BlogOpen 2011 - Keynote - Tiffany St James

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Keynote presentation at BlogOpen 2011

Keynote presentation at BlogOpen 2011

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  • See why it’s so painful to operate in information markets?” I wanted to take you through what we know what we suppose what we predict
  • The largest and most comprehensive survey of the global digital consumer ever Forrester social technographs
  • INFORMATION COLLABORATION Since the channels for dissemination of information have changed and multiplied, new styles of communication are emerging How will crowd-sourcing influence the breadth and depth of not just educational and news media but other internet content as well? How have social networking sites and YouTube impacted how people experience, share, and create Our trust in communications has changed - The Global Web Index published this month tells us that: A family member of a close friend are the most trusted sources But a good contact on a social network are more credible than your neighbour of the store in which you are making a purchase A blog that you read regularly is more trused than a national newspaper or a television news reader It may be no surprise to some of you that you’ll trust twitter over politicians
  • Time Magazine http://bit.ly/gKArcx Iranians Protest Election, Tweeps Protest CNN Posted by  JAMES PONIEWOZIK  Monday, June 15, 2009 at 10:03 am 29 Comments  •  Trackback (15) Over the weekend, as protests over the alleged re-election win of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad swelled in Iran, reports on the unrest in the country  leaked out onto Twitter . (Even as the government of that country was evidently restricting access to opposition websites and text-messaging.) But in the Twitterverse,  a separate uprising took place , as tweets marked with the hashtag  #cnnfail  began tearing into the cable-news network for devoting too few resources to the controversy in Iran.  By yesterday, the hashtag revolt began to subside, as CNN—coincidentally or not—increased its on-air coverage of events in Iran. Whether or not Twitter had anything to do with it, the protest did show a few things:  * As much talk as there is about Twitter and other social media supplanting the likes of CNN in covering breaking news, they're really another source rather than a replacement—and Twitter users know that as well as anyone else. Thus, they want—and demand—big news organizations to step up, nimbly and responsively, to cover fast-changing events like this.  * If you follow the streams of tweets on the Iran election, they are unsurprisingly favorable to Mousavi, given that the conversation is dominated by Westerners and the sort of younger, urban Iranians who were Mousavi's base. One source of frustration seemed to be the reluctance of mainstream news organizations, CNN included, to quickly  question the legitimacy of the  vote—something hard to ascertain, however fishy things seemed, because Western news organizations don't have the kind of field polling and research in Iran that they do in, say, New Hampshire. (Outlets like the New York Times also came under fire on Twitter for coverage that readers thought were too credulous of the official results.)  * As Baynewser points out, another failing of CNN's was its  failure to use its own Twitter feed  better. Too busy worried about the competition from   @aplusk ?  * Even if Twitter is not an out-and-out replacement for breaking news coverage by TV, it is determinedly now a big voice in real-time media criticism. If you were following the election story over the weekend, let us know if you thought any outlets did an especially good (or bad) job. Read more:  http://tunedin.blogs.time.com/2009/06/15/iranians-protest-election-tweeps-protest-cnn/#ixzz1BU21YxC1 NY Times Protest in Moldova http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/08/world/europe/08moldova.html
  • You all seem smart people, so I don’t need to drive home the benefits of managing or being part of on an online community It’s a little context for my slideshare followers (all 5 of them) For individuals Connecting and sharing For businesses Data and engaging people is all very well but It might be useful to know as a brand owner that a Facebook Like was estimated at being worth $136 in July 2010 http://www.emarketer.com/Article.aspx?R=1007761 http://www.bazaarvoice.com/blog/2010/07/01/facebooks-like-button-is-worth-more-than-you-think-if-you-know-where-to-put-it/ We’ll look briefly at 5 or 6 types of online community
  • Be credible: Be accurate, fair, thorough Be consistent: Ensure that your communications are consistent in message and tone, pertinent to the appropriate channel and relationship Be transparent: Wherever possible disclose your position as a representative of your organisation Be relevant: engage in useful practicable communications for the best interest of the individuals and groups with which you are communicating Be an ambassador for your organisation: Act in the best interest of your organisation at all times Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. Be a civil servant Remember that you are an ambassador for your organisation. Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency
  • A Corporate Digital Strategy could form a significant part of a Corporate Communications Strategy
  • Be credible: Be accurate, fair, thorough Be consistent: Ensure that your communications are consistent in message and tone, pertinent to the appropriate channel and relationship Be transparent: Wherever possible disclose your position as a representative of your organisation Be relevant: engage in useful practicable communications for the best interest of the individuals and groups with which you are communicating Be an ambassador for your organisation: Act in the best interest of your organisation at all times Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. Be a civil servant Remember that you are an ambassador for your organisation. Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency
  • Be credible: Be accurate, fair, thorough Be consistent: Ensure that your communications are consistent in message and tone, pertinent to the appropriate channel and relationship Be transparent: Wherever possible disclose your position as a representative of your organisation Be relevant: engage in useful practicable communications for the best interest of the individuals and groups with which you are communicating Be an ambassador for your organisation: Act in the best interest of your organisation at all times Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. Be a civil servant Remember that you are an ambassador for your organisation. Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency
  • Be credible: Be accurate, fair, thorough Be consistent: Ensure that your communications are consistent in message and tone, pertinent to the appropriate channel and relationship Be transparent: Wherever possible disclose your position as a representative of your organisation Be relevant: engage in useful practicable communications for the best interest of the individuals and groups with which you are communicating Be an ambassador for your organisation: Act in the best interest of your organisation at all times Be credible Be accurate, fair, thorough and transparent. Be consistent Encourage constructive criticism and deliberation. Be cordial, honest and professional at all times. Be responsive When you gain insight, share it where appropriate. Be integrated Wherever possible, align online participation with other offline communications. Be a civil servant Remember that you are an ambassador for your organisation. Wherever possible, disclose your position as a representative of your department or agency
  • Some work arising from recommendations 1 and 5 of the Power of Information review identified 7 levels of engagement. As you go down the list, the level of engagement gets deeper.
  • Those digital agency at the Guardian that make difficult things easy to understand
  • You may remember back in April last year there were some slightly hysteric headlines in the mainstream press over the swine flu outbreak. But we wondered if this actually represented the public’s feelings at large? Were the public actually worried? And more inmportantly what information were they seeking and where were they looking online for this information?
  • Comment on each section
  • User Voice – polls user suggestions ‘ Commentariat’ themed Wordpress blog Digital Policy Twitter account COI Netvibes feed aggregator Uservoice Evaluated both the tools and processes used Seeded information where people went online Acted on feedback throughout the process People read about it online (mostly twitters + blogs) Viewed the processes online Fed back online Conducted the survey online

Transcript

  • 1. Digital Engagement: Citizens and Government Tiffany St James Blog Open Serbia, October 2011 @TiffanyStJames
  • 2. Multi-way engagement between government and citizens can no longer be ignored
  • 3. Eric Schmidt, Chairman, Google Inc Between the birth of the world and 2003, there were five exabytes of information created. We [now] create five exabytes every two days. In 2010 we created 5 exabytes of data every 2 days
  • 4. How we now target consumers What people do online, not what postcode or demographic is playing an increasingly larger role in consumer targeting
  • 5. Trust in communications Peer to peer recommendation now at 90%, trust in advertising 14%
  • 6. The landscape in 2007 Xkcd.com 2007: Sizes based on membership of a community
  • 7. The landscape in 2010 Xkcd.com 2010: Sizes based on social activity in a community
  • 8. Lobbyist will be using it Listen to what your lobbyists are saying on social channels
  • 9. Smart Mobs: Democracy in action? bit.ly/gKArcx nyti.ms/e5P1Ul gawker.com/5733816/
  • 10. The rules have changed We expect the government to be listening on social channels
  • 11. Embedding social media
  • 12. Engagement benefits
    • Connecting with like-minded individuals
    • Peer to peer recommendations
    • Stimulating the debate of your most interest
    • Engaging with people in the their spaces
    • eCRM
    • Data collation
    • Product, proposal, policy testing
    • Informing business, brand, policy strategy
    Start small, innovate, collate leverage cases, present risk solutions
  • 13. Use of social media in business
    • HR
    • PR
    • Direct sales
    • Customer Service
    • Business Intelligence
    5 uses of social media from @thebrandbuilder
  • 14. Digital Strategy – scoping Corporate Digital Strategy Brand Digital Strategy Campaign Digital Strategy Content Strategy Engagement / Social Media Strategy Corporate Comms Strategy Map where social media sits in the organisational structure
  • 15. Identify opportunities for comms
    • ACT ON CO2 Customer Journey
    Based on Prochaska’s theoretical model of behavioural change [Source: COI, UK Govt] Match social strategy opportunities with actual customer journeys
  • 16. Have a digital code of conduct
    • Be credible
    • Be consistent
    • Be transparent
    • Be relevant
    • Be an ambassador for
    • your organisation
    Set behavioural expectations for your staff
  • 17. Have a social media policy
    • Purpose
    • Principles
    • Statement of ethics
    • Context for organisation
    • Tools and services
    • Professional and personal use
    Set a framework so they know what they can and can’t do
  • 18. Have social media staff guidance Give your people ‘How to’ guidance
  • 19. Rebuttal Source: FreshNetworks
  • 20. Citizen engagement opportunites
  • 21. 7 Levels of engagement
      • Disseminating information
      • Monitoring
      • Gaining insight
      • Responding
      • Discussing
      • Consulting
      • Collaborating
    • Deeper engagement
    UK Government 7 levels of digital engagement
  • 22. From this… Infographics are critical to effective modern digital communication
  • 23. … To this Infographics are critical to effective modern digital communication
  • 24. Rich media broadcast Social media can be used for broadcast
  • 25. Rich photography Create rich shareable content
  • 26. Podcasts Create content in different mediums
  • 27. Departmental You Tube Channel
  • 28. Remember This? NOT PROTECTIVELY MARKED
  • 29. Social media monitoring If you do one thing: Listen to what people are saying
  • 30. Two-way engagement: Responding Create opportunities to solve local issues
  • 31.  
  • 32.  
  • 33. Multi-way engagement Link your social and digital platforms
  • 34. Campaign on multiple channels Have multiple channels through campaigns
  • 35. Collaborating Create apps to put the power in public hands
  • 36. Multi-way collaboration Co-create policy using public opinion
  • 37. Crowdsourcing service experience and improvement in policing Offer different ways to engage: keep channels open
  • 38. Through communities Take messages out through other community platforms
  • 39. Staffordshire police in the riots Use social channels in ultra-sensitive times
  • 40. Data.gov.uk Launch Plan Free your data: allow developers to create new value
  • 41. Our duty as citizens to ask or show the way
  • 42. ePetitions ePetitions: 100 000 signatures for parliamentary debate
  • 43. Competition to fund ideas Create competitions to gather insights
  • 44. Patient Opinion: crowdsourcing dignity in health and care Be aware of community sites involved in your agenda
  • 45. RewiredState.org If it doesn’t exist: show your government how
  • 46. Thank you! Tiffany St James on most social channels Let’s keep talking…. @TiffanyStJames Slides on http://slideshare.net/tiffanystjames
  • 47. Digital: • strategy • training programmes • social engagement • amplification