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A discussion of the various file formats for photographs and layouts including JPEG vs. TIFF vs. raw, PDF vs. native file formats, etc. Includes survey results of what schools and colleges are ...

A discussion of the various file formats for photographs and layouts including JPEG vs. TIFF vs. raw, PDF vs. native file formats, etc. Includes survey results of what schools and colleges are actually doing.

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CMYK etc CMYK etc Presentation Transcript

  • CMYK vs. RGB, JPEG vs TIFF, PDF vs. IDDBy Bradley Wilsonbradleywilson08@gmail.com©2013
  • Color modes• CMYK – cyan, magenta, yellow and black• Used in the printing process• For reflected light• A subtractive process• RGB – red, green and blue• Used when the output is a monitor (TV, computer screen, etc.)• For transmitted light• An additive process• Hexadecimal – red, green and blue• Simply a re-numeration of the RGB model• #ffffff = white, #ff0000 = red, #00ff00 = green, etc
  • Photo file formats• JPEG — Joint Photographic Experts Group• TIFF — Tagged Image File Format• EPS — Encapsulated PostScript• GIF — Graphic Interchange Format• PSD — Photoshop Document, the native format for Photoshop• Raw — raw, uncompressed data (not an acronym)
  • Other file formats• IDD — Adobe InDesign native format• PDF — (Adobe) Portable Document Format
  • JPEG vs. Rawhttp://www.photo.net/learn/raw/
  • JPEG vs. Raw• JPEG is faster• JPEG files are smaller• JPEG is a compression scheme (so is TIFF)• Raw files require post-exposure processing• Bob Atkins: “You lose nothing by shooting raw except for time andthe number of images you can fit on a memory card.”
  • Printing terms and formulas• LPI — lines per inch; the number of halftone lines in a publishedphoto (LPI=DPI * 10%)• DPI — dots per inch; the number of dots in an image formed by alaser printer or imagesetter (ex: 600dpi, 1200dpi)• PPI — pixels per inch; a pixel is the smallest component of a digitalimage (PPI=LPI*2)• So, if you’re printing in a newspaper at 85LPI thenthe PPI = 85LPI * 2 = 170PPI.• So, if you’re printing in a yearbook at 150LPI thenthe PPI = 150LPI * 2 = 300PPI.
  • So…• So, if the maximum data your printer can print is, say, 85LPI for thetypical newspaper, why capture information at greater than 170PPI?• 4”x6” photo• RGB, JPEG=12, 300ppi — 196KB• RGB, JPEG=12, 150ppi — 92KB• CMYK, JPEG=12, 300ppi — 788KB• RGB, TFF, 300ppi — 6.2MB
  • Scenario: Do you get it?• You take a picture with adigital camera. It comes inas a 17”x22” RGB JPEG fileright out of the camera at72PPI. (Incidentally, thisabout a 5MB file.)• What is the largest size itcan be used in theyearbook?• Turn OFF resampling inPhotoshop and type 300 inthe Resolution field.
  • Extension• Can you run that photo as adominant, 8”x10”? What are theramifications for doing so? An8”x10” photo at 300ppi wouldbe about a 21MB file.• Can you run it as a 2”x3”photo? What should you do?Why?• Notice that the finished result isa 1.79MB file.
  • How do you compare?• Pick one of your publications.• What file format do you submit pages to the printer?PDF. InDesign. PageMaker. QuarkXPress. Online only.• What file format do you save photos for use in thatpublication? PSD. JPEG. TIFF. EPS.• In what color mode do you save your color photos?RGB or CMYK.• At what resolution do you save your photos?72PPI. 85PPI. 130-170PPI. 266-300PPI.I have no idea. Other.
  • Newspapers: file format81%12%3%3%PDF IDDPM6 QXP86%5%9%PDFIDDPM6QXPOnline only94%5%1%PDF is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Yearbooks: file format43%47%8%2%PDF IDDPM6 QXP47%26%1%25%PDFIDDPM6QXPOnlinePDF is thebest answer43%34%23%PDF IDDPM6 QXPOnlineSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Newspapers: photo format9%36%48%6%PSD JPEGTIFF EPS1%66%30%1%1%PSDJPEGTIFFEPSPDF4%54%36%3%2%PSD JPEGTIFF EPSPDFJPEG is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Yearbooks: photo format6%50%38%6%PSD JPEGTIFF EPS2%82%15% 1%PSDJPEGTIFFEPS8%66%25% 2%PSD JPEGTIFF EPSPSDJPEG is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Newspapers: resolution4% 6%42%48%72 85130-170 266-30010%1%25%64%7285130-170266-3002%37%61%72 85130-170 266-300170ppi is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Yearbooks: resolution5%95%72130-170266-3001%2%96%72130-170266-3002%3%95%72130-170266-300300ppi is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Newspapers: color mode7%93%RGB CMYK18%82%RGBCMYK21%79%RGB CMYKRGB is thebest answerSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • Yearbooks: color mode21%79%RGBCMYK45%55%RGBCMYK45%55%RGBCMYKRGB is thebest answer*SOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers
  • From designer Mike WilliamsMost designers think if they are designing FOR print they should useCMYK, or FOR screen use RGB.Instead, they should be thinking if they are looking at color ONscreen use RGB, and if they are checking color ON a print useCMYK. While working on a screen keep the colors RGB and beforesending the files to proof and print convert to CMYK.You just cannot trust CMYK colors on a screen. Period.
  • From designer Andrew Kelsall• RGB files are about 25 percent smallerthan CMYK.• Many filters and functions are onlyavailable to use in an RGB color mode inAdobe Photoshop and similar programs.• The RGB color gamut is larger thanCMYK• Working in RGB means that the imagesare Web-ready with no color conversion(as opposed to designing for print inCMYK and converting the color to RGBfor web-use).
  • What do the companies recommend?JPEGCMYK300ppiJPEG, TIFF, PSDRGB, CMYK300 ppi“We will convert files to CMYK so anyone thatwant to see if there is a slight color shift withtheir images should convert before supplyingto us.” • Paul FriesenRGB“Our pre-press admin system managesthem to CMYK” • Mike CobbJPG, TIFF or PNG (no PSD)300ppiRGB“The Prinergy process in the plant, the finalstep before plates are made, converts toCMYK using our profiles to get the best colorpossible.” • Gary LundgrenJPG300ppi
  • Who prints the yearbook?22%31%3%15%21% 8%Herff Jones JostensLifetouch TaylorWalsworth Other25%31%19%13%12%1%Herff JonesJostensLifetouchBalfourWalsworthOtherFriesensSOURCE: Spring 2006 survey of 124 advisersand spring 2009 survey of 138 advisersand spring 2013 survey of 160 advisers25%33%19%17% 5%2%Herff Jones JostensLifetouch TaylorWalsworth OtherFriesens
  • Conclusions. Thoughts.• Always do what your printer tells you.• For native InDesign files, it seems as though CMYK, JPEG is thepreferred format for newspapers but for only about half ofyearbooks. Change to JPEG from TIFF is significant. RGB is gainingground. For PDF files, JPEG, CMYK leads in both media.• Still have to ship fonts and linked files with native files. Missing linksalone result in about a 23 percent error rate.• Vast majority of newspapers submit their pages as PDF files. Whynot yearbooks?• Move to online submission of yearbook pages (usually a form ofPDF) and online-only newspapers is significant.
  • Contact meBy Bradley Wilson, PhDbradleywilson08@gmail.combradleywilsononline.net • Twitter: bradleywilson09©2013