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HIV and Nutrition

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  • 1. TOPIC HIV/AIDS AND NUTRITION PRESENTED BY: HONEST CHIRWA
  • 2. INTRODUCTION
    • Most of the world’s 40 million people currently living with HIV/AIDS reside in communities already suffering from poverty and malnutrition.
  • 3. INTRODUCTION
    • HIV/AIDS has significant nutrition-related implications and consequences for individuals, families, and communities. In infected individuals, HIV contributes to and is affected by nutritional status.
  • 4. Nutrition Status affected
    • Needs high protein diet
  • 5. Consequences of HIV infection include
    • Inability to absorb nutrients from food.
    • Changes in metabolism.
    • Reductions in food intake due to HIV-related symptoms.
  • 6. Poor Nutrition
    • Increases the vulnerability to, and the severity of, opportunistic infections.
    • Reduce medication efficiency and adherence
    • Can accelerate the progression of disease.
  • 7. Symptoms of Acute Stage
  • 8. Objectives of food and nutrition assistance include:
    • Using food aid to improve the nutritional status of individuals affected by HIV/AIDS to increase the quality and duration of life, and to keep children affected by HIV/AIDS in ACTIVE.
  • 9. Objectives of food and nutrition assistance include:
    • Increasing overall food security in infected or affected households
    • Improving knowledge and promoting practices on the nutritional requirements of people living with HIV/AIDS
  • 10. Study
    • A recent study found that, compared with an average adult, a person with HIV requires 10 to 15 percent more energy
    • 50 to 100 percent more protein a day.
    • The Kcal intake is increased to 2500
  • 11. Chiradzulu
  • 12. The risk of malnutrition
    • Increases significantly during the course of the infection.
    • Good nutrition cannot cure AIDS or prevent HIV infection, but it can help to maintain and improve the nutritional status of a person with HIV/AIDS and delay the progression from HIV to AIDS-related diseases.
  • 13. Good Nutrition
    • Can improve the quality of life of people living with HIV/AIDS.
    • Nutritional care and support are important from the early stages of the infection to prevent the development of nutritional deficiencies.
  • 14. Good Nutrition
    • A healthy and balanced diet will help to maintain body weight and fitness.
    • Eating well helps to maintain and improve the performance of the immune system - the body's protection against infection - and therefore helps a person to stay healthy.
  • 15. Nutritional Assessment and Support of HIV Positive
      • Assessment:
    • Detailed diet history
    • A medication history: to include antiretroviral, any medications for opportunistic infection treatment, use of /vitamins, minerals, and other food supplements should not be taken unless prescribed by your doctor or nutritionist.
  • 16. Nutritional Assessment and Support of HIV Positive
    • Anthropometric data- height, weight, height-for-age, weight-for-age, weight-for-height, and head circumference in children up to 7 years of age.
    • Medications may need to be recalculated based on weight and height changes because the body surface area has changed.
  • 17. Nutritional Assessment and Support of HIV Positive
        • Evaluation of weight changes. The definition for AIDS Wasting Syndrome is 10% body weight loss. It is crucial to remember in pediatric patients, that this can amount to as little as a 1 kilogram (kg) weight loss.
  • 18. List of lab tests that are beneficial for HIV/AIDS & nutrition
          • Albumin and Prealbumin
          • Transferrin/Total Fe and % saturation
          • B12/Folate
          • CBC with Differential
          • Electrolytes
          • Liver and Renal Functions
  • 19. Conclusion
    • Good Nutrition is very important in HIV patients.
    • It is important to meet a Dietitian/Nutritionist for diet recommendations.
    • A frequently used and tolerated intervention is to encourage small, frequent feedings instead of a traditional three (3) meal pattern.
  • 20. Conclusion
    • In Infants Formulas can also be boosted with medical nutritional such as carbohydrate sources (Polycose®), protein sources (Promod®, Meritene®), or fat sources (Microlipid®).
  • 21. Conclusion
    • Other supplements available for older children greater than 8-10 years of age, include Pediasure®, Instant Breakfast type drinks, Resource®, and Scandishake® (high pro diet)
  • 22. THE END
    • THANK YOU
    • &
    • GOD BLESS

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