Drug Addiction Counseling

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Drug Addiction Counseling by Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation, a sister concern of Brahma Kumaris

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Drug Addiction Counseling

  1. 1. National Campaign My India, Addiction Free India DRUG ADDICTWO COUNSELING Medical Wing (Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation) PRAJAPITA BRAHMA KUMARIS ISHWARIYA VISHWA VIDYALAYA Ever Healthy Hospital, Shantivan Complex Abu Road, Rajasthan © 2013 Medical Wing of Ftajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. .7 '3" _ . ~ _ _ . ‘ r . ‘ . ,__ 2 . . -_g‘. —. : 'n- I n. .' v. » v ' - . if , 5.; . x ‘.5 __~-- 7 - , - . . * __ f ; ‘—. , . , , - . '* (hr. . ~. __ -. r g’ . , A M ’_~. . ‘ '_ . - i . I'‘_ "I r_. .. ‘.f - . , _. ‘. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. CONTEXT FOR COUNSELING discrimination, stigmatization and rejection often viewed as criminals and outcasts a target for society’s anger and fear © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. CC)t‘, lTE: XT F-Cow CU l-ll~. l M Q V TH“ . . _ t do drug users worry about? > F‘ Idler [.11 air Ctr-‘iV. ,i". I,l, l.I, I,I_r‘-. l LP in fill irr-. r.. u:; .;. ..-. u;. .n Axrtrr-: :s: I l. ml F W vfi C<nI. I.'u. ~«-—r. iTI. u-_' 'A"7l, I,l : wrnfrflr , . . l . l . L . .. ‘ 'i. .I_I'-Ir: l. ‘-. I,“‘. ,I, l,l! .' ‘-. I;xrII. Ii i. .I_l‘-idler fir ll; |. ::1:. r P‘ P‘ © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. *~iIt i s. BEYOND MORALLY WEAK ALL ARE ADDICTS ALL ARE CRIMINALS
  6. 6. COUNSELING Counseling is an interactive exchange process between counselors and clients to help clients confidentially explore their problems and enhance their capacity to solve their own problems. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. flxllllll 0 F Cl? l. lll§El-lll< 9' ®= oR , . A ‘r'. -»_. DVI l lA5:, %7awGE T 99¢
  8. 8. AIM OF COUNSELING $21: > To help clients take charge of their lives 1{k. hm, ,|_‘. ,m, S M. Ll“. > To develop their ability to make wise and realistic decisions > To assist to alter their behavior to produce desirable results > To provide information for informed decision making Counseling can be for individuals, couples, groups or families © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. -/ _, /I‘ f u 1- ‘I I I‘ W. ‘I’ / J. I‘ L ‘V ‘ I. P . ‘ I n I 9 -' 1-‘ . '. ~ve Fae» if . /. ¥s _)__)___4 , .
  10. 10. COUNSELING IS NOT >TELLING OR DIRECTING >A CONVERSATION >AN INTERROGATION >A CONFESSION >PRAvING © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. CO Ui ! SEl_li ! G }'r‘ / I‘ 1 ’f‘- I ‘at _}’. '§§")4l_' , . ' . « T‘ L C ’T. .:. % , ‘LL 2.; , 2- . -4 '~ J 3-. x , _ N '~‘* —— -, .~ ifs”? "‘ o‘ 5 . . ‘W/4*” : ". ‘ » r ‘ e . ‘:5, 0 aka z‘»~>4. ../ /'. ’§"“-*4.‘ lx/ ‘xv-W $57 [1 F‘ - 1,»? :4 ». l-' f'_ /5 J‘ K : ‘, ';'i - _ ""37; , ,-7;} r ' ”_ — . ‘ I r - -' 4 ; ,-. ./ . w,_-; — ~ _, . N/ ’ 1/‘ . _/ .‘ "5 % , __k l V"-‘ ‘#2’: 9- / *9: PF, '5-: ',. . ‘. “"_v’ -/ , ‘ V, 1.“ . r V‘; ’. -‘,3’? ;‘—. ‘:L/ ,’ “&>«’{4‘K’“l"“. T‘ r3 ‘2.—“"r v‘ ' ' _-_-. . - ' - , ‘ 3.r~, ;;‘; ‘~‘. V7'(, “Q g 2 It ‘ , $‘. ~./ " ‘ _l _ _«V x ; gm ‘/ $5 l-lEAl_Tl-l ED UCATlCLi I -© 201:; MedicalJNingof Rajayoga Education &Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  12. 12. COUNSELING / Confidential / Issue-oriented / Usually one-to-one or small group / Evokes strong emotions in both client and counselor / Counselor listens attentively and reflects / Focused, specific and goal-oriented / Aims at changing attitudes and behaviors / Based on needs of the clients © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. HEALTH EDUCATION / To increase knowledge and to educate / Based on public health needs / Small or large groups of people / Emotionally neutral in nature / Not usually confidential / Generalized / Content-oriented / Health educator talks more © Zmwedical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights res
  14. 14. I3‘_i? ' iD zi-Kill. 0.2 U i“«'CEi. C2 5;; V 0 0 0 0 V, ’ C 0 > Creative and imaginative I _’I/ C/0,060,. I ' 0/ A /0 Of > Practical ~' 7/I/70.5/9/P . I V , U/ of/ CV K Si/ ,*GW > Shows respect for client S/ :00/759/0:: //7e ~33: T/7,-, O,£ O /9 CO0 XQ/ hf” . /7Q/ no/ //76 / Ice/ D O/ /on > o o CO/ D CCU” ‘Q £’Qm Acti o n-o ri ented “sagas _' S(? /0/ ,0/GD 5‘ / /e £Yom_ Orof/ .0 /0000” '7 ’ 9 9 > Doesn t impose own views or concerns ‘ 2,. V "H . ,1» . I If *”*+‘v’ I r ', , 2] © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. Ti-lii“«| GS Til if-‘E/ _if2 lD Moralizing Ill} pg Ordering I A Disagreeing Threatening . ‘ If Over-interpreting Arguing Sympathizing Judging © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  16. 16. SUMMARY > Counseling helps clients take charge of their lives. > Counseling can be provided to individuals, couples orfamilies. > An ideal counselor is creative and imaginative, has a practical approach, is able to show respect for clients, is action-oriented and does not impose his/ her own views or concerns. Counseling is different from health education. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. . . _ , . g . .-. W . - _- *4 . ‘x 1.‘ ~ I . - ‘ - g g _ _ - ‘ _ ‘ A -. - 7 . - -I . V - . - _ - ~ , - ‘ - - A , ‘ - - V. v". .. - . . . . — . . .4‘ I . - ' - - , , _ - . . . '_~ V . --_ - - _‘ . ‘ . .._, -_ . - , - . ,_ __ 'V _ . A . ‘ I ’ ‘ . .- T T- -_. i ' - . ~1' . v ~ l _ ‘ . _. .— ' _ . _ . . _ _ . - . _. _ - v . ._ g . . W ' . ’ _, -, ‘ ' _ *_ - " . _. J _ V - . x. ‘ * ~_ : . . - . . 1 . . . V . . . _.V » ‘ ‘ - ‘PL’- , ‘.4 (d 2013 Me-dica'| Wing-ofRajé3Loga_EdEication. &Research-Fourldatipn. ~AlFfiJitsi‘esejrved; , ' ; ' ~ _ ‘. V . ~ __
  18. 18. DRUG ADDICTION COUNSELING An intervention which gives the client an opportunity to explore his or her drug use and consequences confidentially, and to discuss available treatment options most appropriate to his/ her circumstances. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. Need of drug addiction counseling To encourage and motivate clients to reduce their drug use-related risks I / S82/3 To support clients in seeking care and support ii Drug users who fish ftfstop using drugs often benefit from counseling in combination with treatment options © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  20. 20. ROLE OF COUNSELING Counseling sessions help clients: > reduce risk or stop drug use > set goals and develop plans > develop problem solving and refusal skills > identify risky situations > identify ways to deal with risk © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. COMMUNICATION ATTRIBUTES Effective communication : - clear and non-judgmental - assists in building rapport - develops a sense of trust Effective communication is the key in: - undertaking a quality assessment - managing drug -related problems © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  22. 22. GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF COMMUNICATION > Develop rapport and a sense of trust > Attend to the person’s immediate concerns > Show concern about the client’s drug use problems without prejudice > USB EIPPTOPTIEIIB language IO OVBTCOITIB potential communication barriers © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  23. 23. Vs ‘i l nurturlna lovc caring e n1 [)8 thy lriiilltxtwono undcrqxafiiillnq co m mu nicest lo :1," © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved. gfiv . I31] I I" r ‘, ,fi , / . ‘ , ix ii” i l I . , l
  24. 24. EMPATHY Vs SYMPATHY Em pathize - Listen to and understand client's experience from his/ her perspective - Not always in agreement - Summarize and provide feedback - Help client find own solutions - Client's suffering is notyour burden © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  25. 25. EMPATHY VS SYMPATHY Sympathize - Always side with client - Emotionally involved - Experience as if burden is shared © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  26. 26. EMPATHY Vs SYMPATHY - Example Death of a Father If the friend uses sympathy, he/ she may say, ''I feel your pain. " If the friend uses empathy, he/ she may say, ''I feel your pain and also your great love for your father. " This sharing of the painful feelings of another person is characteristic of both sympathy and empathy. Sympathetic person pays more attention to the pain than to the love whereas empathetic person pays equal attention to pain and love. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  27. 27. EMPATHY Vs SYMPATHY © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  28. 28. SUMMARY Drug addiction counseling is - an intervention, confidential, provides options Role of drug addiction counseling - to encourage and motivate client to reduce risks associated with drug use - to support clients to seek care and support Effective communication - develops rapport, responds to immediate concerns - shows concern without prejudice - uses appropriate language Empathy works, sympathy doesn’t. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  29. 29. KEY PRINCIPLES IN DRUG ADDICTION COUNSELING > Voluntary > Confidential > Reliable > Non-judgmental > Respectful > Safe > Linked with other services © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  30. 30. 1. VOLUNTARY Support clients to make decisions on their own > Clients make decisions by themselves > Clients do not feel forced to do anything > Any breach will damage whatever trust has been built © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  31. 31. 2. CONFIDENTIALITY y . 1 RF}; , . Confidentiality must be assur(aT‘ '1'! /I - Client personal information kept confidential - Prevents reference to, or discussion about a client, except as professionally appropriate, and then only with cIient’s consent - Any breach of confidence will damage any trust that was built © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  32. 32. 3. RELIABILE > Express sincere empathy > Make clients feel they are being listened to and cared for > Provide accurate information and clear explanations > Demonstrate confidentiality © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  33. 33. 4. NON-JUDGEMENTAL > Always stay neutral, without reaction 9 Q ’ 9 > Counsel only after learning from clients experience > Obtain and maintain an understanding of clients’ perception of norms © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  34. 34. it , I E. F%. ESPECTFi. i'l. I ” J 9‘ El’ A r pl E6 I lii 111: i I -v . '—. —-—~. :<: -—». .( > Treat eveiy client the same > Respect clients as you expect others to respectyou > Mutual respect ensure effective communication and exchange © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  35. 35. 6. SAFE Safety is crucial for both counselors and clients. This includes the safety of the client, his/ her information, site property and physical environment. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  36. 36. 7. LINKED WITH OTHER SERVICES TB HIV Effective counseling is not limited to addressing drug use-related needs alone. Linkage with other services is key, especially HIV services, TB Care, Cancer Care etc.
  37. 37. I U Ni Ni F%. ‘i' A good understanding of, and adherence to, the 7 principles will enhance the client counselor relationship. The 7 principles are interlinked and are supportive of each other to ensure the success of counseling. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  38. 38. RECOLLECTING KEY PRINCIPLES. .. > Voluntaiy > Confidential > Reliable > Non-judgmental > Respectful > Safe > Linked with other services © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  39. 39. COUNSELING SKILLS © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  40. 40. TECHNIQUE & SKILL A technique is a way of efficiently accomplishing a task in an easy manner. A skill is an ability, usually / earned and acquired th rough training, to perform actions which achieve desired outcome(s). © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  41. 41. COUNSELING SKILLS El Attending El Self-efficacy El Open-ended questions El Affirmation El Paraphrasing El Reframing El Summarizing El Rolling with resistance El Reflective Listening El Interpreting El Probing D Confronting El Silence © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  42. 42. ATTENDING El Listen to verbal content El Observe non-verbal cues El Communicate Back (eg. ‘um-hm’, Iyes’) El Listen 90% of the time; talk 10% of the time © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  43. 43. ATTENDING Helps the client to: / feel relaxed and comfortable / express his/ her ideas and feelings freely / trust the counselor Helps the counselor to: / obtain accurate information about the client / notice non—verbal and physical cues © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  44. 44. OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS Helps the client to: V Keep the conversation going V To explore more deeply V To answer in multiple different ways Helps the counselor to: V get more information V see how a person thinks © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  45. 45. if-l i iii G (‘.2 ho it ii eff rig) Counselor gives a short briefing of what the client was telling. Helps the client to: V realize he/ she is understood properly V get a sense of direction for the flow of counseling Helps the counselor to: V summarize complicated information V spotlight an issue as important © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  46. 46. SUMMARIZING Provides an overview of what was discussed. Helps the client to: V order his/ her thinking V clarify meaning V realize he/ she is understood properly V have a sense of movement and progress Helps the counselor to: V ensure continuity of the session by providing focus V verify Counselor's perception of content V terminate session in a logical way V focus on one issue while acknowledging existence of other concerns © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  47. 47. REFLECTIVE LISTENING (REFLECTION OF FEELINGS) Can help link emotions to thoughts and behaviors. Helps the counselor to: V check whether he/ she accurately understands what the client is experiencing V bring out problem areas without pushing the client © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  48. 48. REFLECTIVE LISTENING (REFLECTION OF FEELINGS) Helps the client to: V realize the counselor understood what he/ she feels and experiences V bring to the surface feelings that may have been expressed vaguely V understand that emotions, thoughts and behaviors are connected © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  49. 49. REFLECTIVE LISTENING (REFLECTION OF FEELINGS) Examples of what you might say: Because of [ISSUE] you are feeling frustrated. Since you relapse frequently you think you don't have will power. Your parents’ attitude has made you more optimistic. You feel your family doesn't trust you and hence you feel sad. lfl understand correctly, you are saying that you used again because all your eorts not to use didn't make any dierence in the way others look at you. That made you feel [EMOTION] © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  50. 50. ERIE E: ii’JiE Asks for more information Clarification about a point that you think is important. Enables the counselor to: focus attention on areas that needs attention understand better what the client is describing Helps the client to: focus attention on a feeling or specific subject matter become aware of, and understand situation or feelings © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  51. 51. SILENCE V Can be very powerful V Can be a time when things really ‘sink in’ and feelings are recognized and felt strongly V When combined with attending cues, can serve to encourage the client to continue sharing V Allows the client to experience the power of his/ her own words © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  52. 52. SELF - EFFICACY Belief in clients’ ability to undertake tasks or fulfill their goals on their own For the client: V gives them confidence they are likely to succeed V provides them with energy and enthusiasm For the counselor: V should be promoted realistically © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  53. 53. AFFIRMATION Shows positive regard and support of clients’ efforts to change their behaviors For the client: V improves chances of se| f—efficacy V highly motivating © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  54. 54. F%. EFF%”, i‘. Nl om Provides a different meaning or interpretation of information For the client: V may give insights into behaviors V connects consequences they might not have considered For the counselor: V supports behavior change that the counselor is helping client to achieve © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  55. 55. ROLLING WITH RESISTANCE > Simple reflection > Amplified reflection > Doub| e—sided reflection © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  56. 56. INTERPRETING Critical: Use a non—confrontational opening to avoid your client's feeling judged by your interpretation Examples: ”The way I see. ..” ’’I wonder if. ..” © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  57. 57. INTERPRETING Consists of 3 components: V Determining and restating basic messages V Adding the counse| or’s ideas for a new frame of reference V Reflecting these ideas with clients © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  58. 58. INTERPRETING Helps the counselor to: V share a new perspective for the client to consider V offer new coping strategies to deal with issues Helps the client to: V realize there is more than one way to look at situations, problems and solutions V become more flexible and explore new points of view V understand the problem more clearly © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  59. 59. CONFRONTING Use when it is necessary to show client the difference between what they believe (or think) and what they actually do. Helps the counselor to: / establish him/ herself as a role model by using / direct, honest open communication Helps the client to: / break down defenses that the client has consciously or unconsciously put up / see the difference between what the client thinks and what the client does © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  60. 60. COMMON ROADBLOCKS TO EFFECTIVE COUNSELING Ordering or commanding Insincerity Warning or threatening Repetition Arguing or persuading Clichés Moralizing Jargon Ridiculing or labeling Collusion © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  61. 61. SUMMARY El Counseling skills are fundamental tools for drug addiction counseling El These skills are used with relapse prevention counseling techniques to form the foundation of effective drug addiction counseling © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  62. 62. COUNSELING TECHNIQUES > Problem solving > Goal setting > Time management > Stress management > Dealing with emotions - Anger etc. > Conflict resolution > Relapse prevention - Coping with cravings - Refusal skills © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  63. 63. PROBLEM SOLVING AND GOAL SETTING > The ability to solve problems is a characteristic of healthy living. > Many drug users have poor problem-solving skills. > Problem-solving skills factor into relapse risk. > Short-term goals based on specific problems: " help change appear more achievable " help a person experience success and counter feelings of helplessness " help increase self-confidence > Goals need to be clear, specific and matched to the client’s stage of change. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  64. 64. TIME MANAGEMENT Developing a daily schedule can: - help avoid allocating time for unhealthy behaviors - provide structure for the day and help prioritize activities - overcome boredom - help gain support from families and relatives © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  65. 65. STRESS MANAGEMENT Too much stress can impair performance: - Loss of motivation - Reduced effectiveness - Leads to physical, mental, and behavioral problems Teaching stress management techniques can reduce risk of relapse. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  66. 66. DEALING WITH EMOTIONS Anger, anxiety, depression etc. - common emotions among people with drug problems - can interfere with relationships - can precipitate drug relapse © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  67. 67. CONFLICT RESOLUTION Conflict is unavoidable in human relations. — Not knowing how to handle conflict in a healthy way can lead to major health and relationship problems - For drug users, it can also result in relapse © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  68. 68. F<‘. El. .’-‘FL? E P REE/ Ei”«"l‘li‘. '2 ill > Clients relapse due to a variety of internal or external factors > Relapse is common; clients will need to regain control to prevent further drug use Main interventions/ techniques: - Identify high-risk situations and develop coping responses - Learn to cope with cravings and develop skills to resist offers of drugs © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  69. 69. SUMMARY >CounseIing techniques can be used in avariety of ways and combinations (think of the list as a menu ofoptions). >Choice of counseling technique depends on individual client needs. >Not all techniques will be needed for every client >CIient needs may change over time. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  70. 70. DEVELOPING A COLLABORATION APPROACH Counselors must: > possess a thorough knowledge of addiction and normative patterns of drug use among the client group >acknowIedge that clients are the experts in discussing their own lives >convey to clients that their counselor serves as an ally © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  71. 71. DRUG ADDICTION COUNSELING PROCEDURES (Applied to drug users and recovering drug users) SUMMARY l PROBLEM SOLVING ACTION PLAN “ GOAL SETTING © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  72. 72. INTRODUCTION - Counseling Orientation > Self-introduction > Services introduction > Explain confidentiality > Time management for the counseling session > Explain reasons for collecting cIient’s information (for 1st time client), or explain the objectives of the session (for returning client) © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  73. 73. CLIENT ASSESSMENT O ’ O O O > Explore client s motivation to use the service > Explore demographic and psychosocial assessment information (1 st time client) > Assess drug use history including prior treatment > Evaluate (or re-evaluate) cIient’s problems (health, social, legal, nance, family, vocation etc. ) > Identify priorities, main topics of counseling session > Identify support resources for solving problems © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  74. 74. ONGOING CLIENT ASSESSMENT: > Status of client since last session > Any urgent problems that need attention and, if so, deal with them > Inquire use of drugs since last session If the client has used drugs: — Analyze the reason for relapse - Develop strategies to prevent future relapses — Discuss why abstaining from all drugs is important, particularly when one is attempting to recover from addiction © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  75. 75. PROBLEM SOLVING > Determine challenges > Specify problems > Brainstorm solutions > Decide appropriate solutions > Develop problem-solving pIan(s) © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  76. 76. GOAL SETTING The client sets up short-term SMART goals Specific Measurable Achievable Realistic Time-Bound © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  77. 77. ACTION PLAN > Determine strength of support resources > Integrate support services > Identify specific implementation steps to change behaviors or maintain positive behaviors © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  78. 78. PLAN REVISION Review the plan with the client Anticipate difficulties when implementing the plan Develop a coping plan for these difficulties © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  79. 79. SUMMARY Summarize topics and outcomes of the session Determine cIient’s confidence to implement the plan as agreed 0 O ’ O O 9 Determine client 5 commitment to plan implementation Confirm time for the next session Keep proper record © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  80. 80. COUNSELING TIPS > Useyour time wisely > Repeatedly remind the objectives of the counseling session (as needed) > Focus on most important and urgent probIem(s) > Respect cIient’s choices and decisions > Keep records of counseling session contents > Summarize the main points discussed > Set a time for the next counseling session © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  81. 81. MANAGING YOUR TIME DURING THE COUNSELING SESSION > Follow the procedures in the counseling session > Focus on the Client’s most important problem (s) > Link topics in order to segue into other appropriate topics > Stay focused and use summary skills when necessary © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  82. 82. MANAGING YOUR TIME DURING THE COUNSELING SESSION Combine: With! Counseling skills Counseling techniques - Open-ended questions - Problem solving - Affirmations - Goal - setting - Probing - Relapse prevention etc. - Interpreting - Summarizing etc. © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  83. 83. SUMMARY > Drug addiction counseling is a dynamic and circular process > Therapeutic alliance is crucial to the success of counseling > The counselor needs to guide the client through the process > Keep the process moving forward by summarizing, reviewing progress and setting new goals © 2013 Medical Wing of Rajayoga Education & Research Foundation. All rights reserved.
  84. 84. /‘ , ,, Farewell for a new beginning. ..

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