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  • THE SILENT FEATURE By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D. bradleywilson08@gmail.com ©2014 ! Photos remain copyrighted 
 by the original photographers.
  • Spring forward Remember to set your clocks one hour ahead. SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 SERVING THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY SINCE 1909 75 CENTS DAILY Bieber fever culminates at concert By Karen Antonacci and Elizabeth Findell The Monitor HIDALGO — As the open- ing act took the stage Saturday night at State Farm Arena, a group of young girls waited at the back exit, hoping to catch a glimpse of someone not even scheduled to perform. Four Fossum Middle School seventh-graders screamed at the mere mention of Justin Bieber’s name. They said they could not get into Saturday night’s Selena Go- mez concert, as it had been sold out for weeks. No matter. They had other business to attend to Saturday night. “Being a Belieber, following him is like our job,” said Caro- lina Villarreal, 13. “We follow him, even through all the nega- tive press, his Beliebers are here.” For those of you who, like, don’t know (and you totally should), “Belieber” is what the Canadian superstar’s diehard fans call themselves. Hype about Gomez’s concert — the second time she’s taken the stage at State Farm Arena — ex- ploded Friday when word spread of Bieber’s unannounced arrival Activists question useof drainage money By Jacob Fischler The Monitor EDINBURG — In a time of increased public scrutiny of Hidalgo County’s drain- age district, some activists are complaining Precinct 3 has been keeping the blinds closed on its finances. In a period over the past fewweekswhentheHidalgo County Drainage Board has sought to increase trans- parency on the process of spending the $185 million county voters approved in two recent bond elections, about $1.4 million in money allocated for colonia drain- age projects in Precinct 3 remained unaccounted for until Friday. Drainage district manag- ers passed out documents at a citizen’s advisory board meeting last month that broke down some of the spending and provided sta- tus updates on the related projects. Although the pa- perwork showed Precinct 3 Commissioner Joe Flores’ officehascommittedalmost $2 million — more than any other precinct — for ru- ral drainage development projects, no projects from that precinct appeared on another document outlin- ing the status of all the other rural drainage projects. In a Friday letter to County Judge Ramon Gar- cia, Flores said the total is closer to $1.4 million. The county’s public relations office also forwarded to The Monitor a list of 12 colonias impacted by drainage work under way in the La Joya Watershed in Precinct 3. But constituents and commu- nity activists have had more trouble getting access to that information. Wikileaks founder talksat Austin festival By Barbara Ortutay The Associated Press AUSTIN — Speaking over Skype from the Ecuadorian embassy in London, fugi- tive WikiLeaks founder Ju- lian Assange said his living situation is a bit like pris- on — with a more lenient visitor policy. He also hinted that new leaks are coming from WikiLeaks, though he gave no specifics on what these might be. Assange, who has been confined to the embassy since June 2012, discussed government surveillance, journalism and the situation in Ukraine on Saturday in a streaming-video interview beamed to an audience of 3,500 attendees of the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin. Assange’s hourlong re- moteappearancewasspiked with technical glitches. As the audio cut out, he some- times asked audience mem- bers to raise their hands if they could hear him. See ASSANGE | 12A See MONEY | 12A See STARS | 12A Julian Assange hints at more releases while appearing via Skype About $1.4M in funds for Precinct 3 colonia projects are unaccounted for A girl and her pigAbove, Karina Vela gets a hug and kiss from her father, J.J.Vela, after placing third in the STAR Show Feb. 27 at Edinburg Municipal Park. At left, Sophie looks up at Karina during feeding time Feb. 27 at the Ag Farm in Edinburg. Photos by Delcia Lopez | dlopez@ themonitor.com By Elizabeth Findell | The Monitor I n jeans, sweatshirts and spangled belts, the teenagers lined up against the Edinburg stock show grounds rail last month, laughing and talking with friends, snapping photos, a few crying, and all scanning anxiously for their own charges. The emotion intensified as the pigs were herded down the aisle, hopping and squeal- ing. Karina Vela, 16, clustered with her friends Priscilla Zarate and Yulissa Cabello, joking with other friends nearby. See COMPETITION | 14A When youths raise competition livestock, emotions run high Barbara Ortutay | The AP Fugitive Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks Saturday via Skype at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin. There is more than $129 in savings via coupons in today’s issue of ‘The Monitor.’ INSIDE SMART AVINGS$ Assange Pop star Selena Gomez sings Saturday in a show at BorderFest at State Farm Arena in Hidalgo. Joel Martinez | jmartinez@ themonitor. com Selena Gomez performs Saturday at BorderFest; star sightings continue Bieber
  • By Jacob Fischler The Monitor EDINBURG — In a time of increased public scrutiny of Hidalgo County’s drain- age district, some activists are complaining Precinct 3 has been keeping the blinds closed on its finances. In a period over the past fewweekswhentheHidalgo County Drainage Board has sought to increase trans- parency on the process of spending the $185 million county voters approved in two recent bond elections, about $1.4 million in money allocated for colonia drain- age projects in Precinct 3 remained unaccounted for until Friday. Drainage district manag- ers passed out documents at a citizen’s advisory board meeting last month that broke down some of the spending and provided sta- tus updates on the related projects. Although the pa- perwork showed Precinct 3 Commissioner Joe Flores’ officehascommittedalmost $2 million — more than any other precinct — for ru- ral drainage development projects, no projects from that precinct appeared on another document outlin- ing the status of all the other rural drainage projects. In a Friday letter to County Judge Ramon Gar- cia, Flores said the total is closer to $1.4 million. The county’s public relations office also forwarded to The Monitor a list of 12 colonias impacted by drainage work under way in the La Joya Watershed in Precinct 3. But constituents and commu- nity activists have had more trouble getting access to that information. By Barbara Ortutay The Associated Press AUSTIN — Speaking over Skype from the Ecuadorian embassy in London, fugi- tive WikiLeaks founder Ju- lian Assange said his living situation is a bit like pris- on — with a more lenient visitor policy. He also hinted that new leaks are coming from WikiLeaks, though he gave no specifics on what these might be. Assange, who has been confined to the embassy since June 2012, discussed government surveillance, journalism and the situation in Ukraine on Saturday in a streaming-video interview beamed to an audience of 3,500 attendees of the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin. Assange’s hourlong re- moteappearancewasspiked with technical glitches. As the audio cut out, he some- times asked audience mem- bers to raise their hands if they could hear him. See ASSANGE | 12A See MONEY | 12A releases while appearing via Skype funds for Precinct 3 colonia projects are unaccounted for A girl and her pigAbove, Karina Vela gets a hug and kiss from her father, J.J.Vela, after placing third in the STAR Show Feb. 27 at Edinburg Municipal Park. At left, Sophie looks up at Karina during feeding time Feb. 27 at the Ag Farm in Edinburg. Photos by Delcia Lopez | dlopez@ themonitor.com By Elizabeth Findell | The Monitor I n jeans, sweatshirts and spangled belts, the teenagers lined up against the Edinburg stock show grounds rail last month, laughing and talking with friends, snapping photos, a few crying, and all scanning anxiously for their own charges. The emotion intensified as the pigs were herded down the aisle, hopping and squeal- ing. Karina Vela, 16, clustered with her friends Priscilla Zarate and Yulissa Cabello, joking with other friends nearby. See COMPETITION | 14A When youths raise competition livestock, emotions run high Barbara Ortutay | The AP Fugitive Wikileaks founder Julian Assange speaks Saturday via Skype at the South By Southwest Interactive festival in Austin. Assange
  • www.BeaumontEnterprise.com SUNDAY, MARCH 9, 2014 $2.00 ENTERPRISE BEAUMONT 65/45 30% showers BE......................1B Classified ...........6D Need to Know..... 4A Obituaries........... 6A Opinions........... 19A Puzzles...............2B Real Estate.........1C TV......................2B YourSports..........1D YourWorld ........... 8A Vol. CXXXIV, No. 124 Section designed and copy edited by Vic Odegar and Christopher Clausen,VOdegar@BeaumontEnterprise.com A fter his legs carried him 51 miles in a little over four hours, Seth Cooke just wanted to take off his clothes. He did not want a bite to eat. Or something to drink. Or a blow of oxygen. The Tyler native wasn’t even thinking about his medals. Instead, after winning the Gusher Marathon and then medaling in the event-first Heads or Tails Cycling Time Trials on Saturday, Cooke bypassed the finish line and kept going — all the way to his white Toyota Yaris in the Montagne Center parking lot to get out of his spandex. GUSHER, page 12A The burning question from the Tex- as Education Agency’s flame-throwing report of the Beaumont school district’s litany of failures in gover- nance and administration is whether the board of trustees and possibly the superintendent will be swept aside in favor of state-appointed managers. The preliminary investigation re- port, released late last week, details the district’s failures to detect fraud, waste and abuse and protect the BEAUMONT BISD, page 9A BEAUMONT Marathon, half marathon and 5K results: 16-18A And now for Boston: 1D Tyler native Seth Cooke crosses the finish line first in the Gusher Marathon on Saturday in Beaumont. Cooke later placed third in the 40K Heads or Tails Cycling Time Trials. Buy photos of the big event: BeaumontEnterprise.com .com View more Gusher photos: 13A and 18A and Beaumont Enterprise.com/photos Robert McCallum, left, helps Logan Sofjan with his numbers before the cycling time trials. Photos by Jake Daniels/@JakeD_in_SETX and Guiseppe Barranco/@spotnewsshooter Saturday’s competitions in Beau- mont included a marathon, half marathon, 5K run and — new this year — cycling time trials.
  • Need to Know..... 4A Real Estate.........1C A fter his legs carried him 51 miles in a little over four hours, Seth Cooke just wanted to take off his clothes. He did not want a bite to eat. Or something to drink. Or a blow of oxygen. The Tyler native wasn’t even thinking about his medals. Instead, after winning the Gusher Marathon and then medaling in the event-first Heads or Tails Cycling Time Trials on Saturday, Cooke bypassed the finish line and kept going — all the way to his white Toyota Yaris in the Montagne Center parking lot to get out of his spandex. GUSHER, page 12A The burning question from the Tex- as Education Agency’s flame-throwing report of the Beaumont school district’s litany of failures in gover- nance and administration is whether the board of trustees and possibly the superintendent will be swept aside in favor of state-appointed managers. The preliminary investigation re- port, released late last week, details the district’s failures to detect fraud, waste and abuse and protect the BEAUMONT BISD, page 9A BEAUMONT Marathon, half marathon and 5K results: 16-18A And now for Boston: 1D Tyler native Seth Cooke crosses the finish line first in the Gusher Marathon on Saturday in Beaumont. Cooke later placed third in the 40K Heads or Tails Cycling Time Trials. Buy photos of the big event: BeaumontEnterprise.com .com View more Gusher photos: 13A and 18A and Beaumont Enterprise.com/photos Robert McCallum, left, helps Logan Sofjan with his numbers before the cycling time trials. Photos by Jake Daniels/@JakeD_in_SETX and Guiseppe Barranco/@spotnewsshooter Saturday’s competitions in Beau- mont included a marathon, half marathon, 5K run and — new this year — cycling time trials.
  • It’s your job • Photojournalism is more than just snapping pictures. 
 That’s for amateurs. • Photojournalists are ‘paid’ to report. 
 Photographers are not. Photojournalism is more than just snapping pictures. That’s for amateurs. When on assignment, it is as important to gather written notes about a scene, including information from the people in the photo, as it is to capture the visual image. Caption information is vital, and without it a photo will not be published.
  • Photo by Pete Ellis
  • JASON IVESTER
  • Have a notepad and pen Well, first and foremost, as obvious as this sounds, EVERY photojournalist should have a notepad 
 and a pen with them. Jason Ivester, photojournalist, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
  • A student crowd surfs during the Avett Brothers' performance at Pack Howl. Photo by Aria Behrouzi
  • SURFING Eli Tiller, a senior in biochemistry, crowd surfs during The Avett Brothers’ performance at Pack Howl. “I have crowd surfed before, but the crowd surfing in Reynolds was the best I’ve ever done,” Tiller said. “Everyone was tossing me back and forth like the first place hot potato at the State Fair. It seemed like I was up there for a couple of hours.” Photo by Aria Behrouzi
  • Julio Aparicio, one of Spain's most famous matadors, was gored in the throat May 22, 2010 during a bullfight. The injury left him in critical condition. “[The horn] went through the tongue and penetrated the roof of the mouth, fracturing the jawbone,” one of the medics who worked on Aparicio told AFP news in Madrid. After two operations, surgeon Maximo Garcia Pedros saved Aparicio's life. Other matadors, however, quickly killed the bull. The incident took place during the Festival of Saint Isidro, considered to be the most important event in the bullfighting calendar, at the Plaza de Toros las Ventas bullring, which can seat up to 24,000 people.
  • ROUND ONE: BULL Julio Aparicio, one of Spain's most famous matadors, was gored in the throat May 22, 2010 during a bullfight. The injury left him in critical condition. “[The horn] went through the tongue and penetrated the roof of the mouth, fracturing the jawbone,” one of the medics who worked on Aparicio told AFP news in Madrid. After two operations, surgeon Maximo Garcia Pedros saved Aparicio's life. Other matadors, however, quickly killed the bull. The incident took place during the Festival of Saint Isidro, considered to be the most important event in the bullfighting calendar, at the Plaza de Toros las Ventas bullring, which can seat up to 24,000 people.
  • Parts of caption A good caption has four parts: • a headline, • an identification sentence, • a secondary information sentence, • a quote.
  • Headline The headline should be a clever title verbally linked to the photograph. A pun works well here when appropriate.
  • What might be a good headline for this image of a student at the U.S. Naval Academy crowd-surfing at a football game?
  • Identification The identification sentence explains exactly 
 what is going on in the photo, names all visible people and is written in present tense. Avoid beginning with a name 
 and don’t overuse gerund phrases.
  • Identification In short, the first sentence in a caption 
 at least answers the questions who what when where
  • A NEW STAR N.C. State Men's Tennis freshman David Chermak poses for a photo outside the J.W. Isenhour Tennis Center. Chermak joins the Wolfpack's team after an impressive record at Sanderson High School, where he went 88-10 in his singles career. At State, Chermak is 7-6 in singles play and 2-5 in doubles play with fellow teammate Derek Stephens. Photo by John Cosgrove
  • A NEW STAR Freshman David Chermak joined the team after going 88-10 in his singles career at Sanderson High School. Chermak is now 7-6 in singles play and 2-5 in doubles play with teammate Derek Stephens. Photo by John Cosgrove
  • Who would you talk to 
 and what questions would you ask?
  • Ask questions As for the second or more sentences, 
 the photographer should ask reporter-style questions to find more information 
 that isn’t quite obvious. Jason Ivester, photojournalist, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
  • Secondary The secondary information sentence… ADDS INFORMATION that is not obvious in the photo 
 and is written in past tense. Includes information from the interview. Maybe answers the questions why and how.
  • HOWL Jenny Randol, a freshman in industrial engineering, and Josh Fisher, a freshman in biochemistry, enjoy themselves during Playfair at Convocation in the RBC Center on Monday. Photo by Dreier Carr.
  • Who would you talk to 
 and what questions would you ask?
  • Quotation A quote at the end adds the feeling of being there. 
 Use feelings and opinion in quotes. Don’t just quote facts.
  • Get quotations It doesn’t hurt to get quotes while on assignment. 
 There’s nothing wrong with putting a good quote in a cutline. Jason Ivester, photojournalist, Arkansas Democrat-Gazette
  • AUSTIN DOWD
  • Get quotations A photo without a caption is like a movie without sound. Austin Dowd
  • Shimmying out of the water, Tim Scranton, a sophomore in middle school math education, makes his way out of the 39-degree water of Lake Raleigh during the 2008 Polar Plunge. Scranton plunged as a part of the Sadlack's Heroes team who raised between $450 and $500 for the event. Rose Schwetz, the owner of Sadlack's Heroes and winner of the Oldest Polar Plunger award, put up the first $250 and the rest came from tip jars for customers and whoever else to add to. Scranton has volunteered for the Special Olympics off and on for the past 10 years and helped out at the Summer World games when they were held in Raleigh. "We just thought it was a great cause, Special Olympics is a worthy cause and always needing more support," Scranton said, "Whatever we could do we were more than happy to do it." Photo by Logan Smith.
  • COLD WATER Shimmying out of the water, Tim Scranton, a sophomore in middle school math education, makes his way out of the 39-degree water of Lake Raleigh during the 2008 Polar Plunge. Scranton plunged as a part of the Sadlack's Heroes team that raised between $450 and $500 for the event. Rose Schwetz, owner of Sadlack's Heroes and winner of the Oldest Polar Plunger award, put up the first $250 and the rest came from customer tip jars. Scranton has volunteered for the Special Olympics off and on for the past 10 years and helped out at the Summer World games when they were held in Raleigh. “We just thought it was a great cause, Special Olympics is a worthy cause and is always needing more support,” Scranton said, “Whatever we could do, we were more than happy to do it.” Photo by Logan Smith.
  • Final thought Without a doubt, the captions are 
 the most-often-read copy in any publication. Make them worth reading.
  • By Bradley Wilson, PhD Midwestern State University bradley.wilson@mwsu.edu bradleywilson08@gmail.com Twitter: @bradleywilson09 The End M UP IN FLAMES u Chemical changes and physical changes such as the one Trey Grubb watches in chemistry class were an ordinary part of the new science
  • 

curriculum.
  • 

“Sometimes
  • 

the
  • 

flames
  • 

went
  • 

 up about three feet causing the heat to somewhat ‘singe’ the ceiling,” said freshman Mike Payne. Photo by Cameron Livingston. Looking at a picture without a caption is like watching televi- sion with the sound turned off. captions y yearbook editor brought me a great re- action photograph to use on a division page. I remembered the moment in the photo and didn’t want to include it in the book even though it was up close and in focus. The photo showed a girl who was the last to be named to our homecoming court. Whoopee. Her name was the last called at the end of the pep rally, and she tumbled down the bleachers squealing in front of the entire student body. Finally she made it to the gym floor where she collapsed into the arms of her best friend. I had never seen a more ridicu- lous display in my entire life; furthermore, I thought this child seriously needed to get a life if being on homecoming court made her this happy. My editor countered that this was a great photo. I argued that we shouldn’t encourage this type of reaction by rewarding it with a dominant photograph on the division page. It was up to her, but I would never use it. Period. As a rule, we included a quote in each cap- tion in the yearbook. So the editor, Glenda, interviewed the girl, Krista, thinking a quote better than “I can’t believe they called my name,” would persuade me to bestow my blessing upon her using the photo. A GREAT STORY Glenda interviewed Krista at length and found a wonderful story, a story no one would have known without an in-depth caption. Krista’s last name began with a “W,” and by some goof from the office, the names were called out alphabetically though few had real- ized it. Fourteen other girls made the court; only one spot remained. The world was grow- ing dim for Krista as each slot passed by. Neither popularity, a chance for queendom, nor a new suit, none of these things, had been the motivation for Krista’s excitement. Krista had five older sisters who had attended the same school, and all five had been members of the homecoming court. Krista, the youngest, didn’t want to be the only one in her family not to make the court. She couldn’t recall exactly what had hap- pened that afternoon, she just remembered the rush of relief she felt when she heard her name. A great story would have been lost had an obstinate adviser had her way. It became the dominant photo on the spread. Glenda was right. BY LORI OGLESBEE LAYOUT AND DESIGN BY ADAM FORTNER AND BRADLEY WILSON