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Waste management in slums
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Waste management in slums

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  • 1. WASTE MANAGEMENT IN SLUMS
  • 2. WASTE COLLECTION IS EASIEST IN SLUMSSlum dwellers are always the most neglected sector for waste collection.They desire and understand the need for a clean environment and the costs of ill health.They are the most willing to cooperate in improved waste management efforts. 2
  • 3. SLUM DWELLERS ARE THE MOST WILLING TO PAY FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT Despite having lower incomes than other areas, collection is most forthcoming and easiest to collect in slums. 3
  • 4. FIVE EASY PROVEN METHODS FORWASTE COLLECTION AND TREATMENT1, Lorry at the slum entrance2, Door-to-door collection in handcarts3, Take-away bins in narrow lanes4, Shared bio-bins5, Community bio-bins 4
  • 5. LORRY AT SLUM ENTRANCESlum lanes are usually kept clean, but waste usually lies uncollected in large heaps just outside the slum entrance.It takes a lorry 15-20 minutes to load this.Instead, a lorry waits at slum entrance at a fixed time, while helper moves through slum with whistle to announce its arrival.Slum-dwellers come to lorry with their waste.Lorry pickup time and frequency unchanged.So no extra payment is required. 5
  • 6. DOOR-TO-DOOR COLLECTION IN HANDCARTSThis is done in Calcutta’s upgraded slums where lanes are paved and wide enough for movement.Waste is collected in the usual way in hand-carts at a fixed time of day.No payment is required as this replaces earlier lane-sweeping practices. 6
  • 7. TAKE-AWAY BINS IN NARROW LANES-1In Mumbai, slum assns appoint youths forcleaning work, before going to college or jobs.First a mass clean-up drive is undertaken.Then the new system is immediately started.7-8am : narrow open drains are swept clean.8am : 50-litre bins given by city are placed at path crossings, one per 25 homes or so. 7
  • 8. TAKE-AWAY BINS IN NARROW LANES-28-10 am : waste is carried from each home to nearest bin at residents’ convenience.10-11 am : All bins are removed and unloaded directly into waiting truck outside slum, and stacked till next day.City’s cooperation in regular and punctualpresence of lorry at 10-11am is vital !!Residents willingly pay Re 1 per head or Rs 5 per family. More for shops outside the slum. 8
  • 9. SHARED BIO-BINS : DHAKA MODELWaste Concern NGO provides 5-6 families a perforated barrel on a raised base, with compost layer at bottom as a starter bed.Residents must fill only kitchen waste daily in layers not more than ~50mm, for mulch- composting in the barrel.NGO buys the ready compost when barrel is full after 3 months or so.Demand is good and cooperation too, as residents see their waste as valuable. 9
  • 10. COMMUNITY BIO-BINS - 1 This bio-bin replaced a dirty overflowing waste container. It serves 125 families at Diamond Gdn Chembur, who pay for the program. Segregated waste is loaded daily by door-to- door collectors, bioculture is added & waste is turned. 10
  • 11. COMMUNITY BIO-BINS - 2 After 15 days, a similar bio-bin is used while the compost in 1st bin matures in 15 more days. Compost is not sold but used in flowerbeds for street beautification. 3 get employed, for an hour a day for dtdoor collection, street and drain cleaning, gardening + composting 11
  • 12. COMMUNITY BIO-BINS - 3140 such bio-bins are in use at Kochi on Rupee-A-Day scheme, in good demand for cleanliness in middle-income areas.Residents groups pay for installation of bio-bins. Kudumbashree womens’ self- help groups collect waste door-to-door, put kitchen waste in bio-bin, add culture and turn it. Sale of compost adds to their income. Being tried in slums now. 12

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