Sonnet

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Sonnet

  1. 1. The SonnetThe Sonnet
  2. 2. A sonnet isA sonnet is  a lyric poema lyric poem  consisting of fourteen linesconsisting of fourteen lines  written in iambic pentameterwritten in iambic pentameter  with a definite rime schemewith a definite rime scheme  and a definite thought structureand a definite thought structure
  3. 3. A lyric poemA lyric poem Deals withDeals with emotions,emotions, feelingsfeelings
  4. 4. Iambic pentameter consists ofIambic pentameter consists of  five measures, units, or meters, offive measures, units, or meters, of  iambsiambs
  5. 5. AnAn iambiamb is a metrical footis a metrical foot consisting ofconsisting of an unaccented syllablean unaccented syllable UU followed by an accentedfollowed by an accented syllablesyllable //.. U /U / a gaina gain U / U /U / U / im mor tal izeim mor tal ize
  6. 6. Iambic pentameterIambic pentameter U / U / U / U / U /U / U / U / U / U /  One day I wrote her name u pon the strand,One day I wrote her name u pon the strand, U / U / U / U / U /U / U / U / U / U /  But came the waves and wash ed it a way:But came the waves and wash ed it a way: U / U / U / U / U /U / U / U / U / U /  A gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand,A gain I wrote it with a sec ond hand, U / U / U / U / U /U / U / U / U / U /  But came the tide, and made my pains his preyBut came the tide, and made my pains his prey  Edmund Spenser, Amoretti, Sonnet 75Edmund Spenser, Amoretti, Sonnet 75 1 2 3 4 5
  7. 7. Rime schemeRime scheme  Petrarchan (Italian) rime scheme:Petrarchan (Italian) rime scheme: abba, abba, cd, cd, cdabba, abba, cd, cd, cd abba, abba, cde, cdeabba, abba, cde, cde  Shakespearean (English, orShakespearean (English, or Elizabethan) rime scheme:Elizabethan) rime scheme: abab, cdcd, efef, ggabab, cdcd, efef, gg
  8. 8. Sonnet 18Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's dShall I compare thee to a summer's dayay?? Thou art more lovely and more temperThou art more lovely and more temperateate:: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of MRough winds do shake the darling buds of Mayay,, And summer's lease hath all too short a dAnd summer's lease hath all too short a dateate:: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shSometime too hot the eye of heaven shinesines,, And often is his gold complexion dAnd often is his gold complexion dimmedimmed,, And every fair from fair sometime declAnd every fair from fair sometime declinesines,, By chance, or nature's changing course untrBy chance, or nature's changing course untrimmedimmed:: But thy eternal summer shall not fBut thy eternal summer shall not fadeade,, Nor lose possession of that fair thouNor lose possession of that fair thou ow'stow'st,, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shNor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shadeade,, When in eternal lines to time thou grWhen in eternal lines to time thou grow'stow'st,, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can sSo long as men can breathe, or eyes can seeee,, So long lives this, and this gives life to thSo long lives this, and this gives life to theeee.. A B A B C d C D E F E F G G
  9. 9. Thought structureThought structure  Octave/ sestetOctave/ sestet The octave, eight lines, presents aThe octave, eight lines, presents a situation or idea.situation or idea. The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds,The sestet (sextet), six lines, responds, to the situation or idea in the octave.to the situation or idea in the octave.  Quatrain, quatrain, quatrain, coupletQuatrain, quatrain, quatrain, couplet Each quatrain, four lines, describes andEach quatrain, four lines, describes and idea or situation which leads to aidea or situation which leads to a conclusion or response in the couplet, twoconclusion or response in the couplet, two lines.lines.
  10. 10. Sonnet 18Sonnet 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate:Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough windsRough winds do shake the darling buds of May,do shake the darling buds of May, AndAnd summer'ssummer's lease hath all too short a datelease hath all too short a date:: SometimeSometime too hottoo hot the eye of heaven shines,the eye of heaven shines, And often isAnd often is his gold complexion dimmedhis gold complexion dimmed,, AndAnd every fair from fair sometime declinesevery fair from fair sometime declines,, By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed:By chance, or nature's changing course untrimmed: ButBut thythy eternaleternal summersummer shall not fade,shall not fade, Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow'stNor lose possession of that fair thou ow'st,, Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade,Nor shall death brag thou wander'st in his shade, When inWhen in eternaleternal lines to time thoulines to time thou grow'stgrow'st,, So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see,So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and thisSo long lives this, and this gives life to theegives life to thee.. The octave describes the ways in which the summer’s day is inferior to the beloved. The sestet describes the ways in which the beloved is superior to the summer’s day.
  11. 11. Sonnet 29Sonnet 29 WhenWhen inin disgracedisgrace with fortunewith fortune and men's eyesand men's eyes II all aloneall alone beweepbeweep mymy outcastoutcast state,state, AndAnd troubletrouble deafdeaf heaven with myheaven with my bootlessbootless criescries,, And look upon myself, andAnd look upon myself, and cursecurse my fate,my fate, Wishing meWishing me like to one more rich in hope,like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed,Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope,Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope, With what I most enjoyWith what I most enjoy contented leastcontented least;; YetYet in these thoughts my self almost despising,in these thoughts my self almost despising, HaplyHaply I think on theeI think on thee, and then my state,, and then my state, Like to theLike to the larklark at break of dayat break of day arisingarising From sullen earth,From sullen earth, singssings hymnshymns at heaven's gate;at heaven's gate; ForFor thythy sweet lovesweet love remembered suchremembered such wealthwealth bringsbrings ThatThat then I scorn to change my state with kingsthen I scorn to change my state with kings.. The diction of the octave implies the speaker’s self-pity and depression. The sestet’s diction, in conrast, is joyful.
  12. 12. Sonnet 73Sonnet 73 That time of year thou mayst in me behold When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. In me thou see'st the twilight of such day As after sunset fadeth in the west; Which by and by black night doth take away, Death's second self, that seals up all in rest. In me thou see'st the glowing of such fire, That on the ashes of his youth doth lie, As the death-bed, whereon it must expire, Consum'd with that which it was nourish'd by. This thou perceiv'st, which makes thy love more strong, To love that well, which thou must leave ere long. 1st Quatrain Year - Fall 2nd Quatrain Day - Twilight 3rd Quatrain Fire - Coals “This” is ll.1-12
  13. 13. Sonnet 73Sonnet 73 The speaker isThe speaker is Part of life livedPart of life lived The whole of lifeThe whole of life in thein the fallfall of his lifeof his life the spring and summerthe spring and summer the yearthe year in thein the twilighttwilight of the dayof the day the morning and noonthe morning and noon the daythe day In the glowing coalsIn the glowing coals The ashes of youthThe ashes of youth hourhour Q1Q1 Q2Q2 Q3Q3 Year Day Hour Time is rapidly shortening. That time is running out is what the beloved perceives.
  14. 14. The UnsonnetThe Unsonnet Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show,Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain,That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain, Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know,Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know, Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain,—Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain,— I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe ;I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe ; Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain,Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain, Oft turning others' leaves to see if thence would flowOft turning others' leaves to see if thence would flow Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sun-burned brain.Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sun-burned brain. But words came halting forth, wanting invention's stay ;But words came halting forth, wanting invention's stay ; Invention, nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows,Invention, nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows, And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way.And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way. Thus, great with child to speak, and helpless in my throes,Thus, great with child to speak, and helpless in my throes, Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite,Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, Fool, said my muse to me, look in thy heart and write.Fool, said my muse to me, look in thy heart and write. Philip Sidney,Philip Sidney, Astrophel and StellaAstrophel and Stella, Sonnet 1, Sonnet 1
  15. 15. Loving in truth, and fainLoving in truth, and fain in verse my love toin verse my love to showshow,, That she, dear she,That she, dear she, mightmight take sometake some pleasurepleasure of my painof my pain,, Pleasure mightPleasure might cause her readcause her read,, readingreading mightmight make her knowmake her know,, Knowledge mightKnowledge might pity winpity win, and, and pitypity gracegrace obtainobtain,—,—
  16. 16. II sought fit wordssought fit words to paint the blackestto paint the blackest face of woe ;face of woe ; Studying inventions fineStudying inventions fine, her wits to, her wits to entertain,entertain, Oft turning others' leavesOft turning others' leaves to see ifto see if thence would flowthence would flow Some fresh and fruitful showers uponSome fresh and fruitful showers upon my sun-burned brain.my sun-burned brain.
  17. 17. ButBut words came haltingwords came halting forth,forth, wantingwanting invention'sinvention's stay ;stay ; Invention, nature's child, fled step-dameInvention, nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows,Study's blows, AndAnd others' feetothers' feet still seemed butstill seemed but strangersstrangers in my wayin my way.. Thus,Thus, great with child to speakgreat with child to speak, and helpless, and helpless in my throes,in my throes, Biting myBiting my truant pentruant pen, beating myself for, beating myself for spite,spite, Fool, said my muse to me, look in thyFool, said my muse to me, look in thy heart and write.heart and write.
  18. 18. / U / / U // U / / U / Plea sure might cause her read,Plea sure might cause her read, / U / / U // U / / U / read ing might make her knowread ing might make her know Trochee: / U Spondee: / /Trochee: / U Spondee: / /
  19. 19. The UnsonnetThe Unsonnet Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show,Loving in truth, and fain in verse my love to show, That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain,That she, dear she, might take some pleasure of my pain, Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know,Pleasure might cause her read, reading might make her know, Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain,—Knowledge might pity win, and pity grace obtain,— I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe ;I sought fit words to paint the blackest face of woe ; Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain,Studying inventions fine, her wits to entertain, Oft turning others' leaves to see if thence would flowOft turning others' leaves to see if thence would flow Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sun-burned brain.Some fresh and fruitful showers upon my sun-burned brain. But words came halting forth, wanting invention's stay ;But words came halting forth, wanting invention's stay ; Invention, nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows,Invention, nature's child, fled step-dame Study's blows, And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way.And others' feet still seemed but strangers in my way. Thus, great with child to speak, and helpless in my throes,Thus, great with child to speak, and helpless in my throes, Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite,Biting my truant pen, beating myself for spite, Fool, said my muse to me, look in thy heart and write.Fool, said my muse to me, look in thy heart and write. Philip Sidney,Philip Sidney, Astrophel and StellaAstrophel and Stella, Sonnet 1, Sonnet 1

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