• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
17 william whitenov1
 

17 william whitenov1

on

  • 261 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
261
Views on SlideShare
238
Embed Views
23

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 23

http://cbrc.net 21
http://www.cbrc.net 2

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    17 william whitenov1 17 william whitenov1 Presentation Transcript

    • The Great Thunderbirds have taken flight, Change is Coming, Songs will be sung!: Traditions, Culture and Article 30 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child Coast Salish Youth waiting to enter the Stadium for the Opening Ceremonies Commonwealth Games 1994. They arewearing headgear last worn 80 years ago. According to the late Steve Sampson Sr.Stziminus they were meant to protect and to surround during change and or transformation. They wait for traditional longhouse singers to begin singing a Welcome Song. His talk reflects on the importance of letting go of those things which do not belong. W. White Photograph Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • As we begin this work today we acknowledge the Sulalewh - Elders, Parents, Ancestors of our Coast Salish Hosts. This is important bearing in mind Chief Seattles’ 1855 speech in which he said “..there is no death, only a change of worlds…” as well as the red hat female ancestor who showed herself at the UBC longhouse. She sang a song which introduced herself to the people of that longhouse. To help with ‘knowing and believing’ she made herself visible.” We also honour brothers, sisters, relatives, significant others who passed before us. We do so because it is their songs, their ceremonies, their prayers, their teachings, which have covered the land Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtiss The North American Indian: the Photographic mages, 2001.http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/curthome.html Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • There is also a difference between the way ‘traditional work’ is begun and theway in which modern secular work happens. Western influence of ‘issues.”For example, it is likely that traditionally trained elders/specialists alwaysopened meetings with versions of a prayer/prayer song immediately followedby ‘good words/advice’. The Old People believed ‘words’ have power.In this way good relations with all living things are set in place and remind usof the importance of treating each other well. It is also deemed to protect. Swylana Park Harbour dedication, Nanaimo BC. c 1970s. Anderson Tommy, Departure Bay was told by his old people ,”These songs will echo long after we are gone.” He almost cried when he recalled their ‘words,’ Left to right, Katherine George, Eva Thomas, Margaret James, Emily Manson, Anderson Tommy.. With deep respect and thanks to the Sulalewhw for their teachings.) W.White Photo Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • There is more cultural diversity in BC than in any other part of North America. One of the commonalities is the relationship with the land. For example. In 1855 Chief Seattle referred to the importance of land. “Every part of this country is sacred to my people. Every hillside, every valley, every plain and grove has been hallowed by some fond memory or some sad experience of my tribe. Even the rocks which seem to be dumb as they swelter in the sun Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtiss along the silent seashore in solemn The North American Indian: the Photographic mages, 2001.http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/curthome.html grandeur thrill with memories of past events connected with the lives of my people.” Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • Even with issues associated with systemic discrimination - throughout this vast province Elders and Traditional leaders continue to hold Ceremonies, Songs, Teachings, Values associated with ‘Belonging’ ‘Being Strong’, ‘Helping Others’ and ‘Healing.’ Today, these concepts are protected through article 30 of the United Nations Convention on the Northwestern University Library, Edward S. CurtissThe North American Indian: the Photographic mages, 2001. http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/ curthome.html Rights of the Child (Canada, 1992) Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • Article 30 In those states in which ethnic, religious, or linguistic minorities or persons of indigenous origin exist, a child belonging to such a minority or who is indigenous shall not be denied the right, in community with other members of his or her own group, to enjoy his or her own culture, to profess and practice his or her own religion, to use his or her own language. also see article 3.1 "Best interests of the Child“ Northwestern University Library, Edward S. CurtissThe North American Indian: the Photographic mages, 2001. and article 4 "administrative actions to protect economic, social and cultural rights..." http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/ curthome.html Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • For the purposes of this gathering several fundamental concepts have been presented. Posed as questions these are: 1.  What teachings, values, traditions are Indigenous to the territory? 2.  What concepts about the land help strengthen families and communities and reinforce ‘being in balance’? 3.  Who are the specialists, historians/Elders who understand these very important historical concepts? 4.  How are your programs being innovative and collaborative for Northwestern University Library, Edward S. Curtiss The North American Indian: the Photographic mages, 2001. these classic concepts?http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/award98/ienhtml/curthome.html Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  Within each of our territories there is the value associated with good listening skills, the ability to listen is also a reflection of humility.•  In a culture with an emphasis on repetition this ensures the passage of teachings from one generation to the next.•  It is important therefore to ask what values are constantly reinforced by traditional leaders?•  These are the concepts studied before we began work interviewing Cowichan Elders ,W. White, A. Cienski, for the HIV/AIDS program called Kwam Kwum Sulitst/Strong Spirit. QPuthet Unwinus (Centre for Coming Together/Nanaimo, BC) Elders actively listening to a welcome song for school Children in the 1970s. William White Photo) Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • Left to right front row: Emily Manson, Hazel Good, Eva Thomas, Anderson Tommy, Katherine George/Elders Co- Ordinator, Barbara White. 1970’s Back row: Derreck George, Roy Aleck. (William White Photo)Elders by virtue of their training and background are the direct links tothe ancestors, particularly as they relate to strengthening valuesassociated with ‘helping others/collaboration’, ‘maintaining balanceand harmony’, ‘becoming stronger’ and if we are lucky they will alsobe familiar with the Indigenous language associated with theseconcepts. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  It is important to ask yourselves what happens when elders pray/give advice? Teachings and practices about 15 – 20 generations old.•  The Sioux called that place of power where contact is made with the Creator, where Ancestors connect as the ‘Sacred Cosmos.”•  For years I observed watching elders/Sulalewh getting ready to pray, to speak, to sing as they moved towards that sacred space. With consistency they became stronger.•  In doing so, for years and years prior with each day ‘let go of those things which did not belong (sadness, pain, anger etc.) in order not to spread those energies. More importantly not to harm themselves when moving onto the ‘place of power’. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  The Coast Salish region have been identified by the Anthropologist Barbara Lane and Art Historian Norman Feder as the most conservative on the coast. This in terms of keeping our traditions alive.•  That conservative nature has meant Elders do not normally speak about Sexual matters (ie use of condoms, abstinance, ejaculate etc.)•  It is for these reasons that our Project, Kwam Kwam Sulitst focuses on Values/Sinyews.•  The great fear and sadness associated with HIV, in stark contrast to the energies of prayers/songs/advice is the reason our approaches are based on Sinyews. (Snuneymuxw Tribal Dancers/boys performing dance associated with a Prayer Song. W. White Photo) Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  Early 1900’s Cowichan Potlatch at which young people undergoing change were provided with headgear which protected them during a change in their lives. This is the photo shown to the late S. Sampson Sr. In 1994. He immediately named them!•  Women who wove the Nobility Blankets called Swuqwulh, piled on the stand and worn by the young woman drew on the energies of both men and women. They took a month to weave, in which time she remained celibate.•  This has major implications for preparing the young who identify as the ‘sexual other.’ Identification of being ‘gay’ is a post contact phenomena. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  Our relatives who associate with being the sexual other (lgbt) today identified in a generic way as ‘two-spirited’ if working with traditional and or spiritual concepts have to reinforce spiritual training from both males and females in order to become stronger. It is also essential to continue working at ‘becoming in balance’ and ‘shedding those things which do not belong.”•  At recent gathering of Coast Salish Chiefs, Nov. 21-23, 2007 Philomena Alphonse/Cowichan said "this is where we come from, this is what we know" Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • The old people/Sulalewh before teaching anything new advised young people to “…let go of those things which do not belong…” and they looked to see if that happened. If so new teachings would come.•  Not long ago, after working with a Siowa/Seer and a number of elders in preparation for a trip to South Africa to meet traditional specialists I took a walk around Uvic (1993 -2006 Aboriginal Liaison Officer) to quietly pray, to talk and to beg the Creator and the Ancestors to answer 2 of at least 4 -6 questions (abstinence, Ancestors and travel, …death/plane). These were:•  With great humility I said, “Dear Ones, Great Creator, you know I have not come across anyone like me…I have not met any other Gay Spiritual people. Does this mean that I should not be doing these things? Does this mean that I am merely forcing myself onto that plane of power. If that is the case, please let me know and I will stop immediately and I will do so without any questions and or negotiation. “•  I also asked if I should stop working with xwulanitum/white people (historical oppression)? If so I would immediately stop with no questions and or negotiation.•  On that trip, and our first meeting with an Iglexia (State sanctioned healer) as soon as we sat in his family hut surrounded by two wives. I immediately knew he also slept with men. Later we met his student, also sanctioned by the state, in Capetown who was a white South African who spoke the language and dressed in the formal attire identifying himself as an Iglexia. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • “and the Ancestors, with help from the Creator to ensure the person is no longer troubledwith any number of issues. At least 6 -8 would line up, watching, listening to that persons’ heart, soul, mind…As he approached they would gather energies associated with his own pain suffering…wrap that in their hands and throw it – to see if he was still weak from those darknesses. Otherwise they would return the next day. To test again.1.  Especially associated with ceremony and preparation for seasonal events is the importance of learning how to ‘share.’2.  Lessons learned from last week, last month, the past, are taken into account before moving along to talk about the future Enjoyment of life, humour, teasing are fundamental to becoming strong. In the sixties we always saw the old people teasing each other and laughing.Within each area are also essential teachings associated with ‘forgiveness’ and the great physical/spiritual dangers associated with carrying these sentiments far beyond its’ time. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • •  Of learning from traditional leaders Mr. Greg Sam/Aboriginal Relations Co-Ordinator, Royal Roads University said: "..it also takes practice and listening over and over again to really understand and feel with the support of those who know. Nov. 29, 2007 (Personal Communication)•  Rarely if ever did they begin a prayer which made reference to issues (Racism, Indian Residential School, Poverty, HIV/AIDS etc.). They may have spoken about challenges as they moved along but they applied their own fundamental teachings associated with ‘Preparing Places of Safety.’ This is associated with the term ‘lalumathut / be careful. Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council
    • The Great Thunderbirds have taken flight Change is Coming, Songs will be sung!: Traditions, Culture and Article 30 of the Convention on the Rights of the ChildHeadpieces created for the first time in 80 years, by Steve Sampson Sr/Chemainus and Grace Horn/Saanich meant to protect and surround young people. Commonwealth Games Opening Ceremonies, 1994 William A. White Photograph Ministry of Children Coast Salish William A. White, and Families (Nanaimo/Cowichan) Elders Advisory Council