Orienteering Web

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Orienteering Web

  1. 1. UNIT 9 ORIENTEERING
  2. 2. Orienteering A sport that involves land navigation over unfamiliar terrain with a map and compass
  3. 3. Benefits of Orienteering The benefits of Orienteering are many: • Builds self confidence • Enhances team building • Improves map reading • Teaches a lifetime sport • Provides mental challenges • Provides physical challenges
  4. 4. Orienteering The object of orienteering is to run, ski, walk, or mountain bike to a series of points shown on a map. These points are called control points.
  5. 5. Orienteering Course lengths range from less than 1 mile for beginners to 4 or more miles for experienced orienteers.
  6. 6. The Well-Dressed Orienteer Lightweight Compass Long Sleeve Shirt Looped At Wrist Wristwatch Tear Resistant Old Pants Shin Guards Old Shoes
  7. 7. Map Reading Orienteering usually requires the use of a topographic map depicting the area in which the course is laid out. A topographic map is a graphic representation of manmade and natural features of a part of the Earth's surface.
  8. 8. Topographic Map Orienteering maps usually are drawn to a scale of 1:15,000 or 1:10,000, and have 5-meter contour lines or intervals. They also show large boulders, cliffs, ditches, and many other features. Some of the other features that may be shown are listed on the next screen.
  9. 9. Features Boundaries Dams Bridges Railroads Buildings Rivers Caves/Mines Roads/Trails Coastal Features Pipelines Contour Lines Bodies of Water • Elevations Fences And this is only a partial list!
  10. 10. The most useful scale for an orienteering map is: 1:15,000 or 1:10,000 1 inch on the map Represents 15,000 or 10,000 inches on the ground)
  11. 11. Direction On most maps, north is at the top, south to the bottom, east to the right, and west to the left. There is a slight difference between the location of the north pole and that of magnetic north. This is the variation angle or declination angle.
  12. 12. Magnetic Declination Lines on an Ungrided Map
  13. 13. Colors on Topographic Map water (lakes, ponds, rivers, streams, marshes) rock features (boulders, cliffs), roads, trails, fences, buildings forest with little or no undergrowth that allows for easy passage vegetation that requires unusual effort to traverse open or unforested land land features, contours, earth banks, sandy ground
  14. 14. Legend Relief features of the Earth are shown in the margins of orienteering maps.
  15. 15. Contour Lines Brown contour lines represent valleys, hills, and plains. Spacing between lines represents a constant vertical distance; the closer the intervals, the greater the slope.
  16. 16. When lines are close together, they show a steep slope. Similarly, when they are far apart, they show a gentle slope. Contour interval is the distance (feet or meters) between lines.
  17. 17. If the map contour interval is 10 feet, this hill is approximately 130 feet high.
  18. 18. Contour lines indicate elevation, in feet or meters, above sea level. Contour lines tell you the ups and downs of the land.
  19. 19. Typical Magnetic Compass Silva Type 3 • A must for orienteering • Contains protractor in base for reading magnetic azimuth angles on a map • Most widely used
  20. 20. The orienteering compass has a protractor base and a cord to hang around the neck (optional).
  21. 21. During orienteering, first obtain the magnetic azimuth or bearing. • Place edge of protractor base along desired line of travel. • Turn compass housing until orienteering arrow aligns with magnetic north reference lines. • Turn your body until the red end of magnetic needle aligns with the orienteering arrow.
  22. 22. Distance is Important in Orienteering to: • Determine distances between control points. • Determine distances actually traveled.
  23. 23. Distance on a Map If a map has a scale of 1:25000, and a distance of 2 cm were measured on the map between two locations, then the actual distance along the ground would be: 2cm x 250m/cm = 500m on the ground
  24. 24. Distance on a Map Another method is to lay off the measured distance on the map along the graphic linear distance scale on the map. This can then give you the desired distance along the ground in feet, meters, miles, or kilometers.
  25. 25. Distance on a Map A third method is to use the map scales printed along the sides of the compass protractor base. These are often standardized to read distances along the ground directly in feet or meters.
  26. 26. In the field, your pace is used to measure distance. Your pace is the average length, in meters, of a double step.
  27. 27. To determine your pace, count the number of double strides you make on a 600-meter course. This should be done while both running and walking.
  28. 28. Land Navigation Techniques Several methods of land navigation techniques may be used. Depending on the terrain, one of the following methods may be used: • The beeline • The steering mark • The contour route
  29. 29. Beeline A straight line is followed to the desired location, by observing terrain features, without the use of a compass.
  30. 30. Steering Mark Once the bearing (direction of travel) is determined, travel to easily identifiable way-points (steering marks), such as trees, rocks, or houses along the way.
  31. 31. Contour Route If you use a contour line as a trail, you would be traveling parallel to mean sea level. This method is less tiring and more accurate than the beeline method because up and down hill travel is minimized.
  32. 32. Aiming Off In this example, the orienteer follows an azimuth slightly to the right of control point 3, proceeds to the stream (the catch feature), turns left, and follows the stream to the control point.
  33. 33. A Catching Feature • A linear feature that lies beyond the control (example: a road or fence) • Passes by, through, or near a control • "Saves" you if you should miss the control and go past it
  34. 34. Attack Point • A prominent feature near a control (100 - 150 meters) • Used to get you close to a control as quickly as possible • Numerous attack points on beginner courses • Few attack points on advanced courses
  35. 35. Before You Start First, stop and look around; then look closely at your map. Observe the lay of the land. Find some fairly distinct feature, or better yet, a group of features, within view and on the map. Can you see any collecting features, catching features, or handrails that will help you get to the first control?
  36. 36. Handrail • Any linear feature you can follow to where you want to go • Examples: a stream, trail, road, fence, brick or stone wall
  37. 37. Slope Slope is the steepness of a hill, usually expressed as a ratio, e.g., 1 to 15 or 1:15, meaning 1 meter of rise for every 15 meters of horizontal distance.
  38. 38. Profile Profile refers to the shape of a hill. Three general profiles are: Concave - steeper as it get higher Convex - steeper at the bottom Uniform - constant slope from bottom to top
  39. 39. Weather An important factor in flat country
  40. 40. Ground Cover Factors The effect of ground cover can be converted to equivalent amounts of level ground travel by using a conversion formula. The formula involves multiplying the distance by the appropriate factor in the following list.
  41. 41. Types of Cover Factor Open trail 1 Waist-high grass 1.5 Open forest 2-3 Thick brush 5 Creek-bottom tangles 7-10 This indicates it would take 7-10 times longer to cover creek-bottom tangles than it would to jog along an open trail.
  42. 42. Rough Orienteering • Use map to get general idea of objective (how far it is and where you want to go). • Proceed at top speed to collecting features and continue to the control.
  43. 43. Fine Orienteering • Requires slower movement and continually checking map • Smaller features used as landmarks • Slow and inefficient for use for entire leg of course
  44. 44. Speeds of Orienteering Green light – used for rough orienteering on the easy parts of a course where a running pace is possible
  45. 45. Speeds of Orienteering Green light – used for rough orienteering on the easy parts of a course where a running pace is possible Yellow light – a slow jog or fast walk, being cautious when approaching a hand- rail or an attack point
  46. 46. Speeds of Orienteering Green light – used for rough orienteering on the easy parts of a course where a running pace is possible Yellow light – a slow jog or fast walk, being cautious when approaching a hand- rail or an attack point Red light – a slow walk in order to use fine orienteering to locate a control
  47. 47. Speeds of Orienteering All course legs may not lend them- selves to all three speeds. Learning when to use which speed during rough and fine orienteering comes only through experience.
  48. 48. Course Layout Criteria • A well-wooded area (lots of trees) • Uninhabited if possible • Appropriate degree of difficulty for the orienteers who will be using it • Good map coverage of suitable scale
  49. 49. Course Layout Criteria Circles are control points. A triangle indicates the start. A double circle indicates the finish.
  50. 50. Control Marker • Should be visible from at least 10 meters away but not more than 50 • Usually attached is a distinctive punch used as 'proof' you were at that control marker
  51. 51. Control Marker
  52. 52. Safety Lane • Usually a linear boundary (a road) where an orienteer may go in the event of injury, fatigue, or becoming lost
  53. 53. Orienteering Activities Cross-country (point-to-point) – the classic form of orienteering. Controls on a map must be visited in order.
  54. 54. Orienteering Activities Cross-country (point-to-point) – the classic form of orienteering. Controls on a map must be visited in order. Score-O – Controls are visited in any order.
  55. 55. Orienteering Activities Cross-country (point-to-point) – the classic form of orienteering. Controls on a map must be visited in order. Score-O – Controls are visited in any order. Night-O – a variation on either of the above conducted from dusk through dark.
  56. 56. Orienteering Activities Long-O – Courses are 1.5 to 2 times as long as a standard course, and have long legs and complex route choices.
  57. 57. Orienteering Activities Long-O – Courses are 1.5 to 2 times as long as a standard course, and have long legs and complex route choices. Relay-O – A variation of point-to-point. Each team member completes a leg of a course.
  58. 58. Orienteering Activities Long-O – Courses are 1.5 to 2 times as long as a standard course, and have long legs and complex route choices. Relay-O – A variation of point-to-point. Each team member completes a leg of a course. Memory-O – The first leg of the course is memorized. After reaching control 1, the second leg is memorized before going to control 2.
  59. 59. Orienteering Activities Recently, a new orienteering activity has been added to the list of "O" activities. This is: Trail-O – an orienteering course laid out specifically for handicapped individuals. Trails are either on firm ground or paved paths. Once a control point is reached, the individual must observe specific land- scape features and make the most accurate estimates of distance, time of travel, height and other required items.
  60. 60. Novice Advanced Control Descriptions Clue Sheet
  61. 61. The previously shown symbols are only a few of the many used in the sport of orienteering. A more comprehensive listing and their meanings are available through links provided at the United States Orienteering Federation (USOF) Web site at: http://www.us.orienteering.org
  62. 62. The Orienteering Event Card Ensure you fill out and punch your event card as required.
  63. 63. The Rules of Orienteering Like all sports, certain rules must be followed. Fairness – a sporting attitude and a spirit of comradeship and honesty Nature of orienteering – no outside help; yet provide appropriate assistance if one is injured or honestly lost Environmental protection – take care of the land you are on, obeying common sense rules and following posted signs
  64. 64. Qualification Requirements for the NJROTC Orienteering Ribbon 1. You must be a cadet in good standing. 2. Point out and name five major terrain features on a map and in the field. 3. Point out and name ten symbols often found on a topographic map. 4. Use a compass effectively.
  65. 65. 5. Measure distances on a map using a straight edge. 6. Explain "descriptive clues," "aiming off," and "attack point." 7. Determine, by length of pace and speed, both walking and running, when a distance of 100 meters has been covered over various types of terrain.
  66. 66. 8. Successfully complete at least two 3,000- to 4,000-meter cross-country courses. After completion of each course, the NSI will debrief (critique) you on your results.
  67. 67. Subsequent Awards A star may be awarded for orienteering participation in the first and subsequent years. A maximum of two awards per year (including the initial ribbon award) are authorized. Different orienteering courses must be used for subsequent awards.
  68. 68. ORIENTEERING End Of CFM Material

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