Status of Household Water Treatment and Safe Storage  in Ghana
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
178
On Slideshare
178
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Current Status of HWTS in Ghana Presentation by: Naa Lenason Demedeme Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development Ghana 6th May, 2013.
  • 2. Ghana • 24.97 million population occupying an area of  238,535 km2 • Accra: capital of Ghana • Ghana is a Unitary state with  ten(10) administrative regions • Ghana is one of the continent's  fastest growing economies,  and newest oil producer
  • 3. Burden of disease • The highest health priority areas are Maternal  Health and infant Morbidity/Mortality  • Causes of Infant Morbidity and Mortality are: • Low patronage of routine immunization in  children (vaccine‐preventable diseases) • Poor drinking water supply and inadequate  sanitation contributes to an estimated 10,000  deaths annually from diarrhoea related diseases,  the third largest killer of children under 5 years  of age
  • 4. National Health Strategies • Health Initiatives:  Malaria Control Program,  Ante natal and Post natal services  Expanded Program on Immunization  Vitamin A supplementation • Under‐5 mortality rate decreased from 155 in 1988 to 82 in  2008 per 1000 live births. • 96% of pregnant women receive antenatal care from a skilled  provider and 77% of women receive postnatal care within 41  days of delivery. • About 19% of children under 5 are diagnosed of malaria fever  every 2 weeks.
  • 5. Water and Sanitation Rural  Water 69 Urban 91 Total 80 100 60 Sanitation 9 21 91 80 86 92 92 79 70 69 15 56 40 38 Source: 2011 MICS 20 0 9 21 5 8 Water 9 15 15 Sanitation • Priority objectives (Sanitation): eliminate open defecation,  increase access to improved sanitation, Safe treatment and  disposal of faecal sludge, septage and sewage (decentralized  treatment facilities) • Priority objectives (Water): Increase access to water, equity in  water access and distribution, sustainability
  • 6. Integration • WASH is cross‐cutting in all the 8 MDGs and influences the  achievement of the various targets.  • Policies and National WASH Programme – Water and ES policies – CLTS – CWSP – Pursuing the Implementation of NESSAP/MAF/SWA  Compact
  • 7. Household water treatment and safe storage • HWTS refers to drinking‐water treated and kept safe at the point of  use( in the home, in schools, health care settings, etc.) • HWTS has significant potential to reduce water‐borne diseases (e.g.  diarrhoea) and achieve improvement in health of population of  Ghana especially children.  • 90.7% do not use any method for treating water • 1.6% Boil, 0.7% Add bleach, 3.3% Strain through Cloth, 0.9% Water  filter, 1.9 Stand and settle, 1.2% use camphor, 0.2 Water Tablets • HWTS products available are: Ceramic filters, Bio‐sand filters,  chlorine purification tablets among others.  • According to the UNICEF HWTS assessment report, many HWTS  products present challenge in terms of performance, portability,  affordability and maintenance. 
  • 8. Policy Framework • HWTS is a strategy under the National Water Policy  There is a TWG where decisions on HWTS are taken  Decisions are discussed at the NTWGS and the WSSWG for  approval   Implementation of decisions by the WASH structures at the  MMDA level • Policy and implementation challenges include; – Inadequate financial resources – Weak coordination – Poor Attitudes of the populace – Inadequate Private Sector Participation 
  • 9. Programmatic initiatives • Government has provided the needed enabling  environment for the private sector and limited support  to field workers to promote HWTS • A National strategy for HWTS has been developed  • Scaling – up and sustaining HWTS in Ghana: ‐ Using the Private sector for supply and delivery of  HWTS products ‐ Aggressive Social marketing and community  mobilisation ‐ Research & Monitoring, Policy Dialogue & Advocacy
  • 10. Opportunities / Challenges • Biggest opportunities for HWTS  the availability of vibrant private sector   critical mass of field staff    existence of HWTS strategy • Biggest challenge to scaling up HWTS in Ghana  inadequate incentives to the private sector   Inadequate resources for logistics to promote behaviour change (vehicles, fuel, promotion materials)