Outlook. • The overall green building market (both non-residential and residential) is likely to more than double from today’s $36-49 billion to $96-140 billion by 2013 (Source: McGraw Hill Construction (2009). Green Outlook 2009: Trends Driving Change.) • By 2009, 82% of corporate America is expected to be greening at least 16% of their real estate portfolios; of these corporations, 18% will be greening more than 60% of their real estate portfolios (Source: McGraw Hill Construction (2007). Greening of Corporate America SmartMarket Report.)
    6. 6. Statistics • Buildings represent 38.9% of U.S. primary energy use (includes fuel input for production). Source: Environmental Information Administration (2008). EIA Annual Energy Outlook. • The overall green building market (both non-residential and residential) is likely to more than double from today’s $36-49 billion to $96-140 billion by 2013 (Source: McGraw Hill Construction (2009). Green Outlook 2009: Trends Driving Change.) • By 2009, 82% of corporate America is expected to be greening at least 16% of their real estate portfolios; of these corporations, 18% will be greening more than 60% of their real estate portfolios (Source: McGraw Hill Construction (2007). Greening of Corporate America SmartMarket Report.) • New construction only represents 2% of building programs. Approximately 86% of U.S. annual building construction expenditures relate to the renovation of existing buildings. (Source: Gordon Holness (2009). Energy Efficiency Guide for Existing Commercial Buildings.)
    7. 7. Designing High-Performance
    8. 8. Designing High-Performance • ASHRAE Standard 189.1 • First High-Performance Building Standard
    9. 9. Designing High-Performance • ASHRAE Standard 189.1 • First High-Performance Building Standard • Advanced Energy Design Guides • Prescriptive High-Performance Design for Typically Ignored Buildings All Graphics Courtesy ASHRAE
    10. 10. USGBC LEED Building Rating System
    11. 11. USGBC LEED Building Rating System • High-Performance Building Rating System
    12. 12. USGBC LEED Building Rating System • High-Performance Building Rating System • Primary Driver of Green Buildings in U.S.
    13. 13. USGBC LEED Building Rating System • High-Performance Building Rating System • Primary Driver of Green Buildings in U.S. • Statistics* • 19,188 Registered Projects • 4,444 Certified Projects • 19,957 Member Organizations All Graphics © U.S. Green Building Council, 2009 *http://www.usgbc.org/LEED/Project/CertifiedProjectList.aspx
    14. 14. Benchmarks
    15. 15. Benchmarks • Energy Star • Energy-Based Benchmark • 120,000 Buildings (14 Billion SF) • 5,000 Partner Companies
    16. 16. Benchmarks • Energy Star • Energy-Based Benchmark • 120,000 Buildings (14 Billion SF) • 5,000 Partner Companies • ASHRAE Building Energy Quotient • Beta Program (2011 Release) • Asset & Operational Rating
    17. 17. Goals
    18. 18. Goals • ASHRAE Vision 2020 • Standard 90.1 as Baseline Code • AEDG Net-Zero by 2022 • 189.1 Net-Zero by 2031 Graphic adapted from ASHRAE Vision 2020
    19. 19. Goals • ASHRAE Vision 2020 • Standard 90.1 as Baseline Code • AEDG Net-Zero by 2022 • 189.1 Net-Zero by 2031 Graphic adapted from ASHRAE Vision 2020 • Department of Energy NZEB by 2025 • Using ASHRAE Standards Graphic adapted from U.S. DOE
    20. 20. Regulating Performance
    21. 21. Regulating Performance • All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010 • Federal Buildings Required to Achieve 30% Savings Over Code Graphics Adapted from U.S. Department of Energy
    22. 22. Regulating Performance • All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010 • Federal Buildings Required to Achieve 30% Savings Over Code • H.R.2454 - American Clean Energy And Security Act of 2009 • Status: House Approved, Currently in Senate • Requires Building Labels for New Buildings • Addresses Carbon Graphics Adapted from U.S. Department of Energy
    23. 23. Regulating Performance • All State Energy Codes Must Meet ASHRAE 90.1-2004 by Dec. 30, 2010 • Federal Buildings Required to Achieve 30% Savings Over Code • H.R.2454 - American Clean Energy And Security Act of 2009 • Status: House Approved, Currently in Senate • Requires Building Labels for New Buildings • Addresses Carbon • International Green Construction Code • High-Performance Building Code • 2012 Release Graphics Adapted from U.S. Department of Energy
    24. 24. Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take towards a greener, greater New York. Working together, Mayor Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Quinn and her Action colleagues created a six-part plan to make our existing large buildings energy efficient. The City Council recently passed the four legislative components of the plan. This effort relies on existing technology only, and low-cost measures that have proven track records. This plan will ultimately save New Yorkers $700 million in energy costs annually, improve conditions for tenants, create 17,800 construction jobs, and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by almost 5% – the largest single advance towards our 30% goal. The New York City Council The City of New York Speaker Christine C. Quinn Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg A GREENER GREATER NEW YORK
    25. 25. Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take towards a greener, greater New York. Working together, Mayor Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Quinn and her Action colleagues created a six-part plan to make our existing large buildings energy efficient. The City Council recently passed the four legislative components of the plan. This effort relies on existing technology only, and low-cost measures that have proven track records. • The U.S. Conference of Mayors' Climate Protection Agreement • Reduce Carbon Emissions Below 1990’s Level (Kyoto Protocol) This plan will ultimately save New Yorkers $700 million in energy costs annually, improve • 1026 Mayors conditions for tenants, create 17,800 construction jobs, and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by almost 5% – the largest single advance towards our 30% goal. The New York City Council The City of New York Speaker Christine C. Quinn Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg A GREENER GREATER NEW YORK
    26. 26. Making these existing buildings energy efficient is the biggest step we can take towards a greener, greater New York. Working together, Mayor Bloomberg and City Council Speaker Quinn and her Action colleagues created a six-part plan to make our existing large buildings energy efficient. The City Council recently passed the four legislative components of the plan. This effort relies on existing technology only, and low-cost measures that have proven track records. • The U.S. Conference of Mayors' Climate Protection Agreement • Reduce Carbon Emissions Below 1990’s Level (Kyoto Protocol) This plan will ultimately save New Yorkers $700 million in energy costs annually, improve • 1026 Mayors conditions for tenants, create 17,800 construction jobs, and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions by almost 5% – the largest single advance towards our 30% goal. • Greener, Greater Buildings Plan • Passed Into Law December 2009 • Six Laws Addressing New & Existing Buildings The New York City Council The City of New York Speaker Christine C. Quinn Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg A GREENER GREATER NEW YORK
    27. 27. Green Wash?
    28. 28. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process
    29. 29. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design
    30. 30. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition
    31. 31. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition • No Accountability • Energy Codes Not Enforced • Lack of Qualified Enforcers
    32. 32. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition • No Accountability • Energy Codes Not Enforced • Lack of Qualified Enforcers • Lack of “Good” Commissioning
    33. 33. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition • No Accountability • Energy Codes Not Enforced • Lack of Qualified Enforcers • Lack of “Good” Commissioning • Lack of Measurement & Verification
    34. 34. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition • No Accountability • Energy Codes Not Enforced • Lack of Qualified Enforcers • Lack of “Good” Commissioning • Lack of Measurement & Verification • Poor Operation & Maintenance • High-Performance Design is Worthless Without High-Performance Operation
    35. 35. Green Wash? • Inefficient & Expensive Design-Bid-Build Process • Hesitation Towards Passive Design • Lowest Cost to Get Recognition • No Accountability • Energy Codes Not Enforced • Lack of Qualified Enforcers • Lack of “Good” Commissioning • Lack of Measurement & Verification • Poor Operation & Maintenance • High-Performance Design is Worthless Without High-Performance Operation • Poor Results from Certified Buildings
    36. 36. Resources • Organizations • Resources ASHRAE Energy Codes www.ashrae.org www.energycodes.gov USGBC Engineering for Sustainability www.usgbc.org www.engineeringforsustainability.org U.S. Department of Energy High-Performance Buildings Magazine www.eere.energy.gov/buildings/ www.hpbmagazine.org • Programs Building EQ • Challenges / Climate Change www.buildingeq.com Architecture 2030 www.architecture2030.org ENERGY STAR www.energystar.gov Clinton Climate Change Initiative www.clintonfoundation.org Green Globes www.greenglobes.com Living Building Challenge ilbi.org International Green Construction Code www.iccsafe.org/cs/IGCC/ PlaNYC http://www.nyc.gov/html/planyc2030/ Chicago USA bmgsc.com
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