Generation Y and Generational Differences
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Generation Y and Generational Differences

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An overview of the differences between generations and the issues to be considered in managing Y Generation employees in particular

An overview of the differences between generations and the issues to be considered in managing Y Generation employees in particular

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  • This is food for thought for both the present and future Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Talent Strategy Workshop CIPD 17 November 2009 www.xancam.co.uk
  • Value hard work in themselves and others See careers as a vertical climb up the organisation Very much see themselves and other by their job and status Key concerns are financial independence and a secure retirement
  • Start to see a change from loyalty to organisation to loyalty to profession Lots of social, economical and family structure change to cope with Have had to convert to technology to survive
  • Prefer flexibility when it comes to where work/home starts and ends Technology naturals – its in their blood Adaptive learners Cope with large volumes of information but in ‘sound-bites’ Can get bored with routine
  • By the age of 38 is it expected that this generation will have worked in 10 different jobs Require access to credible mentors Demand motivational leadership within a reputable brand
  • Objective and Outputs; Facilitation;
  • Objective and Outputs; To consider if current succession planning thinking remains unchanged Facilitation; Are we likely to to sees a change that needs to be reflected in how we succession plan and develop future talent ?
  • Objective and Outputs; Bring to a conclusion on Facilitation; Review comments and ideas on the flip charts Identify further actions required

Generation Y and Generational Differences Generation Y and Generational Differences Presentation Transcript

  • Multigenerational Awareness – The Impact Now and in the Future Why generations matter. Roy Mark Total HRM 07736 631834
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  • the job you are likely to be doing in ten years time may not exist yet
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  • “ Each generation is a new people.” Alexis de Tocqueville 1805-1859 We have 3 generations working side by side and in the next 3 years will have 4; all responding differently to varying management and communication styles
  • ‘ Idealist’ ‘ Reactive’ ‘ Members’ ‘ Adaptive?’ ‘ Baby-Boomers’ 1943 – 63 Gen. X 1964 – 81 Gen. Y 1982 – 1996 ‘ Millennials’ 1997 – 2222?
  • Baby-Boomers (1943-1963)
  • Baby-Boomers (47-67 yr old)
    • Ethos: hard work; loyalty; rewards
    • Organisational and careerist (ladder climbers).
    • Define themselves by work achievements and social status.
    • Often worked for only one or two employers in their lifetime
    • Was largest generation in history - 35% of workforce
    • Defined by post-war optimism and values
    • Family-orientated
    • Idealistic and altruistic.
    • Socially liberal; politically conservative.
    • Chief goal is now comfortable retirement
  • Generation X (1964-1981)
  • Generation X (29-46 yr old)
    • Loyal (fixed) to a profession, but not necessarily to an employer.
    • Impacted by the decline of traditional industry
    • Blurring of traditional boundaries (class, economic mobility, etc).
    • Confident and independent, but concerned about work-life balance.
    • End of Cold-War certainties.
    • Lack of clarity – at home (M/F role), work and in the world.
    • Grew up during a time of strong political leadership.
    • Largest group now in the workforce.
    • ‘ Digital Converts ’.
  • Generation Y (1982-1996)
  • Gen Y– characteristics (14–28 yr old)
    • Connected …24/7
    • Blurred home/work boundaries (known as ‘whole-you’ rather than ‘work-you’+’home-you’)
    • Self-confident
    • Optimistic
    • Independent(?)
    • Bored by routine
    • Do not define themselves by job or organisation but by their people network and lifestyle
    • Entrepreneurial
    • Goal oriented
    • ‘ Digital Natives ’
  • Gen. Y – Expectations and Aspirations
    • Lots of Change, Challenge and Choice (work and play)
    • Not committed to one organisation or necessarily one career
    • Need a sense of purpose and meaning
    • Access to mentors and other company champions
    • Need to feel they can influence earnings
    • Open social networks that embrace open / honest communication
    • Solutions are often technology based
    • Flexibility
    • Motivational leadership
    • Career ‘brands’ which offer creative/visionary future
    • Casual employee/manager relationship (see managers as peers not superiors)
    • Coaching and mentoring (often)
    • Require frequent feedback
    • Opportunities for learning and developing
    • Interesting work
    • On-going development and support
    • Facilitated and experiential learning
    • Face-face learning rather than e-Learning (??)
  • USA Dept Employment estimate that today's students will have 10-14 jobs by the age of 38 Succession planning usually assumes a single employer!
  • The top 10 in-demand jobs in 2010……… … . did not exist in 2004!
  • Young Engineers View on Future Service
  • SOURCE: Bibb, S., Walker, S., James, J. (2008). Do our primary learning methods fit ?
  • Succession Planning Considerations
    • Generation ‘X’
    • Looking for a plan
    • Looking for a path
    • Looking for career direction
    • Succession planning focused on;
      • Identifying talent
      • Replicating proven competence sets
      • Operating within a relatively stable business environment
      • Identifying and developing talent from a retained and available talent pool
    • Generation ‘Y’
    • Give me a reason to stay (return)
    • Give me options and alternatives
    • Give me control of my career
    • Succession planning will need to;
      • Address a constantly and rapidly changing business and technical environment, with increased global competition
      • An adaptive competency framework (what worked in the past may not in the future?)
      • A demanding and more mobile workforce
  • Questions?
    • How do we identify career paths for jobs that may not exist in 10 years or without knowing what they may be replaced by ?
    • How do we ensure the Talent management process blends the needs of the ‘Y’ generations values with BAE’s needs, and ‘X’ Generation managers?
    • Do we need to do anything different - yet?
  • Falling Desire for Jobs with Greater Responsibility Source: Generation & Gender in the Workplace , An Issue Brief by Families and Work Institute 1992 2002
  • Lower Alignment with the Organization Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation , The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004
  • In 2000, A Fairly “Young” World . . . Source: U.S. Census Bureau Percent of Population Age 60+ in 2000 Under 5% 5% to 12.4% 12.5% to 20% Above 20%
  • . . . Rapidly Aging by 2025 Source: U.S. Census Bureau Percent of Population Age 60+ in 2025 Under 5% 5% to 12.4% 12.5% to 20% Above 20%
  • UK Changing Workforce Patterns
    • Age Profile
    • Fewer younger workers entering work
    • Declining mid-career workers
    • Rapid growth in over 55’s
    • Contributory Factors (affecting skills retention)
    • A more mobile Generation Y population
    • Generation X early retirement aspiration
    • Decline of single employer/location roles
    • End of final salary pensions and benefits
    • Continuous job content re-invention
  • Shifting the Old Work/Life Paradigm . . . Education Work Leisure Age Source: Demography is De$tiny , The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80
  • . . . To a “Cyclic” Life Paradigm Education Work Leisure Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Age 80
  • . . . Evolving to a “Blended Lifestyle” Education Work Leisure Source: Demography is De$tiny, The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2003 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Age 80
  • Cutting Back Has New Meaning: Cyclic Work The most popular pattern for working after “retirement” is not part-time, but moving back and forth between periods of working and not working. Source: The New Employee/Employer Equation , The Concours Group and Age Wave, 2004