Body And Soul Presentation Adapted

  • 823 views
Uploaded on

 

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
823
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
9
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul Program Presentation This presentation contains slides that describe the Body & Soul program. The goal of this presentation is to provide an orientation to Body & Soul and how it works including: The goals, objectives, and benefits of Body & Soul Information about the health of Americans and their risk for diet-related disease The importance of eating fruits and vegetables The four pillars of Body & Soul How to customize Body & Soul for your church The history of the program Community Partners can use this presentation to orient pastors, program coordinators, and planning teams. It can also be used internally for training. Body & Soul Coordinators can use this presentation to present the program and its benefits to church members. You can customize the presentation to fit your audience’s needs by deleting or adding slides. Add information about your organization including resources available and contact information. Each slide contains talking points in the notes section. Print the presentation using the “Notes Pages” option to view the talking points while you are presenting.
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul is a wellness program that was developed for African American churches. Body & Soul empowers church members to eat more fruits and vegetables to improve their health and lower their risk for diet related illnesses. Body & Soul works by combining: Pastoral leadership and support Educational activities that teach members skills, help people learn about ways to prevent chronic diseases, and allow church members to try new fruits and vegetables A church environment that supports healthy eating Peer counseling that provides individual support for church members
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul churches are able to embrace and celebrate good health through healthy eating. Members of Body & Soul churches: Eat more fruits and vegetables each day Learn how health and spirituality are connected Embrace other healthy habits such as eating less fat and being more physically active
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10 As you can see, the top five causes of death in the U.S for African-Americans are largely related to lifestyle choices. The first four are associated with diet, physical activity and weight. This list is similar for whites, except that diabetes is the number 6 cause of death for whites.
  • 05/12/10 African-Americans suffer disproportionately from many of the major health conditions in the U.S. They often get these health conditions earlier, tend to get the worst forms of these diseases, AND usually die earlier from them. African-Americans are more likely than ANY other group to report being in fair or poor health. African-Americans also have a lower life expectancy than Caucasians
  • 05/12/10 Heart Disease and stroke (cardiovascular disease) are the first and third leading causes of death in the U.S. African-Americans are more likely to die from heart disease and stroke than whites. This is most likely due to the high prevalence among African Americans of several major risk factors for cardiovascular disease particularly high blood pressure.
  • 05/12/10 Diabetes is one of the most serious health challenges facing the African-American community. In fact: 11.4% of African-Americans aged 20 years or older have diabetes. One in four African Americans between the ages of 65 and 74 have diabetes. One in four African-American women over 55 years of age has diabetes. The prevalence of diabetes is significantly higher among African-Americans than whites. African Americans are more likely to die from diabetes than whites. Risk factors for diabetes include poor nutrition, lack of physical activity, and obesity
  • 05/12/10 Heart disease African Americans are twice as likely to suffer diabetes related blindness African Americans are 1.5 to 2.5 times more likely to suffer from lower limb amputations. African Americans with diabetes are 2.6 to 5.6 times more likely to suffer from kidney disease
  • 05/12/10 As we have just discussed, the two leading causes of death in the U.S. are heart disease and cancer. When we look at the underlying causes of cancer, some research estimates that one-third may be attributed to poor diet and physical inactivity.
  • 05/12/10 When we look at physical activity, most Americans do not meet the guidelines for at least 30 minutes of moderate activity on most days of the week. Fewer African American adults meet these guidelines. African-Americans trail Caucasians and Hispanics in the number of people 18 years or older who participate in regular moderate physical activity.
  • 05/12/10 African-Americans also show disparities in the area of healthy eating. Most adults are not meeting the recommendations for fruit and vegetable consumption. Among African-American adults, less than 20% are eating the recommended five or more servings of fruits and vegetables per day.
  • 05/12/10 Given the diet and activity patterns of Americans, it is not surprising that we are seeing an epidemic of overweight and obesity across the country among all ages, races, and income groups. Rates of overweight and obesity among African American women are particularly high.
  • 05/12/10 Lifestyle refers to the choices we make. These choices can impact our health, either reducing our risk for chronic disease, or increasing our risk.
  • 05/12/10 The most important risk factors for chronic disease are tobacco use and diet and activity. For African Americans who do not smoke, their most important modifiable risk factor for chronic disease is diet.
  • 05/12/10 NCI recommends eating a variety of fruits and vegetables from the different color groups to help reduce the risk of many chronic illnesses.
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul is based on NCI funded research conducted in North Carolina (Black Churches United for Better Health) and at Emory University (Eat for Life Trial). The American Cancer Society and NCI worked with the researchers from UNC and Emory to translate this research into a program that could be delivered on a wide scale
  • 05/12/10 The Body & Soul evaluation was conducted with 15 churches located throughout the country. The churches were grouped into pairs and randomly assigned to intervention and delayed intervention groups. Churches ran the programs themselves with technical assistance from Society field staff and volunteers.
  • 05/12/10 After six months, the intervention churches showed a statistically significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption over the delayed intervention churches. They also showed statistically significant decrease in fat consumption and increases in internal motivation and self-efficacy. The significance of this research was to demonstrate that churches could implement the program on their own using community based resources and still achieve significant changes in behavior.
  • 05/12/10 We know that the program has been successful when - Participants eat more fruits and vegetables. But, there are other important measures of success too, including: changes in church policies and practices related to foods served in the church increased awareness, knowledge, and self-efficacy of healthy eating among church members established collaborative relationships between the community partners and the church. These relationships are important, since there often are other programs and services that might be beneficial for church members.
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul works because it addresses a combination of factors that influence eating habits. Some of the specific reasons why this program works include the following: Since church members design and manage the program there is church “buy in”. It is the church community that provides a supportive environment for individual change – not an external group. A mix of multiple activities help ensure repeated exposure--that is, reinforcement of the program messages, and address both the church culture and the individual's eating habits Peer Counseling--self-identified participants who want to change their eating habits receive encouragement from peers who are specially trained to help them find ways to fit dietary changes into their lives Attractive materials– the materials are appealing and have value to the participants The activities are fun--its all about the pleasures of eating It is about good food and good health! It is a positive program about something we all like to do--eat good food!
  • 05/12/10 Note: Be sure to point out to participants where they can find information about each pillar in the Body & Soul Program Guide. The four pillars of Body & Soul make up the major components of the program in the church. The pillars are: committed and involved pastoral support church activities the promote healthy eating creating a church environment that promotes healthy eating peer counselors to motivate church members As we will discover, all four pillars must be in place in order for Body & Soul to be effective.
  • 05/12/10 Ask participants to turn to page 5 of the program guide. As the organizational and spiritual leader of the church, the pastor’s support is vital to any and all activities that occur
  • 05/12/10 For the Body & Soul program, the pastor’s support: sends a clear message to the congregation about the importance of the program AND of healthy lifestyle choices shows that the program is keeping with the mission of the church helps church members see the link between physical health and spiritual well being
  • 05/12/10 Pastors also can: serve as role models for the congregation of healthy behaviors deliver messages about healthy eating and living in their preaching and teaching request changes in how food is served at church events encourage the congregation and the planning team in their body & Soul efforts
  • 05/12/10 Ask participants to turn to page 6 of the program guide. Activities that encourage church members to eat more fruits and vegetables are the heart of Body & Soul.
  • 05/12/10 These activities help in three ways. They: teach church members about health give them the opportunity to try new types of fruits and vegetables help them learn skills they can use to change their eating habits The more activities offered by the church, the more church members are exposed to fruits and vegetables, and they are therefore more likely to be motivated to eat more.
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul activities can include: workshops, cooking demonstrations, taste tests, and many others. Activities developed by churches are listed in the program guide on page 7. Activities can also be incorporated into existing church programs. Sunday school, homecomings, and other church events and activities can include Body & Soul components. Activities can target a specific population in the church, such as men or seniors, or they can be open to the entire congregation. Ask participants: What might be some other activities churches could do to encourage and promote healthy eating? (Suggested responses might be: field trips to the grocery store, trainings on how to make favorite foods, especially “soul food” healthier, creating a church cookbook of favorite recipes, partnering with other churches on nutrition matters, putting messages in the church bulletin.)
  • 05/12/10 It is recommended that all churches start with a kick off event. Body & Soul research showed that members who attended kick-off were more likely to attend to attend other church activities and change their behavior. Information about the kick-off is provided on page 6 of the program guide. The Body & Soul activities: begin with a kick-off event to set the tone for the program include ongoing activities to inform and inspire the congregation celebrate the congregation’s attempts to improve their health
  • 05/12/10 Ask participants to turn to page 8 of the program guide. Serving healthier foods at church demonstrates: the church “practices what it preaches” the church’s commitment to congregational health that healthy eating is a part of church life Other examples of how churches created healthier environment are included on page 8 of the program guide. Ask participants: What are ways that churches can bring more fruits and vegetables into the church or change the church environment to promote health eating?
  • 05/12/10 The third pillar of Body & Soul is a church environment that promotes healthy eating Body & Soul is most effective when the church sets a good example A successful program gives church members the opportunity to eat plenty of fruits and vegetables at church functions and events When this is combined with leadership from the pastor and knowledge from the activities it helps people change their behavior Serving more fruits and vegetables at the church shows that the church practices what it preaches and is committed to the health of the congregation This pillar makes healthy eating a part of church life
  • 05/12/10 The peer counseling component of Body & Soul provides a way for church members to talk with other church members about the personal benefits of healthful eating and the barriers they face. Mostly, the counselors act as coaches encouraging members to find ways to make healthy choices.
  • 05/12/10 The Peer Counselor Training DVD available from NCI provides the information the church needs to plan and implement the Peer Counseling component. The DVD contains: A Peer Counselor Coordinator Handbook with information about recruiting, training and managing peer counselors A Peer Counselor Workbook with information about working with church members An instructional video that trains Peer Counselors in the communication techniques used in Body & Soul Show the introduction to the Peer Counselor Training DVD or present slides 35 to 39.
  • 05/12/10 Interested church members sign up to talk with a peer counselor to learn how healthy eating relates to their life goals and values. The talks are tailored to each person and the member works with the counselor to develop her or his own action plan for healthy eating.
  • 05/12/10 The peer counselors are church members identified by the planning team who are trained in an adaptation of a method called “motivational interviewing,” which has been shown to be an effective method for changing health behavior.
  • 05/12/10 Peer Counselors use a style of communication that is open, supportive and not judgmental. They do not give advice. Instead, they help people overcome their own barriers and find their own motivation to change
  • 05/12/10 The peer counseling component: offers one-on-one assistance to those members who need it helps them fit healthy eating into their daily lives adds a “personal touch” to the program
  • 05/12/10 Body & Soul has been designed to be implemented by churches – not by outside organizations. Church “ownership” ensures the program is tailored to the individual needs of a congregation and promotes sustainability. This unique aspect of Body & Soul means that the church is responsible for deciding on the content of the program and what types of resources and activities they will bring to the congregation. The primary responsibility for customization lies with the church coordinator and church planning team.
  • 05/12/10 The Church Coordinator is the person who oversees all aspects of planning and implementation of Body & Soul at the church. They meet with the Community Partner to learn about the program components and how they are implemented. They orient the Planning Team to the program They ensure that all four pillars are planned and implemented
  • 05/12/10 serves as the major link between the church and the Community Partner provides information, materials, resources, and experience Ensuring the timely and successful completion of all tasks Ensuring the Peer Counselor coordinator has the necessary support to recruit and train Peer Counselors Note: Be sure to detail what support the community partner will provide to the coordinator
  • 05/12/10 The Team plans, coordinates, carries out, and promotes the activities. The Team also tracks the program’s success and links the program directly to the congregation and the pastor. The Team then is responsible for customizing the program to meet the needs of the congregation.
  • 05/12/10 Members of the health ministry or First Aide group Members from various ministries and auxiliaries, such as men’s, women’s and youth ministries Members of the kitchen committee Doctors, nurses, dietitians, and other members with expertise in health and nutrition issues Church leaders including Sunday school teachers, Deacons, or Elders Note: Be sure to detail what support the community partner will provide to the planning team.
  • 05/12/10 The planning team customizes Body & Soul by: Identifying the needs and interests of the congregation Identifying resources and opportunities that already exist within the church to promote health Working activities into the church’s existing programs and structures. Identifying additional resources that could be brought into the church as part of Body & Soul
  • 05/12/10 The Planning Team should look for resources that are already in the church to run Body & Soul, such as people with an interest in health issues or health professionals who can serve as volunteers. The Team should also find ways to obtain other resources from the community, such as educational materials, fruits and vegetables, and incentives. These items often can be obtained at little or no cost from local organizations that may be eager to partner with faith groups. Be sure to detail how the Community Partner will assist the team in locating these resources.
  • 05/12/10 Prepare a timeline and task list of who is going to do what Make a list of resources needed for each activity Contact community organizations to request their assistance with activities, materials, speakers, food or incentives. Examples include 4-H Clubs, Cooperative Extension Service, local grocery stores and businesses, food distributors, etc. Get the word out about programs early and often, and use church-based avenues for promoting events, such as the church bulletin, bulletin boards, newsletter, offering envelops, fans, etc. Offer door prizes and other incentives for program participation
  • 05/12/10 Attend Body & Soul events and functions at the church Keep a good tracking system to ensure that programs occur as planned Keep on-going records of Body & Soul events and activities, including a scrapbook of flyers, pictures, news clippings, sermon notes, bulletin inserts, etc. Schedule regular meetings for feedback on how well the program is working and needed adjustments or improvements.
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10
  • 05/12/10

Transcript

  • 1. Body & Soul A Celebration of Healthy Eating & Living
  • 2. What is Body & Soul?
    • A health program originally designed for African-American churches.
    • A program that empowers church members to eat a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables every day for better health.
    • A program that works by combining:
      • Church Staff leadership
      • Educational activities
      • A church environment that supports healthy eating
      • Peer counseling
  • 3. The Blessings Of Body & Soul
    • Body & Soul churches embrace and celebrate good health through healthy eating.
    • Body & Soul congregations:
      • Eat more fruits and vegetables.
      • Learn how health and spirituality are connected.
      • Embrace other healthy habits.
  • 4. Why Body & Soul?
    • “ Do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have from God, and that you are not your own?”
      • 1 Corinthians 6:19
      • However…
  • 5. Why Body & Soul?
    • We eat more fat – especially hydrogenated fat (trans fat), saturated fat and butterfat – more refined sugars and starches, more artificial sweeteners, more salt and more packaged and processed foods than anyone else.
    • We consume less vitamin-rich produce, less dietary fiber and less omega-3, a fatty acid vital to life, than anyone else.
    • http://www.oakwood.org/upload/docs/Stewardship_01_Diet_Exercise.pdf
  • 6. Why Body & Soul?
    • We have the world’s highest incidence of hypertension, heart and blood vessel disease, diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, and seventeen kinds of cancer.
    • In fact…
  • 7. Why Body & Soul?
    • Top 6 Causes of Death among Americans:
    • Heart disease
    • Cancer
    • Stroke
    • Chronic lower respiratory diseases
    • Accidents (unintentional injuries)
    • Diabetes
    http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/lcod.htm
  • 8. Why Body & Soul?
    • 60% of us are overweight or obese.
        • http://www.oakwood.org/upload/docs/Stewardship_01_Diet_Exercise.pdf
  • 9. Heart Disease and Stroke
    • Risk factors include:
      • High Blood Pressure
      • High cholesterol
      • Diabetes
      • Smoking
      • Physical inactivity
      • Obesity
  • 10. Type 2 Diabetes
    • Type 2 diabetes used to be called adult-onset diabetes.
    • There has been a significant increase in Type 2 diabetes in children and teens in recent years. This increase is so startling that it is being called an epidemic.
  • 11. Complications from Diabetes
      • Heart disease
      • Diabetes-related blindness
      • Lower limb amputations
      • Kidney disease
  • 12. Underlying Causes of Cancer Estimated percentage of total cancer deaths attributable to established causes of cancer: Tobacco Adult diet/obesity Sedentary lifestyle Occupational factors Family history of cancer Viruses/other biologic agents Perinatal factors/growth Reproductive factors Alcohol Socioeconomic status Environmental pollution Ionizing/ultraviolet radiation Prescription drugs Medical procedures Salt/other food additives or contaminants 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35
  • 13. Percent of People Meeting Physical Activity Guidelines* *At least 30 minutes of moderate activity on most days of the week .
  • 14. Average Frequency of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Per Day by Race
      • *Five or more servings of fruits and vegetables recommended per day .
  • 15. Percent of Adults who are Overweight by Race/Ethnicity
  • 16. QUESTION: What Can We Do?
    • NOTHING, or….
    • We can make choices to:
    • positively impact our own health, and
    • positively impact the health of others.
  • 17. About 22% of Americans smoke. However, 100% of Americans eat! QUESTION: Why Focus on Dietary Behaviors?
  • 18. The Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables
    • The different colors of fruits and vegetables-green, red, yellow/orange, blue/purple, and white - contain a range of nutrients that work with vitamins and minerals to help protect our health.
  • 19. The Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables
    • Vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and hundreds of phytonutrients—natural substances found in plants—may play a role in helping to reduce the risk for disease.
  • 20. History of Body & Soul
    • Body & Soul is based on National Cancer Institute (NCI) funded research conducted in North Carolina (Black Churches United for Better Health) and at Emory University (Eat for Life Trial).
    • The American Cancer Society and NCI worked with the researchers from UNC and Emory to translate this research into a program that could be delivered on a wide scale.
  • 21. Body & Soul Evaluation
    • Body & Soul was evaluated in 15 churches from across the country
    • Churches ran the programs themselves with technical assistance from American Cancer Society field staff and volunteers.
  • 22. Body & Soul Evaluation
    • Intervention churches showed:
      • a significant increase in fruit and vegetable consumption
      • a significant decrease in fat consumption
      • significant increases in internal motivation and self-efficacy
    • Research demonstrated that churches could implement the program on their own and yet achieve a significant change in behavior.
  • 23. Measures of Success
    • Increased consumption of fruit and vegetables among participants.
    • Changes in church policies and practices related to foods served (link to SHIP).
    • Increased awareness, knowledge, and self-efficacy of healthy eating among participants.
    • Collaborative relationships.
  • 24. Why Body & Soul Works
    • Church “buy in” leads to a supportive environment
    • Multiple components reinforce messages
    • Motivational interviewing
    • Attractive materials
    • Fun activities
    • It is about good food and good health!
  • 25. The Four Pillars Of Body & Soul
    • A committed and involved church leader.
    • Church activities that promote healthy eating.
    • A church environment that promotes healthy eating.
    • Peer counseling that motivates church members to eat a healthy diet.
    All four pillars must be in place to build an effective Body & Soul program.
  • 26. Pillar 1: A Committed and Involved Church Leader
    • For example, the pastor. The pastor is the spiritual and organizational leader of the church.
    • Or perhaps a parish nurse?
  • 27. Pillar 1: A Committed and Involved Church Leader
    • Church Leader Support:
    • Shows that the program is keeping with the mission of the church.
    • Helps church members see the link between physical health and spiritual well being.
  • 28. Pillar 1: A Committed and Involved Church Leader
    • Church Leaders also can:
    • Serve as role models of healthy behaviors.
    • Teach and preach about healthy eating and living.
    • Request changes in the food that is served at church events.
    • Encourage the congregation and the planning team in their Body & Soul efforts.
  • 29. Pillar 2: Church Activities That Promote Healthy Eating
    • Activities that encourage church members to eat more fruits and vegetables are the heart of
    • Body & Soul.
  • 30. Pillar 2: Church Activities That Promote Healthy Eating
    • Church-wide activities:
    • Opportunities to learn about health and healthy foods.
    • Opportunities to try new types of fruits and vegetables.
    • Opportunities to learn skills they can use to change their eating habits.
  • 31. Pillar 2: Church Activities That Promote Healthy Eating
    • Body & Soul
    • Activities Can Include:
    • Workshops
    • Cooking demonstrations
    • Taste tests
    • “ Farmer’s Market”
    • Others???
  • 32. Pillar 2: Church Activities That Promote Healthy Eating
    • Body & Soul:
    • Begins with a kick-off event to set the tone for the program.
    • Includes ongoing activities to inform and inspire the congregation.
    • Celebrates the congregation’s attempts to improve its health.
  • 33. Pillar 3: A Church Environment That Promotes Healthy Eating
    • With Body & Soul,
    • the church:
    • Sets a good example.
    • Models healthy eating practices.
    • Serves fruits and vegetables at every food event.
  • 34. Pillar 3: A Church Environment That Promotes Healthy Eating
    • Serving healthier foods at church demonstrates:
    • The church “practices what it preaches.”
    • The church’s commitment to congregational health.
    • That healthy eating is a part of church life.
  • 35. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
    • With Peer Counseling :
    • Members talk with other members about healthy eating
    • The counselors act as coaches
  • 36. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
      • Peer Counselor Training DVD Contains:
      • A Coordinator Handbook
      • A Peer Counselor Workbook
      • An Instructional Video
  • 37. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
    • In peer counseling, church members:
    • Sign up to talk to a trained volunteer counselor from the church.
    • Learn about how healthy eating relates to life goals and personal values.
    • Develop a personal action plan.
  • 38. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
    • Peer Counselors:
    • Are church volunteers.
    • Have experience or a background in a helping profession.
    • Are trained in a technique called motivational interviewing.
  • 39. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
    • Peer Counselors:
    • Use open, supportive, and non-judgmental communication.
    • Do not give advice
    • Help members. overcome their own barriers and find their own motivation to change.
  • 40. Pillar 4: Peer Counseling That Motivates Members To Eat A Healthy Diet
    • The peer counseling component:
    • Offers one-on-one assistance to members.
    • Helps them fit healthy eating into their lives.
    • Adds a “personal touch” to the program.
  • 41. Customizing Body & Soul
    • Implemented by churches – not outside organizations.
      • Ensures the program is tailored to the needs of the congregation.
    • Church is responsible for content of program.
      • Church Coordinator
      • Church Planning Team
  • 42. Role of the Church Coordinator
    • Oversees all aspects of program planning and implementation.
    • Learns about the program components.
    • Orients the Planning Team.
    • Ensures all four pillars are implemented.
  • 43. Role of the Church Coordinator
    • Serves as major link between all individuals and groups.
    • Provides information, materials, resources, and experience.
    • Ensure timely and successful completion of tasks.
    • Ensure the Peer Counselor Coordinator has support to recruit and train counselors.
  • 44. Role of the Planning Team
    • Works closely with the Coordinator to:
    • Plan, coordinate, implement, and promote activities.
    • Track success.
    • Link the program to the congregation and pastor.
    • Customize the program for the congregation.
  • 45. Role of the Planning Team
    • Planning Team can include:
    • Members of the health ministry, kitchen committee, and various ministries and auxiliaries.
    • Church leaders including Sunday school teachers, elders, or deacons.
    • Doctors, nurses, dieticians and other health professionals.
  • 46. Customizing Body & Soul
    • Steps to customization include:
    • Identify member needs and interests.
    • Identify existing church resources.
    • Work activities into the existing programs.
    • Identify resources in the community.
  • 47. Customizing Body & Soul
    • Finding resources
    • Locate resources that exist in the church to run Body & Soul.
    • Obtain other resources from the community.
    • Coordinator can assist church in locating these resources.
  • 48. Planning Body & Soul Activities
    • The planning team should:
    • Prepare a timeline and task list.
    • List resources needed for each activity.
    • Contact community organizations for assistance.
    • Promote activities.
    • Offer incentives for participation.
  • 49. Planning Body & Soul Activities
    • The planning team should:
    • Keep a record of
    • Body & Soul activities.
    • Attend Body & Soul events.
    • Monitor activities.
    • Schedule regular meetings.
  • 50. MOTIVATIONAL REMINDER:
    • Whether, then, you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.”
    • 1 Corinthians 10:31
  • 51. WRAP- UP…
    • Questions?
    • Do you think that the “Body and Soul” program is something Bethel Church could promote? If so, who should pursue it?
    • Are “Body and Soul” concepts something Bethel can incorporate? Or that this group can incorporate? If so, how?
    • What steps can this group take now to glorify God in what you eat and drink?
  • 52. FINAL QUESTION…
    • What steps can you take now to glorify God in what you eat and drink?