Dos and donts of training

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  • Highlight the link between good presentation skills and career growth and vice versa Explain how training helps develop better overall communications skills to use in many ways- with staff, team, managers, etc. Consider sharing an example of top presenter your audience may know/identify with
  • Interact with audience by getting them to talk about themselves and their related experiences, fears, etc. Have audience members share their expectations for today
  • Emphasize how normal it is to be anxious– you’re not alone: According to the book of lists, the fear of public speaking is the #1 fear of all fears; The fear of dying is #7 Even the most experienced presenters still get nervous- we’ll talk about some ways to combat your anxiety and direct that nervous energy to deliver an even better presentation
  • We’re going to help you craft and deliver effective presentations by focusing on the three core components of a presentation: Content, Look and Delivery We’re also going to give you a few tips on how to handle questions and deal with some of the unavoidable presentation challenges that may come your way
  • So let’s start talking about content. Before you even put pen to paper – or fingers to a keyboard -- consider what you want to accomplish with your presentation: Is it a call to action? Do you need them to do something as a result of the information you’re sharing- change their mind, advocate for you, etc.? Or are you simply sharing information (Share example of each) Next, think about your audience… Whatever you say, you need to frame it in your audience’s terms..So what? Why should I care? What’s in it for me? Will the information help them do their job better? Will it save them time/money? Also consider how general audience concerns may be different than the decision-maker’s concerns- focus first on the decision maker -- understand the key issues / metrics that concern that decision maker and try to tie your presentation to those issues.
  • Now that you know what you want to accomplish with your presentation, decide how best to structure your content to achieve that end Often, the easiest way to do this is to break your presentation content into sections: intro, body and conclusion Intro example- I’m (insert name), a presentation trainer, and I’m here to teach you how to be a more effective presenter by focusing on the three core components of a presentation: content development, crafting the look/feel of your presentation--content presentation, and content delivery
  • We’ve mentioned a few times already that “key messages” are an integral part of the Intro/Main Point– so what are key messages? The best way to get your audience to remember something is to deliver it on their terms– tell them how what you’re saying impacts or benefits them It will also help your audience remember the messages if they are crafted in simple, memorable words (go to next page for example)
  • Once you’ve established your main point with key messages, make your case by supporting and/or illustrating them One of the best ways to do this is with research or data, which adds credibility to argument/messages (share own example). In fact, Six Sigma project presentations are generally centered on data. As you are deciding what to include in your project reviews and other presentations, avoid the temptation to dive deep into every chart and statistical test you completed. You should also avoid reviewing the entire history of the project – just present the salient information that speaks to your point It’s also effective to use examples or personal anecdotes the audience can relate to; paint the picture (share own example and/or anecdote) Graphics and text help make your point by illustrating it All supporting elements are more effective when used sparingly and appropriately-- some points are obvious/self-explanatory and don’t need supporting data…consider if the research/data adds value
  • And finally, don’t forget to summarize and reinforce your key messages again in your conclusion. We’ll talk about a few tricks for doing this later in the presentation.
  • Let’s start with some general rules for text elements. Templates like the one I’ve used for this pitch provide a consistency in look and feel– a familiarity—that can help convey the message more clearly Avoid excess words and punctuation– you don’t need complete sentences; you supply the illustration and segue way Use font “flourishes” when appropriate and value-added…to add emphasis vs. distract unnecessarily Some text colors are better than others, consider the background. Avoid using red unless it’s really needed for emphasis, use should be limited. Green also tends to be difficult to read Use font without serif…GE likes Arial Don’t use a mixture of fonts . . . Doing so creates visual chaos that distracts from your message
  • Now that we have covered Content and Look, let’s review the third key element of effective presentations – delivery. It’s not only what you say verbally that conveys the message, but also how your body conveys it non-verbally Make sure that your verbal and non-verbal messages are in sync (ex. don’t look scared while you’re saying that you’re confident…) Demonstrate a few verbal and non-verbal messages; in-sync and out of sync
  • Let’s start by focusing on what you say– the things you need to do to ensure effective verbal delivery Deliver your key messages; repeat them frequently Don’t use language that your audience may not understand; avoid “inflated words” that sound formal or patronizing Engage your audience in the “conversation” by speaking to their needs directly…”this will help you by…” Flagging your message helps grab your audience’s attention by signifying something of importance- it says “pay attention” BUILD SLIDE TO SHOW “Verbal Don’ts” Try not to talk too fast, rushing your presentation It’s also important not to talk too much; don’t over-explain a point. If someone says, “got it,” move on . . . immediately Avoid jargon and acronyms, especially if your audience is new to the subject Don’t read your slides; practice your delivery enough times to commit it to memory Be aware of how you sound– don’t speak in a monotone voice; use appropriate inflection Avoid using verbal fillers when you need to pause or collect your thoughts, they are distracting; practice delivery without them
  • Stand up straight and confident, but not stiff Look at the people you’re talking to– it will help you engage them Move about naturally, make natural hand gestures and natural facial gestures; make sure your facial gesture syncs with what you’re saying BUILD SLIDE TO SHOW “Body Language Don’ts” Avoid nervous movements that distract audience (e.g., drumming fingers, jingling change, licking lips too often) Don’t turn you back on your audience for any reason, not even to point at your chart
  • Consider likely questions in advance: there is no better way to be prepared than to anticipate likely questions, especially tough questions Listen to the entire question: cutting the questioner off is rude and can cause you to miss the main point Take time to formulate a response: it’s ok to pause to gather thoughts. Repeat the question to buy yourself more time Deliver key messages: adds credibility to your “call to action” Don’t fake it if you don’t know the answer: it’s ok to say “I don’t know.” Follow up shortly with an answer Don’t lose your cool: always be professional, even if the questioner is out of line.
  • IT’S OK TO BE NERVOUS! The more you practice, the more confident you will feel Know the room: test all technical apparatus in advance Get familiar with the room layout and what you need to be comfortable (e.g., a podium, glass of water) Remember, nobody knows the material better than you– you’re the subject matter expert The audience often has a vested interest in your presentation, they are rooting for you to succeed Worst case scenario…you don’t knock it out of the park. Keep it in perspective; you’ll be harder on yourself than the audience is and you’ll do better next time
  • Review with audience
  • Review with audience
  • In sum, effective presentations require you to think about three things: Content: what do I want to accomplish with my presentation and what key messages will I use to convey that; what can use to justify those messages– data, research, etc.; how will I reinforce the messages in my conclusion What should my presentation look like- what vehicle do I use, what text or graphic elements are appropriate, what should I avoid doing How can I deliver this presentation most effectively with verbal and non-verbal delivery skills
  • Now that you have considered content-- what you’re going to say and how you plan to support and reinforce it– we’re going to focus on the “look” of your presentation. First, decide what presentation vehicle will work best for your audience and for your material In general, you want to consider the size of the group you’re presenting to and the type of information you are going to present For ex. if you’re conveying fairly simple and succinct information in a one-on-one meeting, Power Point is probably not the best option. For the purposes of this session, however, we’ll concentrate on Power Point since it best fits the requirements of your Six Sigma presentations (content & format) Always keep in mind your time limits when you’re crafting your presentation; don’t develop a 50-page presentation for a 30-minute pitch.
  • Now that you have considered content-- what you’re going to say and how you plan to support and reinforce it– we’re going to focus on the “look” of your presentation. First, decide what presentation vehicle will work best for your audience and for your material In general, you want to consider the size of the group you’re presenting to and the type of information you are going to present For ex. if you’re conveying fairly simple and succinct information in a one-on-one meeting, Power Point is probably not the best option. For the purposes of this session, however, we’ll concentrate on Power Point since it best fits the requirements of your Six Sigma presentations (content & format) Always keep in mind your time limits when you’re crafting your presentation; don’t develop a 50-page presentation for a 30-minute pitch.
  • Any questions/comments
  • This presentation was adapted from “Top notch Presentation skills “ membership.acs.org/y/ycc/download/Effective presentation s. ppt
  • Dos and donts of training

    1. 1. Do’s and Don'ts of Training!!
    2. 2. Objectives <ul><li>All of us are required to facilitate a workshop back in our countries – what to do!!!! </li></ul><ul><li>We pitch to cause an action or reaction </li></ul><ul><li>The skill set is simple; but we have all suffered through bad presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Training and practice can improve your skills </li></ul><ul><li>Strong presentation skills can help you deliver </li></ul>
    3. 3. Presentation skills improve with use <ul><li>Think about your presentation experiences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What did you do well? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What should you have done differently? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>How important is it to do better? </li></ul>
    4. 4. “ There are two types of speakers: those who are nervous and those who are liars” -- Mark Twain
    5. 5. What we’ll cover today <ul><li>Developing your presentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Content – focus on key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Do’s and don’ts </li></ul><ul><li>Taking questions </li></ul><ul><li>Problem solving </li></ul>
    6. 6. First, decide why you are presenting <ul><li>Establish the purpose of your presentation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Issue a “call to action” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ask yourself </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who is my audience? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How much do they know? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are their concerns? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What are their key metrics/issues? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build a bridge between you and your audience </li></ul></ul>
    7. 7. Planning <ul><li>Who are you talking to? </li></ul><ul><li>Why are you talking to them? </li></ul><ul><li>How long have you got? </li></ul><ul><li>What story are you going to tell? </li></ul>
    8. 8. Then, structure your presentation <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Who you are and why you are there </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Body </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reinforce key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Break information into sub-sections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make one point at a time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Summarize key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Ask for the order” </li></ul></ul>Conclusion Body Intro
    9. 9. “ Boil down” your key messages <ul><li>Key Messages: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 or 3 things you want audience to know or take action </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Sound bites” that will be remembered </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Key messages are </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clear </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Memorable </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simple </li></ul></ul>Intro
    10. 10. Make your case in the body <ul><li>Reinforce your key messages with supporting material </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Research or data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Examples and personal anecdotes </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Supporting text and graphics </li></ul></ul>Body Intro
    11. 11. Reinforce your case in the conclusion <ul><ul><li>Summarize key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be specific about what you want </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ask for the order </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make quick ties back to supporting data </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highlight next steps </li></ul></ul>Conclusion Body Intro
    12. 12. Supporting text & graphics should do just that <ul><li>Less is more </li></ul><ul><li>Limit bold , italics and CAPITALIZATION </li></ul><ul><li>Use easy-to-read colors and fonts </li></ul><ul><li>Stick to one font </li></ul>
    13. 13. You are also part of the message The following Do’s and Don’ts are simple – but how many times do you see others – or yourself – on the “Don’t” side?
    14. 14. Performance <ul><ul><li>Don’t Apologise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speak loudly and clearly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use short simple sentences </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid jargon and abbreviations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Vary pitch, tone, volume, speed and pauses </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avoid distracting mannerisms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Keep an eye on the remaining time </li></ul></ul>
    15. 15. How you say it is as important as what you say <ul><li>Verbal Do’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliver key messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use plain language </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use delivery techniques - Flags </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ The most important thing I want to say is...” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“ There are three things I want you to remember…” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Verbal Don’ts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Rush your delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Drag out your delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use jargon or acronyms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Read script/slides </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speak in monotone voice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Apologize for your charts, your content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use fillers such as “um,” “ah,” “er,” “like” </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. Your body also “talks” to your audience <ul><li>Body Language Do’s </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Hold yourself confidently </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use eye contact </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use natural gestures </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Engage your audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Smile </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Body Language Don’ts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stand slumped over </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Look at the ground </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use distracting, nervous movements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jiggle change or keys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turn your back to the audience </li></ul></ul>
    17. 17. How not to get tripped by questions <ul><li>Consider questions in advance and prepare responses </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to formulate a response </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver key messages in your responses </li></ul><ul><li>Even irrelevant questions are opportunity to reinforce messages </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t get defensive in tone or body language </li></ul><ul><li>If you don’t know the answer, say so </li></ul>
    18. 18. You can manage your nerves <ul><li>Practice makes perfect (and more confident!) </li></ul><ul><li>Visit workshop venue in advance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Become familiar with layout </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Secure and test all equipment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Have glass of water nearby </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Remember that you are the expert </li></ul><ul><li>Realize the audience wants you to succeed </li></ul>
    19. 19. Tackling other issues <ul><li>What do you do if… </li></ul><ul><li>You have 15 minutes instead of the planned hour </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talking fast won’t work </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limit yourself to the key concepts of each section </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Or, skip the visuals </li></ul></ul><ul><li>You lose your train of thought </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pause, collect yourself and start again </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The decision maker doesn’t show up </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Go on with the show </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make your appeal to delegates </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Tackling other issues <ul><li>What do you do if… </li></ul><ul><li>The projector breaks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Bring hard copies of your pitch </li></ul></ul><ul><li>People are holding a distracting side conversation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pause and ask if there are any questions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Move closer to them to get their attention </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In some cases, ask if they would prefer to reschedule </li></ul></ul>
    21. 21. There are three key aspects to effective presentations <ul><li>Content (focus on key messages) </li></ul><ul><li>Look </li></ul><ul><li>Delivery </li></ul>Conclusion Body Intro
    22. 22. Choose your delivery vehicle <ul><li>General considerations </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Audience size </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Content </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Location </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use Power Point if your presentation is </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data and information-heavy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Contains detailed or complicated material </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Requires graphic support to help make the case </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Whatever vehicle you choose, keep time parameters in mind when developing your presentation </li></ul>
    23. 23. <ul><li>Introduce yourself </li></ul><ul><li>Tell participants what will be covered and what they will gain </li></ul><ul><li>Explain the timetable and the activities </li></ul><ul><li>Point out the location of facilities (food, bathrooms, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Find out what people already know and what they are interested in learning </li></ul><ul><li>Make them feel at ease </li></ul>Getting Started
    24. 24. THANK YOU <ul><li>Questions </li></ul>
    25. 25. SOURCE <ul><li>This presentation was adapted from: </li></ul><ul><li>membership.acs.org/y/ycc/download/Effective presentation s. ppt </li></ul>

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