Facsimiles of Text and MusicFrom Distributed Resources                    Benjamin Albritton                  blalbrit@sta...
Overview• Brief context of current medieval manuscript  interoperability work• Andrew W. Mellon Foundation• Stanford and p...
The Problem• Medieval projects as “curated and  comprehensive” efforts• Technical and social silos• Expensive to maintain•...
The Goal• Toward a “commons” of distributed resources• Aggregating information and extensibility as  an alternate to “cura...
Text Repositories•   Long history•   Deep inventory•   Domain-specific (often)•   Some images•   Static Interface•   …
Image Repositories•   A “standard model”•   Lots of images•   Descriptive metadata•   Silo interfaces     • Built-in tools...
Repository to Repository                              Parker: CCCC 410 – De speculatione musice• One-off sharing• Human-br...
But what about…• Other resources  “about” an object  or text• … stored and  served in other  places• … that you might  not...
“Interoperability”• Step 1: Expose resources to  shared tools• Step 2: Enhance resources   • Match text to image   • Match...
Step 3: Enhance existing data
Step 4: CHMTL text + Parker image
Digital Facsimiles from          Distributed Resources• Parker image served from Stanford• Text provided by CHMTL• Linkage...
Aggregating distributed resources
Transcribing from Digital Surrogates                   La Terre de Secille
Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image     One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR
Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image      One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR   Fold A Open
Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR   Fold A Open   ...
Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR   Fold A Open   ...
The Shared Canvas     • Represents a real world thing we       want to “talk” about     • Has a unique name        •   htt...
Facsimiles are “about” a real thing
Parker Image re-served in  SharedCanvas viewer
Re-presented with text in side-by-side              view…
… or overlaid
The Distributed Facsimile
Examples of other resources attached          to the facsimile:                         • Detail images overlaid
Examples of other resources attached          to the facsimile:                           • User-generated                ...
Conclusion• Distributed resources exist independently of the  aggregation – could be re-presented in any UI• In short:  – ...
Thank You• More Info:   – Benjamin Albritton, Stanford University Libraries       • blalbrit@stanford.edu   – CHMTL & Dr. ...
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Facsimiles of Text and Music from Distributed Resources

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Presented at Indiana University, Center for the History of Music Theory and Literature, 2012.

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  • Can’t acquire each new resource through human interactions
  • , repositories provide the “killer carrot” not the “killer app”
  • New information for existing resourcesLine locations on image, line breaks in text
  • Facsimiles of Text and Music from Distributed Resources

    1. 1. Facsimiles of Text and MusicFrom Distributed Resources Benjamin Albritton blalbrit@stanford.edu Scholarly Editions and the Digital Age: Text and Music 31 August 2012, Bloomington, IN
    2. 2. Overview• Brief context of current medieval manuscript interoperability work• Andrew W. Mellon Foundation• Stanford and partners• What do we mean by “interoperability”?
    3. 3. The Problem• Medieval projects as “curated and comprehensive” efforts• Technical and social silos• Expensive to maintain• Difficult to extend
    4. 4. The Goal• Toward a “commons” of distributed resources• Aggregating information and extensibility as an alternate to “curated and comprehensive”• Allow people to do cool new stuff with our stuff (without losing our relevance)
    5. 5. Text Repositories• Long history• Deep inventory• Domain-specific (often)• Some images• Static Interface• …
    6. 6. Image Repositories• A “standard model”• Lots of images• Descriptive metadata• Silo interfaces • Built-in tools • No way to access outside “stuff” for comparison • Mediates use • Expensive to maintain
    7. 7. Repository to Repository Parker: CCCC 410 – De speculatione musice• One-off sharing• Human-brokered• But: • Expense • Not scalable • What if: • CHMTL wants images for all MSS of its texts? • Parker wants texts for all its music theory? • BNF wants… ? CHMTL: 1970, Corpus scriptorum text of De speculatione musice
    8. 8. But what about…• Other resources “about” an object or text• … stored and served in other places• … that you might not know about• How to build extensible facsimiles?
    9. 9. “Interoperability”• Step 1: Expose resources to shared tools• Step 2: Enhance resources • Match text to image • Match image to text• Exposure is low cost• Shared tools let other people make your stuff better• Specialists build the domain- specific tools
    10. 10. Step 3: Enhance existing data
    11. 11. Step 4: CHMTL text + Parker image
    12. 12. Digital Facsimiles from Distributed Resources• Parker image served from Stanford• Text provided by CHMTL• Linkage produced in T-PEN• Data for text re-stored at Los Alamos National Lab• Re-presented in a new environment that also allows presentation of even more annotations and links
    13. 13. Aggregating distributed resources
    14. 14. Transcribing from Digital Surrogates La Terre de Secille
    15. 15. Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR
    16. 16. Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open
    17. 17. Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open Fold A and B Open
    18. 18. Naïve Approach: Attach Transcription to Image One problem example: Multiple RepresentationsCCC 26 f. iiiR Fold A Open Fold A and B Open f. iiiV
    19. 19. The Shared Canvas • Represents a real world thing we want to “talk” about • Has a unique name • http://dms-data.stanford.edu/Parker/CCC026/canvas-12
    20. 20. Facsimiles are “about” a real thing
    21. 21. Parker Image re-served in SharedCanvas viewer
    22. 22. Re-presented with text in side-by-side view…
    23. 23. … or overlaid
    24. 24. The Distributed Facsimile
    25. 25. Examples of other resources attached to the facsimile: • Detail images overlaid
    26. 26. Examples of other resources attached to the facsimile: • User-generated comments (public and private) • Audio performances of notated music • Overlaid text transcription • Also: • Data sets • Mark-up • Base image choices
    27. 27. Conclusion• Distributed resources exist independently of the aggregation – could be re-presented in any UI• In short: – Expose repository and project data via API and common data models – Leads to: • Greater use of repository resources • Sustainability • Enhanced repository data • Cool new uses of the data we’ve already produced
    28. 28. Thank You• More Info: – Benjamin Albritton, Stanford University Libraries • blalbrit@stanford.edu – CHMTL & Dr. Giuliano Di Bacco, Indiana University • http://www.chmtl.indiana.edu/ – SharedCanvas • Author and architect: Robert Sanderson, Los Alamos National Lab – azaroth42@gmail.com • Description and implementations: – www.shared-canvas.org – T-PEN • PI: James Ginther (coming up next), Saint Louis University • Try it! – http://t-pen.org/TPEN – Slides (within a week) • http://www.stanford.edu/group/dmstech/

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