02 investigaytors nov1 (nx powerlite)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

02 investigaytors nov1 (nx powerlite)

on

  • 526 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
526
Slideshare-icon Views on SlideShare
208
Embed Views
318

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

3 Embeds 318

http://cbrc.net 252
http://www.cbrc.net 62
http://www.rachelthompson.ca 4

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • We had the highest response from men in Ontario followed by British Columbia.Perhaps because of amount of big cities.Also the survey has been running in BC for a while.
  • Majority of men were Caucasian.It looks like the survey is still tapping into a mainly Caucasian sample, considering the concentration of Asian men in BC and Ontario.
  • The majority of men, about 50%, in the study were between 40-59 with young gay men coming in second at about 20%.Interesting to have participants above 60+ considering the survey was an online survey.
  • Majority have college or some form of university education.
  • It’s interesting that even with an older sample, about 50% of men are making less than 50K. And really well educated.
  • For many of us, our first experience of not meeting these expectations of maleness was in our attractions to men. Some of us may meet the masculinity requirements of maleness, and some of us may strive to, but may never be “man enough.” Some of us may not even try to “be a man.” Many of us fit somewhere in the middle, perhaps in both of these categories from time to time as it often feels like we are NEVER “Man enough” no matter what we do....
  • The men who have worn nail polish to work are significantly more likely to have been gaybashed (experienced received verbal or physical violence) compared to guys who have not worn nail polish to work. These men are also significantly more likely to have experienced workplace discrimination than men who have not worn nail polish to work
  • A lot of time has been devoted to lamenting that younger gay guys didn't have the same connection to each other because they grew up in a different world. Gay marriage, postiveprotrayals in the media, HAART and post-AIDS. Speculation about the way that these things have affected 'kids these days' comes up from time to time, but I only ever saw anecdotal cases of the internet or grindr causing the breakdown in the chosen family unit.While Sex Now may not be perfectly suited for delving into inter-generational relations, it can be used to show some trends in young gay men's lives. Who are they? What do they want and how are they getting it?
  • Well let's see what they're looking for: (Table)43% were looking to date, this is higher than the 16% of guys over thirty28.6% looking to have sex with just a primary partner compared to 16.3% Bit of a role reversal when we're talking about primary partner and other guys.About the same on Sex buddies (43% and 46%) and Group sex (22.5% and 21.3%)When they're having sex, yougner guys masturbated and had anal sex more, and everyone was blowing each other, which is nice.
  • Well let's see what they're looking for: (Table)43% were looking to date, this is higher than the 16% of guys over thirty28.6% looking to have sex with just a primary partner compared to 16.3% Bit of a role reversal when we're talking about primary partner and other guys.About the same on Sex buddies (43% and 46%) and Group sex (22.5% and 21.3%)When they're having sex, yougner guys masturbated and had anal sex more, and everyone was blowing each other, which is nice.
  • What I thought was really striking was the differences in their support systems.Overall, young gay guys said that they could count on more people, it was especially pronounced in the Straight friends category.
  • What I thought was really striking was the differences in their support systems.Overall, young gay guys said that they could count on more people, it was especially pronounced in the Straight friends category.
  • One very important points that I found were: 34.3% were out before they were 18 compared to the 9.3% which I think speaks to the shift in societal attitudes. Gay guys are coming out younger these days, but what effect does this have on them?
  • Regardless of espoused sexual orientation, half of the guys in the sample were bullied about their sexuality, but those who came out were 2.38 OR 64.6 to 43.4%. 78.7 were harassed verbally, 21.8 physically (compared to 53.4 and 7.7). This corresponded to higher rates of suicidality and being prescribed medication for anxiety or depression.Across the board, younger gay guys who had come out, were able to find more support than those who hadn't. Which I think is somewhat heartening. Again, especially amongst straight friends and allies. Also in families.
  • Regardless of espoused sexual orientation, half of the guys in the sample were bullied about their sexuality, but those who came out were 2.38 OR 64.6 to 43.4%. 78.7 were harassed verbally, 21.8 physically (compared to 53.4 and 7.7). This corresponded to higher rates of suicidality and being prescribed medication for anxiety or depression.Across the board, younger gay guys who had come out, were able to find more support than those who hadn't. Which I think is somewhat heartening. Again, especially amongst straight friends and allies. Also in families.
  • So while guys are coming out more and more and yougner ages, I worry that we they may be doing so ahead of the capacity. Society may be changing, but I wonder if we're failing those that do come out, not by being there for them when they need support, but by not being proactive and not creating protection into our places of work and study.
  • Note: For questions 1 and 2 the difference was significant but the OR not high. Gay men scored significantly higher on question 3 with an odds ratio of 1.427 (1.288 - 1.581)
  • In thinking about what I wanted to look at in the SexNow survey, I really wanted to take an assets based approach, focusing on something positive, something we could be proud of, something meaningful both statistically and personally. After a bit of digging, I found myself nestled in the variable of social support. Social support can take many different forms such as…
  • The support of a close friend
  • The support of family whether biological or chosen
  • the support of a community. How ever it manifests, having social support is something that we can all understand and appreciate as a place of growth, as a place of friendship, and as a place of acceptance and belonging.
  • Its importance is recognized by the Public Health Agency of Canada and is listed as a key determinant of health, citing evidence that social contacts, social participation and emotional support relate to lower premature death rates and mortality. Given this information, the question that I settled on was how does social support relate to men in the SexNow survey?
  • In looking at social support I looked at the question “Who can you count on or talk to for support?”
  • When we looked at those personal sources of social support, we saw that gay men were the most likely to report having at least one group that they could count on for support at almost 90%.
  • When we separated social support into the different groups, what we can see is that gay men are the highest sources of social support among gay men and surprisingly among bisexual and straight identified men as well. What we can also see is that gay men tend to report having more support across the different social support groups.
  • Even when we look at it across different age groups, gay men remain a central source of support. Knowing this, I went on to look at the benefits of these social support networks.
  • I first looked at personal sources of support and how they were related to health behaviours. When we compared those gay men who did to those who did not have the various types of support as represented by the no and yes columns, we can see that having the support of a professional was related to an increased likelihood of testing for STIs in the past 12 months (50.5% versus 64.6%). And among the non-professional sources of support, having gay friends was the most highly related to an increased likelihood of testing as well.With regard to the “not significant” section, that means that there was no difference in rates of testing between those who did versus those who did not have that type of support, in this case the support of a partner. It should also be noted that although testing tends to be at around the area of 50%, it is useful to know that support can increase this number.
  • Very similar findings were found in relation to support and HIV testing as well. With professionals having the highest relation to testing for HIV followed by gay friends.
  • I also looked at how support related to those who accessed medical services in the last 12 months. Here, we saw that having a professional that you could count on or talk to was very highly related to testing. Gay friends again came in the highest when it came to non-professional sources of support.The positive influences of support extend beyond promoting health seeking behaviours, which brings me to...
  • Support and how it related to more subjective experiences. As we can we here, the highest probably of happy guys have the support of a partner. Also interesting to note though is that the greatest difference in percentages is found between having and not having gay friends for support with those reporting not having gay friends being substantially less likely to be happy than compared to the other support groups.
  • When asked if they were satisfied with how their body looked in the past 12 months, having a partner was the most highly related to body satisfaction, followed surprisingly by gay friends.
  • Which brings me to creme de la creme of support. How it relates it feeling that gay and bi men are accepted within one’s respective communities. Here all types of support had a role to play. With the greatest difference occurring in men who had and did not have the support of gay friends.
  • In fact, the more support men had, the more likely they were to report feeling accepted. Those who had all 5 types of support had the highest percentage of men reporting feeling accepted.
  • *Read the messages*
  • They are the people we go to when we need a helping hand
  • When we want to feel
  • Like a million bucks
  • And where we can be
  • Ourselves.

02 investigaytors nov1 (nx powerlite) 02 investigaytors nov1 (nx powerlite) Presentation Transcript

  • SEX NOW SURVEY: UNDER THE LENS OF THE INVESTIGAYTORSBC Gay Men‟s Health Summit – November1st
  • The Investigaytors‟ journeyDarren Ho
  • cbrc.net/investigaytors
  • Who answered the survey?Trevor Hodges
  • Province Alberta 1065 (13%) British Columbia 1805 (21%) Manitoba 342 (4%) New Brunswick 105 (1%) Newfoundland and 85 (1%) Labrador Nova Scotia 223 (3%) Northwest Territories 11 (0.1%) Nunavut 4 (0.05%) Ontario 3367 (40%) Prince Edward Island 33 (0.4%) Quebec 1048 (12%) Saskatchewan 289 (3%) Yukon 8 (0.1%) Outside of Canada 109 (1%) Total 8494 (100%)
  • Language 9% Englis h 91%
  • EthnicityAfrican 23 (0.3%)Asian 216 (3%)Caribbean 55 (1%)Caucasian 7401 (87%)First Nation 119 (1%)Inuit 2 (0.02%)Métis 50 (1%)Latino/Hispanic 115 (1%)Pacific Islander 54 (1%)South Asian 12 (0.1%)Mixed 74 (1%)Other 373 (4%)
  • Age (Mean = 43 years old)30% 25%25% 23% 21%20% 17%15% 11%10%5% 2% 2% 0.10%0% >19 19-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70-79 80-89
  • Education40%35% 34%30% 25%25% 19%20%15% 14%10% 4% 4% 5% 0%
  • Income25% 22%20%15% 12% 12% 10%10% 9% 9% 9% 7% 6%5% 4%0% Under 10K - 20K - 30K - 50K - 60K- 70K - 80K - 90K - 100K + 10K 19K 29K 49K 59K 69K 79K 89K 99K
  • Sexual Orientation 2% 1% Gay 32% Bi Straight 65% Other
  • Partnership Status 50% 44% 45% 40% 35% 30% 25% 21% 20% 15% 15% 10% 6% 6% 5% 5% 1% 2% 0%
  • HIV Status at Last Test80%70% 69%60%50%40%30% 23%20%10% 8%0% HIV positive HIV negative Never tested
  • Gender Non-Conformity forMenJaedyn Starr
  • Gender Non-Conformity for Men Definition: When a man‟s clothes, presentation, expressions, intonation, e tc., do not meet society‟s expectations of how a man should be. Gender Non-Conforming Man: Feminine, Femme, Queen, Sissy, Nelly, Swishy, etc. Gender Conforming Man:
  • Fingernail Analysis Men were asked if they have ever worn nail polish at work as a way to be out about their sexuality. Hypothesis: Men who demonstrate visible gender non- conformity experience more violence and workplace discrimination due to gender based oppression.
  • Fingernails and PhysicalViolence80% 71%70%60%50% 46%40% 34% 30%30%20% 16% 12%10%0% Experienced Verbal Experienced Physical Experienced Workplace Violence Violence Discrimination OR: 2.8 OR: 3.2 OR: 2.8 p < .001 p < .001 p < .001 Painted fingerails (N = 237) Did not paint fingernails (N = 8257)
  • Nail Polish as a proxy for Gender Non-Conformity Let‟s consider fingernail polish as a proxy variable for Gender Non-Conformity Gender non-conforming men may be more likely to have received violence Where do we go from here?
  • Nail Polish Practical Implications Research that encompasses parameters for gender non-conformity to better understand the role of gender expression in men‟s health and experience  e.g. Options for gender expression such as masculine, jock, queen, “straight-acting,” etc. Public Outreach Campaigns that support men exploring our insecurities around gender  e.g. How many of us would wear a dress in public? To work? Why? Services for gender non-conforming men
  • Ready or Not:An analysis of generationaltrends and the effects of comingout earlierKeith Reynolds
  • What do they want?What are they looking 30 or over Under 30 OR 95% CI for?Dating 16% 43% 4.0 3.5 - 4.4Sex w/ Partner 16% 29% 2.1 1.8 - 2.3Sex w/ Partner andothers 31% 20% 0.5 0.5 - 0.6Sex Buddies 46% 43% 0.9 0.8 – 1.0Group Sex 23% 21% Not Significant
  • What do they want?What are they into? 30 or over Under 30 OR 95% CIMasturbation 57% 73% 2.0 1.8 – 2.3Oral 89% 90% Not SignificantAnal 52% 61% 1.4 1.3 – 1.6Leather, spanking, ws 7% 6% 0.8 0.6 – 1.0Rough, fisting, dildos 7% 9% 1.3 1.1 – 1.5
  • Are the kids alright? 30 and over Under 30 OR 95% CIBullied before 18(about sexuality) 37% 51% 2.2 2.0 – 2.5Verbal Violence 43% 62% 2.1 1.9 – 2.4Physical Violence 13% 13% Not SignificantMedication forDepression/Anxiety 24% 17% 0.7 0.6 - 0.7Suicidality 48% 59% 1.5 1.4 - 1.7
  • Are the kids alright?Who can they count 30 and over Under 30 OR 95% CI on for support?Family 32% 48% 2.0 1.8 – 2.1Gay friends 63% 73% 1.6 1.4 - 1.8Straight friends 40% 69% 3.4 3.0 – 3.8Professionals 30% 26% 0.8 0.7 – 9.5No one 27% 17% 0.5 0.5 - 0.6
  • The New „Normal‟ 34% of guys under 30 had come out by the time they were 18, compared to 9% of guys 30 years and older.
  • Effects of Coming Out Earlier Not Out <18 Out <18 OR 95% CISex before 18 37% 72% 4.4 3.6 – 5.5Bullied before 18(about sexuality) 43% 51% 2.4 1.9 - 2.9Verbal Violence 53% 79% 3.2 2.6 - 4.0Physical Violence 8% 22% 3.4 2.5 - 4.5Suicidality 54% 69% 1.9 1.6 - 2.3Medication forDepression/Anxiety 22% 30% 1.6 1.3 - 2.0
  • Effects of Coming Out EarlierWho can they count Not Out <18 Out <18 OR 95% CI on for support?Family 40% 66% 2.9 2.4 - 3.6Gay friends 68% 82% 2.1 1.7 - 2.7Straight friends 61% 85% 3.6 2.8 - 4.6Professionals 22% 34% 1.8 1.4 - 2.2No one 22% 6% 0.2 0.1 - 0.3
  • Discussion Guys over 30 tend to have less robust support systems which may be vulnerable Coming out earlier not a significant indicator of UAI or substance abuse Bullying is pervasive regardless of espoused sexual orientation, but heightened if they are out Diverse support systems are available, however does not necessarily protect from harassment
  • Relationship Status and HealthJordan Sang
  • Interests / Why relationships? Lets be honest, being single can sometimes SUCK I wanted to understand the relationship of being in no relationship and the health outcomes in comparison to men who were in relationships Hypothesis: Single men will have more mental and physical health inequities
  • The Relationship DataRelationship Status Gay BisexualSingle 2872 (52%) 750 (27%)Partnered with a man 2124 (39%) 109 (4%)Partnered with a woman 110 (2%) 1585 (58%)Other 384 (7%) 296 (11%)
  • Mental Health and Relationships % OR (95% CI)Suicidal thought (last 12months)Partnered with a woman 16% REFPartnered with a man 24% 1.7 (1.4 – 2.0)Single 31% 2.5 (2.1 – 2.9)Loneliness (More than 25%)Partnered with a woman 24% REFPartnered with a man 24% Not significantSingle 46% 2.7 (2.4 – 3.1)Sad (More than 25%)Partnered with a woman 19% REFPartnered with a man 24% 1.3 (1.1 – 1.5)Single 32% 2.0 (1.7 – 2.3)
  • Mental Health andRelationships % OR (95% CI)Depression (last 12months)Partnered with a woman 10% REFPartnered with a man 15% 1.7 (1.4-2.0)Single 17% 1.9 (1.6-2.2)Anxiety (last 12 months)Partnered with a woman 13% REFPartnered with a man 21% 1.8 (1.5-2.2)Single 16% 1.4 (1.1-1.6)Suicide attempt (last 12months)Partnered with a woman 1.1% REFPartnered with a man 1.7% 1.5 (0.9-2.7)Single 2.3% 2.1 (1.3-3.5)
  • Drugs and Relationships % OR (95% CI)Party DrugsPartnered with a woman 7% REFPartnered with a man 17% 2.8 (2.2 – 3.4)Single 18% 3.1 (2.5 – 3.8)SmokingPartnered with a woman 32% REFPartnered with a man 33% Not significantSingle 40% 1.5 (1.3 – 1.6)Frequent Binge DrinkingPartnered with a woman 12% REFPartnered with a man 13% Not SignificantSingle 15% 1.3 (1.1 – 1.5)
  • Sexual Health and Relationships % OR (95% CI)Any UAI with unknown oropposite status partnerPartnered with a woman 19% REFPartnered with a man 31% 1.9 (1.6-2.1)Single 34% 2.1 (1.9-2.4)Tested for STI (last 12months)Partnered with a woman 31% REFPartnered with a man 53% 2.6 (2.3-2.9)Single 53% 2.6 (2.3-2.9)Tested for HIV (last 12months)Partnered with a woman 33% REFPartnered with a man 53% 2.3 (2.0-2.6)
  • Support Systems andRelationships % OR (95% CI)Support from familyPartnered with a woman 5% REFPartnered with a man 59% 29.6 (23.4-37.5)Single 37% 12.1 (9.6-15.2)Support from friendsPartnered with a woman 35% REFPartnered with a man 87% 12.4 (10.6-14.6)Single 76% 5.9 ( 5.2-6.7)No SupportPartnered with a woman 56% REFPartnered with a man 6% 0.47 (0.03-0.05)Single 22% 0.22 (0.19-0.25)
  • Conclusions Single men are more likely be sad, depressed and suicidal  Drug use increases for being single Lack of support systems for single men Testing for HIV and STI‟s are roughly the same, however, single men are more likely to engage in risky sexual behaviors It‟s not all bad news for single men. Some cases single men have similar health outcomes Highlights the importance of the social determinants on gay men
  • The Power of Love
  • How does a gay man‟s view of hisbody affect his mental health?Joshun Dulai
  • Body Perception Questions1. How have you been in the last 12 months? [I‟m satisfied with how my body looks] No (I’m not satisfied with Yes (I’m satisfied with how my body looks) how my body looks) Gay Men 43% 57% Bisexual & Straight Men 50% 50%2. How have you been in the last 12 months? [I should be losinglosing No (I should not be losing Yes (I should be weight] weight) weight) Gay Men 39% 61% Bisexual & Straight Men 34% 66%3. How have you been in the last 12 months? [I wish I was more muscular] No (I wish I was not more Yes (I wish I was more muscular) muscular) Gay Men 22% 78% Bisexual & Straight Men 29% 71%
  • Body Perception andDepression Gay Men Bisexual & Odds Ratio Straight MenHave been 12% 7% 1.9unsatisfied withtheir bodies forthe last 12 monthsFelt like they 19% 12% 1.9should be losingweight the last 12monthsWished they were 18% 12% 1.9more muscular inthe last 12 months
  • Body Perception and Anxiety Gay Men Bisexual & Odds Ratio Straight MenHave been 18% 10% 1.7unsatisfied withtheir bodies forthe last 12 monthsFelt like they 19% 13% 1.8should be losingweight the last 12monthsWished they were 20% 13% 1.7more muscular inthe last 12 months
  • Body Perception and Suicidal Thought Gay Men Bisexual & Odds Ratio Straight MenHave been 19% 12% 1.7unsatisfied withtheir bodies for thelast 12 monthsFelt like they 32% 20% 1.8should be losingweight the last 12monthsWished they were 32% 22% 1.7more muscular inthe last 12 months
  • Attempts at Explaining thisDifference Internet Usage and Body Satisfaction  Gay News  Pornography  Squirt  Manhunt Discrimination and Body Satisfaction  Acceptance  Exclusion  SingledOut  Cyber Bullying/Harassment
  • Body Satisfaction and AccessingMental Health ServicesOf those who are unsatisfied with their bodies,how many have visited a(n)… Gay Men Bisexual & Straight Odds Ratio Men Psychiatrist within the 24% 16% 1.7 last 12 months Psychologist within 30% 18% 2.0 the last 12 months Therapist within the 26% 18% 1.6 last 12 months Counsellor within the 17% 7% 2.5 last 12 months Other health care 32% 18% 2.3 provider within the last 12 months
  • Summary While gay men who are unhappy with their bodies score higher than bisexual and straight men on depression, anxiety, and suicidality, the vast majority of men are mentally healthy We may not know what causes this difference between gay men and bisexual and straight men on mental health measures, but on the bright side gay men who do feel more negatively about their bodies are discussing these issues with health care providers
  • Sex, Drugs, and RiskDaniel McGraw
  • Is the gay community one ofdrug abusing sluts? And if so,how might this impact healthoutcomes?
  • Just who qualifies? Fucked 6 or more partners 3014 (50%) Fucked 12 or more partners 1891 (31%) Fucked 30 or more partners 784 (13%) Any UAI with unknown or 1972 (33%) opposite sero status partner
  • How we compare MSM GAY OR (p-Value) Fucked 6 or more partners 38% 50% 1.6 (.000) Fucked 12 or more Partners 19% 32% 2.0 (.000) Fucked 30 or more partners 6% 13% 2.2 (.000)
  • UAI by number of sexualpartners Less than More than OR (P 12 12 values) MSM 20% 40% 2.8 (.000) Gay 23% 50% 3.4 (.000) All 22% 49% 3.3 (.000)
  • Reassuring HIV testing habits Tested for HIV last 12 OR (p value) months By number of Partners Less than 12 50% Ref 12 or more 66% 1.9 (.000) BY UAI No UAI 51% Ref At least one episode 60% 1.4 (.000)
  • Not so reassuring… TESTED FOR HIV OR (.000)Less than 12 PartnersNo UAI 48% RefAt least one UAI episode 55% 1.3 (.000)12 or more sexual partnersNo UAI 67% RefAt least one UAI episode 65% 0.9 (.321)
  • Anybody wanna party? (According to Sex Now, about one in five of us would, yes) Party Drug Use OR (P value) Total 15% MSM 8% Ref GAY 18% 2.6 (.000)
  • Party Drugs OR (.000)Under 30MSM 21% RefGay 21% 0.9 (.000)30 +MSM 7% RefGay 17% 2.8 (.000)
  • Associations with party druguse No Drugs Party Drugs OR (p value) UAI 29% 52% 3.3 (.000) Suicide 2% 4% 2.6 (.000) attempts Fucked 12 + 30% 46% 1.9 (.000) partners
  • Drugs, UAI, and high volume ofsex partners…. UAI OR (.000)Less than 12 PartnersNo drugs 23% RefParty Drugs 37% 2.0 (.000)12 or more sexual partnersNo drugs 47% RefParty Drugs 70% 2.7 (.000)
  • ConclusionsAs none of my findings are conclusive, I have noconclusions; analysis is ongoingThrough examining men like myself and many around me Ihoped to gain a better understanding of associated risksfor those like myself and like gay guys like myself that IloveThese numbers, while interesting, are useless withoutqualitative or institutional follow-up.
  • To my first posed question…Certainly, we enjoy our bodies and we enjoy oursubstances, and these are joys not withoutassociated risks.
  • Gay Men and Social SupportDavid Le
  • Riding theCaltrain forthe first timeTravellingthroughspace Graduation
  • Decorating a cakeHaving fondue
  • Mpowerment YVR Qmunity Health Initiative for Men
  • Social Support in the SexNowSurveyWho can you count on or talk to for support?Gay friends FamilyStraight friends PartnerProfessional(i.e., doctor, advocate, counsellor)
  • Did men have social support?100 % 88%90 %80 %70 % Report few 59% to no one60 % 52% 48% for social50 % support 41%40 % Had social30 % support20 % 12%10 % 0% Gay Bi Straight
  • Who can you count on or talk to for support?100 %90 %80 %70 %60 % Family Gay Friends50 % Straight Friends40 % Professionals30 % Partner20 %10 % 0% Gay Bi Straight
  • Support Across the Lifespan100 %90 %80 %70 %60 % Partner Family50 % Gay40 % Straight30 % Professional20 %10 % 0% <25 25-3030-3535-4040-4545-5050-5555-60 60+
  • STI Testing in the Past 12Months Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 1.6 Gay friends 47% 58% (1.4 –1.8) 1.2 Straight friends 53% 57% (1.1 – 1.3) Partner 56% 55% Not Significant 1.3 Family 53% 59% (1.1 – 1.4) 1.8 Professional 51% 65% (1.6 – 2.0)
  • HIV Testing in the Last 12months Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 1.6 Gay friends 46% 58% (1.4 – 1.8) 1.2 Straight friends 53% 57% (1.08 – 1.3) Partner 56% 55% Not Significant 1.2 Family 53% 58% (1.1 – 1.4) 1.6 Professional 51% 63% (1.5 – 1.8)
  • Last Medical Appointment Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 1.5 Gay friends 78% 84% (1.3 – 1.8) Straight friends 83% 83% Not Significant 1.2 Partner 82% 84% (1.01 – 1.4) 1.3 Family 81% 85% (1.1-1.5) 2.8 Professional 78% 91% (2.3 – 3.3)
  • Happiness Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 2.0 Gay friends 66% 80% (1.7 – 2.3) 1.6 Straight friends 71% 80% (1.4 – 1.8) 1.9 Partner 72% 83% (1.6 – 2.1) 1.7 Family 72% 81% (1.5 – 1.9) Professional 76% 77% Not Significant
  • Body Satisfaction Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 1.4 Gay friends 37% 45% (1.2 – 1.6) Straight friends 42% 44% Not Significant 1.4 Partner 40% 48% (1.3 – 1.6) 1.2 Family 41% 46% (1.1 – 1.3) Professional 42% 44% Not Significant
  • Feeling Accepted Type of Support No Yes Odds Ratio 2.3 Gay friends 75% 87% (2.0 – 2.7) 2.2 Straight friends 78% 89% (1.9 – 2.6) 1.8 Partner 82% 89% (1.6 – 2.1) 2.3 Family 80% 90% (1.9 – 2.7) 2.1 Professional 81% 90% (1.8 – 2.5)
  • Feeling Accepted100 %90 %80 %70 %60 %50 %40 %30 %20 %10 % 0% No Support 1 Support 2 Support 3 Support 4 Support 5 Support
  • Take away messagesHaving a professional we can count on, greatly facilitates our likelihood of testing and accessing health care servicesWhen we have partners, we are more likely to feel happy and good about our bodiesAcross the board, gay friends remain a consistent source of benefits both in health behaviours and in feelings of happiness and acceptance What does this look like in our day to day lives?
  • They are the people we go to when we need a helping hand...
  • When to we FEELwant ...
  • Like a million bucks...
  • And where we can BE ...
  • Ourselves.
  • Questions?