Embedding Quotation
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Embedding Quotation

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Embedding Quotation Embedding Quotation Presentation Transcript

  • How to Embed Quotations Mister Connor’s Class
  • Each piece of quoted material in a paragraph must have the context and background for that quote.
  • Embedding quotations correctly helps quoted material flow naturally into your paragraph.
  • Example: While traveling on a bus, the author is “H eart-filled, head-filled with glee”.
  • When written properly, the reader should not be able to hear where the quotation marks are when the sentence is read aloud.
  • A properly embedded quotation creates an invisible link from the background information to the quoted material.
  • Poor example: This is shown by “And he was no bit bigger”.
  • The last example does not make sense when read aloud.
  • Better example: The writer demonstrates this in chapter two by saying, “And he was no bit bigger”.
  • You may need to miss out words in your quote so that the sentence is grammatically correct and is coherent.
  • When missing words out, replace them with “…”
  • Example: George says ranch hands “are the loneliest guys in the world… they ain’t got nothing to look ahead to.”
  • How to create a good transition into a quotation:
  • 1) give background and context for the quote - what is happening, who is speaking
  • 2) only use the most important part of the quote. Don’t go on and on and on and on…
  • 3) read your sentence aloud - can you “hear” the quotation marks? You shouldn’t be able to.