National Response Framework

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  • According to FEMA, emergency management must be: Comprehensive – considering and taking into account all hazards, all phases, all stakeholders and allimpacts relevant to disasters.2. Progressive – anticipating future disasters and taking preventive and preparatory measures to build disaster-resistant and disaster-resilient communities.3. Risk-driven – using sound risk management principles (hazard identification, risk analysis and impact analysis) in assigning priorities and resources. 4. Integrated – ensuring unity of effort among all levels of government and all elements of a community.5. Collaborative – creating and sustaining broad and sincere relationships among individuals and organizations to encourage trust, advocate a team atmosphere, build consensus and facilitate communication.6. Coordinated – synchronizing the activities of all relevant stakeholders to achieve a common purpose.7. Flexible – using creative and innovative approaches in solving disaster challenges.8. Professional – valuing a science- and knowledge-based approach based on education, training, experience, ethical practice, public stewardship and continuous improvement.
  • The private sector also is a key partner in local, tribal, state and federal incident management activities. The private sector is responsible for most of the critical infrastructure and key resources in the nation. They also provide goods and services critical to the response and recovery process, either on a paid basis or through donations. To engage these key partners most effectively, local, tribal, state and federal governments coordinate and establish appropriate roles and responsibilities. They also must train and exercise plans and procedures before an event occurs.
  • The National Response Framework supersedes the National Response Plan and more adequately serves as a guide to how the nation conducts incident response. The new name better aligns the document with its intent. The Framework presents the guiding principles that enable all response partners to prepare for and provide a unified national response to disasters and emergencies – from the smallest incident to the largest catastrophe. The Framework defines the key principles, roles, and structures that organize the way we respond as a Nation. It describes how communities, tribes, States, the Federal Government, and private-sector and nongovernmental partners apply these principles for a coordinated, effective national response. The National Response Framework is always in effect, and elements can be implemented at any level at any time.
  • The NRF is composed of two integrated parts: a printed component and an on-line component.The printed core document is the heart of the Framework. It describes response doctrine and guidance; roles and responsibilities; primary preparedness and response actions; and core organizational structures and processes. The core document will be reviewed every four years. The on-line component, named The NRF Resource Center (www.fema.gov/nrf), contains supplemental materials including annexes, partner guides, and other supporting documents and learning resources. Emergency Support Functions (ESFs) are mechanisms to group and provide Federal resources and capabilities to support State and local responders.Support Annexes are essential in supporting aspects of the Federal response common to all incidents.Incident Annexes outline incident-specific applications of the Framework.Partner Guides: is the next level of detail in response actions tailored to the actionable entity.This information is more dynamic and will change and adapt more frequently as we learn lessons from real world events, incorporate new technologies, and adapt to changes within our organizations.
  • Slide 35- The NEW NRF Resource CenterThe NRF Resource Center can be found at www.fema.gov/NRF. The Framework is supported by an online tool designed especially for emergency management practitioners, the NRF Resource Center. This online resource will grow and routinely evolve in support of the Framework and those who work with it. The core Framework should require significant change only infrequently. However, the operational planning and detailed work of developing stronger emergency management plans and capabilities will require a continued rapid pace of change in the months and years ahead. Source: National Response Framework: Frequently Asked Questions
  • Slide 35-ESFsThe Federal Government and many State governments organize much of their resources and capabilities – as well as those of certain private-sector and nongovernmental organizations – under 15 Emergency Support Functions (ESFs). ESFs align categories of resources and provide strategic objectives for their use. There is a coordinating agency for each ESF, as well as one or more primary and support agencies as well.Each ESF and important information regarding each one is available at the NRF Resource Center. The USDA is involved to some degree in each ESF. The Role of the USDA will be covered in the next module.
  • Slide-36 Support AnnexThe Support Annexes describe how Federal departments and agencies; State, tribal, and local entities; the private sector; volunteer organizations; and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) coordinate and execute the common functional processes and administrative requirements necessary to ensure efficient and effective incident management. During an incident, numerous procedures and administrative functions are required to support incident management. Each annex is managed by one or more coordinating agencies and is supported by various cooperating agencies. The USDA play a cooperating role in all but one of the 8 support annexes. Cooperating agencies are those entities that have specific expertise and capabilities to assist the coordinating agency in executing incident-related tasks or processes. When the procedures within a Support Annex are needed to support elements of an incident, the coordinating agency will notify cooperating agencies of the circumstances. Source: http://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf/nrf-support-intro.pdf
  • Slide 37-Incident AnnexesThe Incident Annexes describe the concept of operations to address specific contingency or hazard situations or an element of an incident requiring specialized application of the Framework. Of particular note to the USDA is the coordinating role it plays with the Department of Health and Human Services in the Food and Agriculture Incident Annex. Specific details may be found at the NRF Resource Center.Source: http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/incidentannexes.htm
  • Slide 38-CollaborateLessons Learned Information Sharing(LLIS.gov) is the national network of lessons learned, best practices, innovative ideas, and preparedness information for homeland security and emergency response professionals. By facilitating the sharing of knowledge, LLIS.gov enhances the nation's ability to prepare for and respond to all hazards.All response partners are encouraged to share lessons learned, best practices, and other resources related to the National Response Framework through the LLIS collaborative network.Source: http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf/collaboration.htm
  • Slide 39-Training ResourcesThrough the Emergency Management Institute, FEMA offers independent study courses, as well as information regarding training conducted by states. These courses directly support National efforts to train people at all levels on their role in the Framework. Source: http://training.fema.gov/nrfres.asp
  • Slide 40 – NRF Resource CenterThe NRF Resource Center is your virtual library and planning aid when it comes to the National Response Framework. Take time to become familiar with how to use the site and how it can assist you in performing your role in the Framework successfully.
  • Slide 52 – Role of the USDA in ESFsThe USDA or the Forest Service division of the USDA have supporting roles in every ESF. As noted earlier, the USDA takes the coordinating role for ESFs 4, Firefighting, and 11, Agriculture and Natural Resources.
  • Slide 53-Additional ESF InformationThe details of the USDA’s role in each ESF can be found online at the NRF Resource Center. Visit www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf.
  • Slide 54 – Role of the USDA in ESFsThe USDA also plays the part of a cooperating agency in the Support Annex for 7 of the 8 areas. Cooperating agencies are those entities that have specific expertise and capabilities to assist the coordinating agency in executing incident-related tasks or processes. When the procedures within a Support Annex are needed to support elements of an incident, the coordinating agency will notify cooperating agencies of the circumstances. The USDA Serves as the Sector-Specific Agencies or SSA for the Agriculture and Food Sector. The agency advises and assists in assessing impacts to meat, poultry, and egg products.
  • Slide 55 – Role of the USDA in ESFsThe Incident Annexes describe the concept of operations to address specific contingency or hazard situations or an element of an incident requiring specialized application of the Framework.The USDA plays a cooperating role in the Biological and Mass Evacuation Incident Annexes.In the Biological Incident Annex ,The Department of Agriculture (USDA) serves as the Government’s primary agency for outbreaks and/or attacks that may occur in animals used in the commercial production of food. USDA may also serve as the Government’s primary agency for attacks on food processing/slaughtering facilities under its regulatory purview. In the event of a food or animal event, HHS may provide additional public health and veterinary epidemiological assistance to USDA. Wildlife events will be placed under the purview of the Department of the Interior (DOI), while those involving marine animals will be managed and monitored by the Department of Commerce. For the Mass Evacuation Incident Annex, the USDA Provides guidance for the evacuation and collocation of companion and service animals. Provides staff and support for identifying housing for evacuees.
  • Slide 55-Incident Annex ChartThe USDA shares the coordinating role in the Food and Agriculture Incident Annex with the Department of Health and Human Services. Coordinating agencies support the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) incident management mission by providing the leadership, expertise, and authorities to implement critical and specific aspects of the response. In accordance with Homeland Security Presidential Directive 5, DHS retains responsibility for overall domestic incident management. The USDA provides leadership by assuring the safety and security of processed meat, poultry and egg products through the FSIS; coordinating animal and plant disease and pest response through the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS); and providing nutritional assistance through the Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). (Note: USDA, through FSIS, has statutory authority for meat, poultry, and egg products.)
  • Slide 62-EDEN and the Local CommunityThe national Cooperative Extension System doesn’t prescribe a role for disaster education. You will have to determine your role in your community based on local needs and partnerships. For example the Extension office at NDSU partnered with a local radio station during the 2009 flood to provide valuable information for area residents affected by the flood. The site was referred to on-air numerous times throughout the flood.
  • Slide 54 – Role of the USDA in ESFsThe USDA also plays the part of a cooperating agency in the Support Annex for 7 of the 8 areas. Cooperating agencies are those entities that have specific expertise and capabilities to assist the coordinating agency in executing incident-related tasks or processes. When the procedures within a Support Annex are needed to support elements of an incident, the coordinating agency will notify cooperating agencies of the circumstances. The USDA Serves as the Sector-Specific Agencies or SSA for the Agriculture and Food Sector. The agency advises and assists in assessing impacts to meat, poultry, and egg products.
  • National Response Framework

    1. 1. USDA’s Roles in theNational Response Framework<br />
    2. 2. Introduction<br />
    3. 3. USDA Agencies<br /><ul><li>National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA)
    4. 4. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
    5. 5. Forest Service (FS)
    6. 6. Food and Nutrition Service (FNS)
    7. 7. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)
    8. 8. Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS)
    9. 9. Rural Development (RD)
    10. 10. And 10 more</li></li></ul><li>Five Training Modules<br />1. Intro to Emergency Management<br />2. National Response Framework/NIMS<br />3. Emergency Support Functions<br />4. NRF Resource Center – NEW!<br />5. The Role of Extension<br />
    11. 11. Introduction to Emergency Management<br />Module 1<br />
    12. 12. Emergency Management<br /> “…the managerial function charged with creating the framework within which communities reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters.”Source: FEMA 2009<br />Weslaco, TX & Brownsville,TX – FEMA <br />
    13. 13. Vision of Emergency Management<br /><ul><li>Promote Safety
    14. 14. Reduce Vulnerability
    15. 15. Increase Capacity to Cope with Hazards and Disasters</li></ul>Houston, TX – FEMA<br />
    16. 16. Principles of Emergency Management<br /><ul><li>Comprehensive
    17. 17. Progressive
    18. 18. Risk-driven
    19. 19. Integrated
    20. 20. Collaborative
    21. 21. Flexible
    22. 22. Professional</li></li></ul><li>Emergency Managers’ Roles<br /><ul><li>Coordinate the planning process
    23. 23. Identify and analyze hazards
    24. 24. Inform stakeholders of potential threats
    25. 25. Coordinate stakeholder relationships
    26. 26. Coordinate resources
    27. 27. Manage activities</li></ul>Port Arthur, TX - FEMA<br />
    28. 28. Emergency Management: 4 Phases <br /><ul><li>Mitigation</li></ul>Remove or reduce impact<br /><ul><li>Preparedness</li></ul>Plan development, exercises and education<br /><ul><li>Response</li></ul>Actions during and immediately after disasters<br /><ul><li>Recovery </li></ul>Return to “normalcy”<br />Crystal Beach, TX – FEMA<br />
    29. 29. Some Possible Problems<br /><ul><li>Loss of electricity
    30. 30. Loss of potable water
    31. 31. Disruption of transportation routes
    32. 32. Broken natural gas lines
    33. 33. Loss of telephone communications,including cellular service</li></ul>Rancho Bernardo, CA . FEMA<br />
    34. 34. Effective Emergency Management<br />Local<br />Governments<br />State, Territorial & Tribal <br />Governments<br />National<br />Response<br />Framework<br /> Private Sector <br />& NGO<br />Federal<br />Government<br />
    35. 35. Local Government<br /><ul><li>First line of response
    36. 36. All disasters are local
    37. 37. Local leaders
    38. 38. Local emergency manager
    39. 39. Citizen Corps (i.e. CERT Programs)</li></ul>Madisonville, KY – FEMA <br />
    40. 40. State Government<br /><ul><li>Assist local government
    41. 41. Create EMAC agreements with other states
    42. 42. Request federal assistance when needed</li></ul>Paducah, KY - FEMA <br />
    43. 43. Tribal Government<br /><ul><li>May require assistance from neighboring jurisdictions
    44. 44. Have a right to self-government
    45. 45. Responsible for coordinating resources
    46. 46. Federal assistance via the Stafford Act must be requested by the state governor</li></ul>Standing Rock Reservation, ND - FEMA<br />Washington, DC - FEMA<br />
    47. 47. Nongovernmental Organizations<br />National VOAD<br />
    48. 48. Private Sector<br />
    49. 49. Federal Assistance<br /><ul><li>Assists when needs exceed local and state resources (HSPD 5)
    50. 50. Governor may request Presidential Disaster Declaration
    51. 51. Aid may be provided without a major disaster or emergency declaration</li></li></ul><li>It’s about what’s important to you.<br />Fargo, ND – FEMA<br />
    52. 52. The National Response Framework (NRF)<br />and<br />National Incident Management System (NIMS)<br />Module 2<br />
    53. 53. National Response Framework (NRF)<br /><ul><li>Principles for a unified national response
    54. 54. Defines key principles, roles and structures
    55. 55. Describes how the different partners may apply these principles in a coordinated and effective manner
    56. 56. The NRF is always in effect</li></li></ul><li>What’s NEW in the NRF?<br /><ul><li>Improved Annexes and Appendices
    57. 57. New Guides for Response Partners
    58. 58. Clearer Terminology
    59. 59. Clarified Roles and Responsibilities
    60. 60. Major Annex Changes
    61. 61. Broader Scope
    62. 62. Wider Audience
    63. 63. Integrated Key Concepts
    64. 64. Expanded Focus on Partnerships
    65. 65. Updated planning section</li></li></ul><li>Organization of the NRF<br />Doctrine, organization, roles and responsibilities, response actions and planning requirements that guide national response<br />Core Document<br />Mechanisms to group and provide Federal resources and capabilities to support State and local responders<br />Emergency Support <br />Function Annexes<br />Support <br />Annexes<br />Essential supporting aspects of the Federal response common to all incidents<br />Incident<br />Annexes<br />Incident-specific applications of the Framework<br />Partner Guides<br />Next level of detail in response actions tailored to the actionable entity <br />Source: www.fema.gov/nrf<br />
    66. 66. NRF Response Doctrine<br />
    67. 67. NIMS and NRF<br />
    68. 68. NIMS Command and Management<br /><ul><li>Incident Command System
    69. 69. Multiagency Coordination Systems
    70. 70. Public Information</li></ul>Snohomish, WA – FEMA <br />
    71. 71. Module 2. National Response Framework and National Incident Management System<br />Existing Authority<br />
    72. 72. Module 2. National Response Framework and National Incident Management System<br />National Response Framework<br />When we fail to work as a team, we fail our citizens…”<br />- W. Craig Fugate, Director of the Florida Division of Emergency Management<br />www.floridadisaster.org<br />
    73. 73. Module 2. National Response Framework and National Incident Management System<br />Additional Online Training<br />National Response Framework (NRF) Training<br />IS-800.B National Response Framework, An Introduction<br />National Incident Management System (NIMS) Training<br />IS-700.a National Incident Management System (NIMS): An Introduction<br />These and other independent study courses may be found at:<br />www.training.fema.gov/IS<br />
    74. 74. the National Response Framework and the Role of the USDA<br />
    75. 75. NRF Resource Center<br />Module 3<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    76. 76. The NEW NRF Resource Center<br />www.fema.gov/nrf<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    77. 77. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    78. 78. Support Annexes<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    79. 79. Incident Annexes<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    80. 80. Collaborate<br />LLIS.gov<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    81. 81. Training Resources<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    82. 82. NRF Resource Center<br />Doctrine, organization, roles and responsibilities, response actions and planning requirements that guide national response<br />Core Document<br />Mechanisms to group and provide Federal resources and capabilities to support State and local responders<br />Emergency Support <br />Function Annexes<br />Support <br />Annexes<br />Essential supporting aspects of the Federal response common to all incidents<br />Incident<br />Annexes<br />Incident-specific applications of the Framework<br />Partner Guides<br />Next level of detail in response actions tailored to the actionable entity <br />Source: www.fema.gov/nrf<br />Module 3. NRF Resource Center<br />
    83. 83. the National Response Framework and the Role of the USDA<br />
    84. 84. Emergency Support <br />Functions (ESFs)<br />Module 4<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    85. 85. Agency Roles under the NRP<br /><ul><li>Coordinating Agency
    86. 86. In unified command, coordinates designated primary and support agencies</li></ul>Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    87. 87. Agency Roles under the NRP<br /><ul><li>Coordinating Agency
    88. 88. In unified command, coordinates designated primary and support agencies
    89. 89. Primary Agency
    90. 90. Federal agency that serves as a federal executive agent to accomplish the ESF mission</li></ul>Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    91. 91. Agency Roles under the NRP<br /><ul><li>Coordinating Agency
    92. 92. In unified command, coordinates designated primary and support agencies
    93. 93. Primary Agency
    94. 94. Federal agency that serves as a federal executive agent to accomplish the ESF mission
    95. 95. Support Agency
    96. 96. Provides information and logistical support for primary agencies in an ESF</li></ul>Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    97. 97. Emergency Support Function (ESF)<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    98. 98. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    99. 99. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    100. 100. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    101. 101. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    102. 102. Emergency Support Functions<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    103. 103. Role of the USDA in ESFs<br />http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    104. 104. Additional ESF Information<br />http://www.fema.gov/pdf/emergency/nrf<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    105. 105. USDA in the Support Annex<br /><ul><li>Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources
    106. 106. Financial Management
    107. 107. International Coordination
    108. 108. Private-Sector Coordination
    109. 109. Public Affairs
    110. 110. Tribal Relations
    111. 111. Volunteer and Donations Management</li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    112. 112. USDA in the Incident Annex<br /><ul><li>Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources
    113. 113. Financial Management
    114. 114. International Coordination
    115. 115. Private-Sector Coordination
    116. 116. Public Affairs
    117. 117. Tribal Relations
    118. 118. Volunteer and Donations Management</li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    119. 119. Food and Agriculture Incident Annex<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    120. 120. USDA Agencies<br /><ul><li>Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS)
    121. 121. Cooperative State Research, Education and Extension Service (CSREES)
    122. 122. Forest Service (FS)
    123. 123. Food and Nutrition Service (FNS)
    124. 124. Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS)
    125. 125. Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS)
    126. 126. Rural Development (RD)
    127. 127. And 10 more</li></li></ul><li>the National Response Framework and the Role of the USDA<br />
    128. 128. The Role of the <br />Extension Disaster Education Network (EDEN)<br />Module 5<br />Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />
    129. 129. The Role of Extension<br />
    130. 130. All Disasters are Local<br />Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Fargo, ND - FEMA <br />
    131. 131. NDSU and the 2009 Flood<br />Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />
    132. 132. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Organizational Planning<br /><ul><li>Office and home preparedness
    133. 133. Communication
    134. 134. Contacts
    135. 135. Guidelines
    136. 136. Resources</li></ul>Galveston, TX-FEMA <br />
    137. 137. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Preparedness<br /><ul><li>Disaster supplies kits
    138. 138. Family communication plans
    139. 139. Ready Business
    140. 140. Farmstead security</li></li></ul><li>Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Mitigation<br /><ul><li>Reduce impact on lives
    141. 141. Reduce impact on property
    142. 142. Reduce impact on the environment</li></ul>Fargo, ND - FEMA<br />
    143. 143. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Response<br /><ul><li>Actions taken during or immediately after a disaster</li></ul>Fargo, ND-FEMA<br />
    144. 144. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Recovery<br /><ul><li>Return to normalcy
    145. 145. Research-based information</li></ul>Sekiu, WA-FEMA<br />
    146. 146. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Ag Damage Assessment<br /><ul><li>Crop losses
    147. 147. Livestock deaths
    148. 148. Farm structure damage</li></ul>Marysville, CA-USDA<br />
    149. 149. First Detectors<br />Module 5. The Role of Extension<br /><ul><li>Detect the problem
    150. 150. Contact experts</li></ul>Minot, ND-NDSU<br />
    151. 151. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Media Work<br /><ul><li>Newsletters
    152. 152. Fact sheets
    153. 153. Newspaper articles
    154. 154. Radio and TV interviews
    155. 155. Web pages</li></ul>Grand Forks, ND-NDSU <br />
    156. 156. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Volunteer Management<br />Fargo, ND-FEMA. <br />
    157. 157. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Community Networking<br /><ul><li>Skills
    158. 158. Resources
    159. 159. Contacts
    160. 160. Culture
    161. 161. Insights</li></ul>Waveland, MS-FEMA<br />
    162. 162. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Education<br />New Orleans, LA-FEMA <br /><ul><li>Research-based education</li></li></ul><li>Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Extension Disaster Education Network<br />www.eden.lsu.edu<br />
    163. 163. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Information and Training<br />
    164. 164. DHS Centers<br />Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />
    165. 165. Module 2. National Response Framework and National Incident Management System<br />Nongovernmental Organizations<br />National VOAD<br />
    166. 166. Module 5. The Role of Extension<br />Be Prepared!<br />
    167. 167. Information Resources<br /><ul><li>Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources
    168. 168. Financial Management
    169. 169. International Coordination
    170. 170. Private-Sector Coordination
    171. 171. Public Affairs
    172. 172. Tribal Relations
    173. 173. Volunteer and Donations Management</li></ul>http://www.fema.gov/emergency/nrf<br />Module 4. Emergency Support Functions<br />
    174. 174. Information Resources<br />FEMA Independent Study Program, IS-1 - Emergency Management: An Orientation to the Position<br />Source: FEMA Independent Study Program, IS-230 - Principles of Emergency Management<br />National Response Framework: Overview <br />http://www.emacweb.org/<br />National Response Framework: Overview and FEMA: What’s New in the National Response Framework<br />

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