myYearbook/Ketchum Teen Study

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  • 1. © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL
  • 2. What
is
myYearbook?
 •  #1
Site
for
Teens
–
comScore
Teens
 •  More
Visits
than
the
next
5
largest
sites
combined
 •  Fastest
growing
social
network
in
the
US
 •  Visits
up
79%
and
Minutes
up
78%
Over
Last
6
Months
 •  Highly
Engaged
Audience
 •  Members
spend
154
minutes
per
month
 •  High‐quality,
Original
Content
 •  PlaSorm
for
original
social
games
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 2
  • 3. Top Teen Sites Stickiest Sites Rank Site Name Total Visits (000) Rank Site Name Average Visits 1 myYearbook.com 55,302 21 COX.com 12.8 22 MySpace.com 12.7 2 Gaiaonline.com 16,581 3 Imvu.com 13,145 23 myYearbook.com 12.4 4 Meez.com 9,663 24 Salesforce.com 12.3 5 Zwinky.com 8,164 25 Optimum.net 12.2 Most Trafficked Sites Rank Site Name Total Pages Viewed (MM) 21 Plentyoffish.com 993 22 Apple.com 966 23 myYearbook.com 964 24 Twitter.com 945 25 Roblox.com 909 Source: comScore, US, Apr 2010 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 3
  • 4. Fast
Growing,
Engaged
Audience
 Monthly Pageviews (mm) Monthly Minutes (mm) 1,000 800 950 750 900 700 850 650 800 600 750 550 700 Twitter 500 650 450 Twitter myYearbook 600 400 myYearbook 550 350 500 300 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar-10 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10 Feb-10 Mar-10 84% growth 95% growth for myYearbook for myYearbook total pageviews from Nov minutes from Nov 2009 to 2009 to Mar 2010 Mar 2010 Source: comScore, myYearbook.com and Twitter.com © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 4
  • 5. myYearbook
Ketchum

 Teen
Influencer
Study

 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL
  • 6. Ketchum Ketchum Youth Research Marketing Audience insights Sports & Entertainment Marketing Passion Precision Trend Spotting Social Media Brand Planning Content Agency Integration Memes & Media Relations © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 6
  • 7. Social
Media
Teen
Influencer
Survey
 •  10,000
Teens
Surveyed
 •  500,000+
individual
answers
to
55
quesVons
 •  Margin
of
error
for
the
findings
is
+/‐
2.3
percent
with
a
confidence
interval
 of
95
percent
 •  DefiniVon
of
a
Teen
Influencer:
 •  Aged
13
–
19
 •  Top
15%
Most
AcVve
and
Engaged
myYearbook
Members
 The
Internet
is
not
just
a
way
for
teens
to
pass
Gme,
rather
it
shapes
their
 offline
socializaGon,
media
consumpGon,
and
purchasing
habits
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 7
  • 8. Why
These
Teens
are
So
Important
…
 Teens are active, online and share with friends… 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% Influencers All Teens 30% 20% 10% 0% Went to movie lastPlan to buy mobile Tune in TV based Watch movies Tell friends what weekend phone on online ads based on online products they use ads © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 8
  • 9. Profile
of
a
Teen
Influencer •  97%
spend
over
2
hours
per
day
on
social
media
sites
 •  95%
update
their
status
at
least
once
a
day
 •  91%
have
more
than
500
friends
on
social
media
sites
 •  88%
send
more
than
3,000
texts
per
month
 •  81%
share
informaVon
with
friends
oaen
or
very
oaen
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL
  • 10. Teens
with
Online
Friends
are
More
Social
Offline
 •  Social
media
popularity
translated
offline
 •  Of
all
teens
surveyed,
influencers
were
38%
more
likely
to
have
acended
 a
party
last
weekend
than
teens
as
a
whole
 •  They
were
much
more
likely
to
engage
in
other
social
acVviVes
 •  Teens
who
are
more
social
online
are
the
most
social
offline
 Influencers: More Likely than Other Teens to... 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% Go to concert Go to sports Go to party Go to mall Go to movie Go to friends Movie at home event house © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 10
  • 11. Age
MaNers
–
Younger
Teens
Don’t
Like
Their
Parents
on
 Their
Social
Network
 •  56%
of
teen
Influencers
aged
13‐14
“Hate
 It”,
are
“Nervous”
or
“Annoyed”
of
parents
 friending
them
on
social
media
sites
 •  However,
only
27%
of
Teen
Influencers
aged
 18‐19
classify
in
the
same
categories
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 11
  • 12. Purchasing
Power:

Influencers
Buy
More
of
Everything
 •  Influencers
lead
the
way
for
product
purchases
and
media
consumpVon
 Influencers are 21% more likely to Influencers are 36% more likely to 21% have purchased Music, Movies or 36% have purchased Electronics (iPod, Books in the last 6 months TV) in the last 6 months (82% of Influencers and 68% of Teens overall) (67% of Influencers and 49% of Teens Overall) 28% Influencers are 28% more likely to own a smartphone. (35% of Influencers and 27% of Teens overall) © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 12
  • 13. Influencers
Don’t
Just
Buy
–
They
Share
 •  Influencers
not
only
purchase
at
a
 higher
rate
than
teens
in
general,
but
 they
are
much
more
likely
to
share
 their
purchase
decisions
and
what
 products
they
are
using
with
friends
 •  Influencers
were
70%
more
likely
to
 share
purchasing
decisions
vs.
teens
 as
a
whole
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 13
  • 14. How
Teens
Consume
Media
 •  The
majority
of
teens
mulVtask
when
watching
television
 •  But
the
rate
at
which
Influencers
mulV‐task
is
greater
than
teens
as
a
whole
 Watch TV and Send Texts Watch TV and Be Online 90% 85% 85% 80% 75% 80% 70% 75% 65% 70% 60% 65% 55% Influencers Teens Influencers Teens © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 14
  • 15. Teen
Influencers
are
Much
More
Likely
to
Be
Online

 than
Watching
Television
 •  The
Internet
is
more
popular
than
television
for
teens,
and
even
more
so
for
 Influencers
 % Spending More than 2 Hours Each Day 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% Online 20% Online TV TV 10% 0% Influencers Teens © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 15
  • 16. Branded
Online
Content
Becoming
Increasingly
 InfluenGal
vs.
Television
Commercials
 •  Branded
content
and
video
trailers
are
more
likely
to
make
teens
tune
in
to
a
 TV
show
than
television
commercials
 •  53%
of
Teen
Influencers
cite
branded
content
and
trailers
as
a
reason
to
tune
 in
vs.
50%
ciVng
television
commercials
 •  The
gap
widens
when
teens
are
considering
going
to
the
movies
 •  64%
of
Influencers
cite
branded
content
and
trailers
as
a
key
item
convincing
 them
to
acend
a
movie
vs.
57%
ciVng
television
commercials

 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 16
  • 17. AdverGsing
Preferences
–
Influencers
are
also
Influenced
 Television:
 •  74%
of
Teen
Influencers
decide
to
tune
in
and
watch
a
TV
show
on
a
 parVcular
day
based
on
their
friends
feedback
 •  Only
64%
of
teens
in
general
will
do
the
same
 Movies:
 •  The
same
applies
to
movies.

73%
of
Influencers
will
go
see
a
movie
based
on
 their
friends’
reviews
vs.
66%
of
teens
in
general
 •  Influencers
are
11%
more
likely
to
go
 •  And
being
influencers
–
they
will
recommend
it
to
other
friends
aaer
 watching
it
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 17
  • 18. Teens
Like
Fan
Pages
 •  60%
of
teen
Influencers
and
43%
 of
teens
overall
are
influenced
by
 a
movie’s
Fan
Page
 •  67%
of
Influencers
have
also
 commented
on
a
Fan
Page
to
 extend
their
influence.

 DEAN IMAGE FAN PAGE Influencers
were
82%
more
likely
 to
have
commented
a
Fan
Page
 •  Fan
pages
as
a
branding
plaSorm
 give
movies
or
groups
an
outlet
 to
reach
their
fans
and
drive
 engagement
and
appear
here
to
 stay
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 18
  • 19. Teens
Embrace
Branded
Content
but
Expect
Something
 in
Return
 •  Teens
are
recepVve
to
branded
content
but
expect
something
in
return
for
 their
acenVon
 •  IncenVve
works
on
teens
 How to Best Promote Your Brand to Teens 70% 65% 60% 55% 50% 45% 40% 35% 30% Ads to Earn Currency Ads that Unlock Features General Ads © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 19
  • 20. LOL
and
OMG!
–
What
Resonates
with
Teens
 •  Content
that
is
parVcularly
humorous
or
shocking
resonates
most
with
teens
 •  They
are
most
likely
to
share
content
that
is
humorous,
shocking
or
includes
 a
celebrity
 •  The
majority
of
teen
influencers
prefer
interacVons
from
brands
to
be
clear
 and
get
to
the
point
 •  But
they
also
appreciate
when
a
brand
can
be
edgy,
funny
or
shocking
–
as
 long
as
they
do
it
well!
 “Brands
hoping
to
keep
up

should
find
unique
ways
to
parGcipate
in
the
 things
teenagers
already
care
about
instead
of
compeGng
with
what’s
 already
capturing
their
aNenGon.”

Adrianna
Giuliani,
VP,
Ketchum
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 20
  • 21. Key
Survey
Findings
 •  Teens
with
online
friends
party
more
offline
 •  Younger
Teens
don’t
like
their
parents
on
their
social
network
 •  Teen
influencers
are
also
more
likely
be
influenced
by
their
friends
 •  Social
media
Influencers
consume
more
media
of
all
types:
music,
TV,
 books,
newspapers,
magazines,
etc.
 •  Majority
of
Teens
mulV‐task
while
watching
television
 •  Teens
are
online
more
than
they
watch
television
 •  Online
ads
surpass
television
commercials
in
influencing
teens
 •  Teen
influencers
embrace
fan
pages
 •  Teens
expect
something
in
return
for
their
acenVon
on
Brands
 •  The
most
sharable
content
for
teens
online
is
LOL
or
OMG
 © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL 21
  • 22. © 2010 CONFIDENTIAL