Gamestorming, not Brainstorming
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Gamestorming, not Brainstorming

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The 3 single best Gamestorming exercises — 6-8-5 for ideation, Poster Session for envisioning the future, and Start-Stop-Continue for decision making problems.

The 3 single best Gamestorming exercises — 6-8-5 for ideation, Poster Session for envisioning the future, and Start-Stop-Continue for decision making problems.

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  • Great talk Brynn! Visitors - check out the video about UX for Good and what we accomplished at http://www.ux4good.com.
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Gamestorming, not Brainstorming Gamestorming, not Brainstorming Presentation Transcript

  • Gamestorming,not BrainstormingBrynn Evans UX4Goodgplus.to/brynn May 4, 2012twitter.com/brynn #gamestorming
  • Hi, I’m Brynn Evans
  • gogamestorm.com@davegray@macgeo@sunnibrownThe Bookamzn.to/GamestormingBookMy “Cheat Sheet”bit.ly/GamestormingGuide
  • 6-8-5 sketching for IDEATION Poster Session 1 2 3 4 for ENVISIONING Before / After Process System5 6 7 8 Start, Stop, Continue for TAKING ACTION
  • 6-8-5 sketching1 2 3 45 6 7 8 6-8-5 sketching: gogamestorm.com/?p=688
  • 6-8-5 sketching Object of play:1 2 3 4 A generative game to come up with as many ideas as possible5 6 7 8 How to play: (1) Create a grid of 6–8 boxes (2) Set timer for 5 minutes (3) Sketch silently, goal is to create 6–8 sketches (4) After 5 minutes, share ideas with rest of the group
  • 6-8-5 sketching Goal:1 2 3 4 To find a jazz show to attend tonight 3 Considerations:5 6 7 8 • Will be a mobile app • Shows need to be marked as open / private / full / etc. • Display events to the user
  • Games for ideationBrainwriting (p. 82)includes everyone in evolving an idea (silent brainstorming,followed by collaborative building on ideas), all done in silence3-12-3 (p. 78)good for generating & developing lots of ideas in only 1 hourPost-ups (p.19, 69)to generate a lot of ideas; one idea per post-it.Party Invitationsimprove the onboarding process of a product or servicegogamestorm.com/?p=297(Page numbers reference the Gamestorming Book. See bit.ly/GamestormingGuide for more)
  • Poster Session Poster Session: Gamestorming p.114
  • Poster Session Object of play: To create a compelling image that summarize a challenge or topic for further discussion** How to play: (A) Each person creates 1 poster (B) Or...people start with small individual posters. Then share with a group; discuss important ideas, build** Poster has to be mostly visual upon others ideas. Create 1 poster per** Poster has to be self-explanatory group (20-MINS)
  • Photos by: flickr.com/photos/abovethefold
  • Before & AfterDescribe “why” someone shouldcare in terms of drawing the todayand tomorrow of an ideaProcessDescribe the “how” of an idea interms of a sequence of eventsSystemDescribe the “what” of an idea interms of its parts and theirrelationshipsPhotos by: flickr.com/photos/abovethefold
  • Games for envisioningDesign the box (p. 161)teams imagine the package for an idea in order to make decisions aboutimportant features & other aspects of their vision that are difficult to articulateCover Story (p. 87)to think expansively around an ideal future stateStoryboard (p. 71)players use a storyboard format to tell a story about an experience, how tosolve a problem, etc.Bodystorming (p. 59)using improv or “play acting” to feel out what might work in the real worldElevator pitch (p.166)uses madlibs to come up with a short, compelling description of the problemyou’re trying to solve(Page numbers reference the Gamestorming Book. See bit.ly/GamestormingGuide for more)
  • Start, Stop, ContinueSTART STOP continue...• daily standups • weekly status • prioritized meetings buglist• Friday “Flash” Report • tracking bugs • lessons learned & builds with at milestones email Start, Stop, Continue: Gamestorming p.249
  • Start, Stop, ContinueSTART STOP continue... Object of play: A closing game to come up with• daily standups • weekly status • prioritized meetings buglist next steps• Friday “Flash” Report • tracking bugs • lessons learned & builds with at milestones email How to play: (Start) What are the things we need to START doing? (Stop) What are we currently doing that we should STOP? (Continue) What works today and we should CONTINUE?
  • Games for decision makingChallenge Cards (p. 158)used to identify and think through potential challenges and pitfallsof a productPlus/Delta (p. 246)generate constructive feedback by focusing on what what positiveor repeatable about an activity, and what you would change aboutthe activityImpact & Effort Matrix (p. 241)possible actions are mapped out on a 2x2 grid based on: effortrequired to implement & potential impact of an idea$100 Test (p.232)uses the concept of cash to help prioritize a list(Page numbers reference the Gamestorming Book. See bit.ly/GamestormingGuide for more)