All I Need to Know About Journalism
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All I Need to Know About Journalism

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A keynote address for the Virginia Association of Journalism Teachers and Advisers, spring 2014.

A keynote address for the Virginia Association of Journalism Teachers and Advisers, spring 2014.

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All I Need to Know About Journalism All I Need to Know About Journalism Presentation Transcript

  • By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D. bradleywilson08@gmail.com bradleywilsononline.net @bradleywilson09 #jdayinva2014
  • By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D. Midwestern State University bradleywilson08@gmail.com
  • All I really need to know I learned in journalism Make every word count. Keep it simple. Provide context. Lead with the good stuff. Write killer headlines. People make things interesting. Headlines “sell.” Graphics expand the story. Consider the reader. Teamwork counts. Presentation matters. Readers notice inconsistencies. A pica is a perfectly legitimate unit of measurement. If you bend a pica pole back too far it will recoil and hit you in the face. The soundbite is powerful. When you’re getting ready to give a long-winded explanation or commentary, stop and think that all of that can be mentally edited down to 10 seconds or less. Being clear and concise helps others understand me. Working as a team makes the job easier....AND more fun. Knowing the audience helps to tell a story that will mean something to them. Being transparent ensures people will believe me. Following the law keeps me out of trouble. Applying ethics means I think about what I SHOULD do. Never use the word really. Really. Accuracy matters. Everyone works better with snacks at hand. There is always another side to any story. Learn how to write a sentence. Stand up in the face of “power.” Think critically. Always tell the truth. Check, recheck (and check it again) to make sure it is correct. Place the most important things at the front (of your life). Never ass-u-me. If you’re being shot at, cars really do go just as fast in reverse, despite everything your mother, father, brother or mechanic told you. Truth is more important than anything. Consider the source. Never ask a question that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.” Late is a nasty word. What happens in the newsroom stays in the newsroom. Never unplug the refrigerator overnight. Everyone makes mistakes. Our mistakes affect other people. There is always room for improvement. Symmetry is over-rated; give me the rule of thirds any day. A fussy picture doesn’t get clearer simply by publishing it. Never let someone tell you what you can or cannot say. Everything goes better with a little bit of pizza! Contributors JOHN McBRIDE, Ford Dodge (Iowa) Senior High, jmcbride@fort-dodge.k12.ia.us SUSAN HOUSEMAN, Conestoga High School (Berwyn, Penn.), HousemanS@tesd.net CANDACE PERKINS BOWEN, Kent (Ohio) State University, cbowen@kent.edu KATIE WRIGHT, Crete (Nebr.) High School, Katiew@creteschools.org BETH SHULL, Arkansas Scholastic Press Association, bshull29@gmail.com MARY STAPP, Wilson High School (Washington, D.C.), marystapp@aol.com SCOTT CLAY, Clay.Scott@volstate.edu SUSANNAH NESMITH, susannahnesmith@yahoo.com CONI GREBEL, Lee County High School (Leesburg, Ga.), conigreb@bellsouth.net. ©2010 JOURNALISM EDUCATION ASSOCIATION. Design by Bradley Wilson. From Communication: Journalism Education Today of the Journalism Education Association
  • explanation or comme and think that all of that can be mentally edited down to 10 seconds or less. Being clear and concise helps others understand me. Working as a team makes the job easier....AND more un. Knowing the audience helps to tell a story that will mean something to them. Being transparent ensures people will believe me. Following the law keeps me out of trouble. Applying ethics means I think about what I SHOULD do. Never use the word really. Really. Accuracy matters. Everyone works better with snacks at hand. There is always another side to any story. Learn how to write a sentence Stand up in the face of “power.” Think critically. Always tell the truth. Check recheck (and check it again) to make sure it is correct. Place the most importan things at the front (of your life). Never ass-u-me. If you’re being shot at, car really do go just as fast in reverse, despite everything your mother, father, brothe or mechanic told you. Truth is more important than anything. Consider th source. Never ask a question that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no Late is a nasty word. What happens in the newsroom stays in the newsroom Never unplug the refrigerator overnight. Everyone makes mistakes. O mistakes affect other people. There is always room for improvement. Symmet is over-rated; give me the rule of thirds any day. A fussy picture doesn’t get clear simply by publishing it. Never let someone tell you what you can or cannot s with a little bit of pizza!
  • Applying ethics means I think about what I SHOULD do.
  • SCOTT STRAZZANTE Chicago Tribune http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/shooting-from-the-hip/
  • As I edited my take after the game, 
 I noticed, that during Brunson's reaction, there were a handful of frames where only his middle fingers were extended. SCOTT STRAZZANTE Chicago Tribune http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/shooting-from-the-hip/
  • A photographer from the Peoria newspaper decided to send his version of the image and it was published online with the caption— “Jalen Brunson of Lincolnshire Stevenson makes a gesture to the Chicago Whitney Young crowd.”
  • Seeing the play happen through my viewfinder, I was very confident that the gesture was not intentional. SCOTT STRAZZANTE Chicago Tribune http://newsblogs.chicagotribune.com/shooting-from-the-hip/
  • Ethics exists on so many levels. And our credibility is at stake at every level.
  • @darrenrovell cup of the day? At Temple vs ND pic.twitter.com/ mHhd0VKcBs 2:12 PM - 31 Aug 2013 SPELL CHECK
  • PROOF FOR CONTENT
  • PROOF FOR CONTENT
  • POST ON WALL
  • DESIGN
  • DESIGN
  • STEP BACK AND LOOK AT THE BIG PICTURE
  • IS IT RIGHT?
  • The Post: 12 people had died The truth: two or, at the most, three The Post: Saudi national taken into custody by police The truth: no suspect and nobody in custody
  • IS IT THE RIGHT THING TO DO?
  • Is it better to be first or accurate?
  • TIMELINE Scene ReactionLogo AftermathVictims Suspect
  • Reporters are no better than their sources. PAUL FARHI Washington Post http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/news-outlets-often- stumble-in-quest-for-speed-and-accuracy/2013/09/16/ e5444820-1f19-11e3-8459-657e0c72fec8_story.html
  • People on Twitter take it for granted that scanner chatter is real and confirmed. It’s not. Reporting on such preliminary data, without official confirmation, is asking for trouble. MARK E. BRADY Public Information Officer Prince George County Fire and EMS
  • March 7, 2014
  • March 24
  • April 2,2014
  • We’ve gotten into a situation where the media’s standard operating procedure has become report first, confirm second and correct third. DAVE STATTER Former reporter, WUSA-TV Publisher, STATter911.com
  • In our haste to compete 
 with social media 
 to cover breaking news, 
 we’ve forgotten that 
 what makes us special 
 is our skill 
 in confirming information, 
 not just reporting it. DAVE STATTER Former reporter, WUSA-TV Publisher, STATter911.com
  • You don’t know what you’re getting with half the stuff on the internet. Too many people have access to that delivery system. They have no training. They sit around in their bathrobes and spit out information. DAN THOMASSON Syndicated columnist Speaking at Midwestern State University April 2, 2014
  • Make sure your reporting 
 is as accurate as it can be. 
 If you get beaten then you get beaten. DAN THOMASSON Syndicated columnist Speaking at Midwestern State University April 2, 2014
  • The majority of students tended to list honesty as the best guidelines for ethics…. While specific ethics changes from professional profession, the foundation does not. BEN BRINK Photojournalist
  • BEN BRINK Photojournalist The foundation is basic, simple honesty, the kind you learn in kindergarten. Don’t tell us stories about things that didn’t happen. Don’t show us things that don’t exist.
  • #jdayinva2014
  • By Bradley Wilson, Ph.D. bradleywilson08@gmail.com bradleywilsononline.net @bradleywilson09 PHOTO BY KEVIN NIBUR