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Prostate Health

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One of the keys to a man's health is the health of his prostate. Learn about common symptoms and natural solutions.

One of the keys to a man's health is the health of his prostate. Learn about common symptoms and natural solutions.

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  • 1. Prostate Health Bernard Rosen, PhD
  • 2. Bernard Rosen
    • PhD in Nutrition (Clayton College)
    • MBA (Northwestern University)
    • B.S. (University of Pennsylvania)
    • Corporate Experience – Norlight Telecommunications, Kohler Company, J.I.Case, United Airlines
    • I used to weigh 185 pounds!
  • 3. Prostate Health
    • Prostate – anatomy and physiology
    • Common disorders
    • Conventional treatments
    • Prevention
  • 4. The Prostate
  • 5. Anatomy
    • Part of male reproductive system.
    • Located just under the bladder.
    • Surrounds the urethra and the ejaculatory duct.
      • Urethra – transports urine from the bladder and ejaculates semen.
    • Walnut size in young men.
    • Merck Manual - “Enlarges with age.”
  • 6. Physiology
    • Growth and functioning of the prostate are controlled by testosterone.
    • It protects the genitourinary system from infection.
    • Filters out the impurities in blood stream so that seminal fluid is healthy place for sperm cells.
  • 7. Physiology
    • Acts as a valve that permits both sperm and urine to flow in the proper direction.
    • It receives sperm from the testicles, produces nutrients to nourish the sperm, and assists in the passage of the sperm.
    • As it does all this, it removes toxins and metabolic wastes from the blood.
    • Question: Where does this stuff go?
  • 8. Prostate Disorders
    • Prostatitis
    • Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BHP)
    • Prostate Cancer
  • 9. Statistics
    • By the age of 50 – 75% of men have enlarged prostates.
    • By the age of 50 – 33% of men have cancer cells in their prostates.
    • By the age of 75 – 75% have cancer cells in their prostates.
  • 10. Prostatitis
    • Pain and swelling of the prostate gland.
    • Merck Manual – “Prostatitis usually develops for unknown reasons.”
    • Can result from a bacterial infection.
    • Most times is “non-bacterial” = unknown origin.
    • Toxins and wastes can accumulate over time -> why more prevalent in older men.
    • Generally in men under age 50.
  • 11. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • A noncancerous (benign) enlargement of the prostate gland that can make urination difficult.
    • Merck Manual – “Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BHP) becomes increasingly common as men age, especially after age 50. The precise cause is not known but probably involves changes induced by hormones, especially testosterone.
  • 12. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • Statistics:
      • By age 50 – 30% of males begin to experience BPH
      • By age 60 – 50%.
      • Beyond 70 – 80%.
      • By age 80 – virtually 100%.
      • 20% of men with BPH will develop prostate cancer.
  • 13. Male Hormones
    • Note that men and women have similar hormones.
      • DHEA
      • Progesterone
      • Androstenedione
      • Estrogen
      • Testosterone
      • Dihydrotestosterone (DHT)
  • 14. Hormone Basics
    • Powerful biological chemicals produced by the endocrine glands in very small amounts.
    • Endocrine glands – hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid, adrenal, ovaries, testes.
    • Released into the blood stream and carried to cells of the body.
    • Hormones initiate cell actions as wells as help regulate, control, and coordinate body functions.
  • 15. Hormone Manufacturing
    • It starts with Cholesterol.
    • Cholesterol makes Pregnenolone.
    • Pregnenolone makes DHEA or Progesterone.
    • DHEA and Progesterone can make Androstenedione.
    • Progesterone also makes Aldosterone and 17-hydroxyprogesterone (which makes Cortisol).
  • 16. Hormone Manufacturing
    • Androstenedione makes Testosterone and Estrone (E1). Testosterone can also be converted back to Androstenedione.
    • Testosterone can make DHT or Estradiol (E2).
    • Estrone (E1) makes Estriol (E3) and Estradiol (E2). Estradiol can also be converted back to Estrone (E1).
  • 17. Testosterone
    • The main male and androgen hormone, produced in the testes. A steroid, anabolic, body building hormone.
  • 18. What Testosterone Does
    • Enhances libido.
    • Needed to achieve and sustain erections.
    • Protects against heart disease and stroke.
    • Increases and enhances energy and stamina.
    • Builds strong bones.
    • Builds strong muscles.
    • Maintains muscle tone.
  • 19. What Testosterone Does
    • Assists in balance and coordination.
    • Protects against depression.
    • Normalizes weight.
    • Protects against age-related mental decline.
    • Helps maintain a healthy cholesterol balance.
    • May protect against prostate problems and cancer.
  • 20. Andropause
    • Andropause – the male menopause.
    • Testosterone levels decrease.
    • Testosterone deficiency signs and symptoms occur because of a variety of hormone imbalances and not just testosterone deficiency.
      • Estrogen dominance.
    • The onset is usually gradual
      • Signs and symptoms are often missed or treated as separate problems without concern for male hormone status.
  • 21. Andropause Symptoms
    • 1. Low mood, irritability, depression
    • 2. Discouragement, pessimism
    • 3. Loss of energy, strength, stamina
    • 4. Withdrawal from activities and relationships
    • 5. Concentration and memory difficulties
    • 6. Less productive at work, decreased initiative, motivation, drive
    • 7. Gradually increasing fatigue
    • 8. Decrease in spontaneous morning erections
    • 9. Loss of libido
    • 10. Erectile dysfunction (ED)
    • 11. Muscle soreness, weakness, decreased muscle tone
    • 12. Decreased lean muscle mass
    • 13. Sleep problems
    • 14. Blood sugar problems, Insulin Resistance, increased risk for Diabetes
    • 15. Weight gain, central weight gain
    • 16. Increased fat distribution in hips and breasts
    • 17. Increased cholesterol and triglycerides
    • 18. Elevated blood pressure
    • 19. Increased risk for cardiovascular disease
    • 20. Skin problems, thinning and dry skin
    • 21. Prostate problems and urinary problems
    • 22. Osteoporosis
  • 22. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • What happens biochemically:
      • Testosterone gets converted into dihydrotestosterone (DHT).
      • DHT makes the prostate grow.
      • DHT is formed when enzyme is 5-alpha-reductase acts upon testosterone.
      • Goal of medications – to inhibit the production of 5-alpha-reductase.
  • 23. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • More hormone talk:
      • Estradiol (a form of estrogen) stimulates the uptake of DHT.
      • Men with BPH were found to have excessive estradiol in their prostates.
      • Estrogen – fat storing hormone. Chances are if you are overweight, you have excess estrogen.
      • Estrogen stimulates production of enzyme aromatase which turns testosterone into estrogen.
      • So, where does this estrogen come from and what does it mean to prostate health?
  • 24. Where Does the Estrogen Come From?
    • Many sources
      • Food and water
      • Environmental
    • Estrogen is eliminated in the liver.
    • Need a healthy liver, if not may have excess estrogen.
      • Alcohol, unhealthy lifestyles, prescription drugs.
  • 25. Prostate Cancer
    • Most common cancer among men.
    • Second most common cause of cancer death.
    • Chance of development increases:
      • Age
      • African-American or Hispanic
      • Relatives had or have the disease
      • Men receiving testosterone treatments
  • 26. Prostate Cancer
    • Grows very slowly.
    • Make take decades to produce symptoms.
    • Sometimes grows rapidly and spreads outside the prostate.
    • Merck Manual – “The cause of prostate cancer is not known.”
  • 27. What do we know?
    • We (modern medicine) does not know what causes any of these.
    • And, they have common symptoms and some seemingly unrelated symptoms.
    • Such as:
  • 28. Common Symptoms
    • Pain in the penis
    • Pain in the testicles
    • Pain in the perineum (the area between the scrotum and the rectum)
    • Frequent urination
    • Burning urination
    • Night-time urination
  • 29. Common Symptoms
    • Incomplete emptying of the bladder
    • Painful ejaculation
    • Painful urination
    • Sensation of having to urinate immediately, often accompanied by bladder pain or spasm (urgency)
    • Recurring urinary tract infection
  • 30. Seemingly Unrelated Symptoms
    • Lower back pain (very common)
    • Chronic pelvic pain syndrome
    • Fever
    • Chills
    • Joint pain
    • Muscle pain
    • Infection in bloodstream
  • 31. Conventional Treatment: Prostatitis
    • Doctor will prescribe:
      • Antibiotics (when bacteria is found, sometimes when not found)
      • Analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs
    • Doctor will recommend:
      • “Massage”
      • Frequent ejaculation
      • Sitting in a warm bath
  • 32. Conventional Treatment: Prostatitis
    • Do these help?
      • Antibiotic does not address underlying cause(s).
      • The massage does bring some temporary relief, but have you ever had one? (Perhaps there is a better way.)
      • Ejaculation – we’ll hear about that later.
  • 33. Conventional Treatment: Prostatitis
    • If condition becomes chronic, doctor may recommend:
      • Partial or complete removal of prostate
      • Destruction of prostate by microwave or laser treatments
    • Important to treat, or it can lead to infection in the kidneys, testicles, or bladder obstruction.
  • 34. Conventional Treatment: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • Treatment is not necessary unless BPH causing:
      • Urinary tract infections
      • Impaired kidney function
      • Blood in the urine
      • Kidney stones
      • Urinary retention
    • However, if nothing is done, these are likely to occur.
  • 35. Conventional Treatment: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • Drugs
      • Alpha-adrenegic blockers to relax certain muscles to ease the flow of urine.
      • Drugs to reverse the effects of male hormones responsible for the prostate’s growth, “shrinking the prostate and helping delay the need for surgery.”
  • 36. Conventional Treatment: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • Drug (Finasteride) or Proscar.
      • Side effects include erectile dysfunction, decreased libido, and ejaculatory disorders.
      • Also warning for pregnant women not to come in contact with the drug.
    • Drug (Terzosin hydrochloride) or Hytrin.
      • Side effects include low blood pressure, erectile dysfunction, heart palpitations, dizziness, fatigue, and sinus problems.
  • 37. Conventional Treatment: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
    • Surgery – First stage – remove part of prostate
      • Incontinence (1%)
      • Erectile dysfunction (5-10%)
      • Need surgery again in five years (10%)
    • A variety of other techniques to destroy prostate tissue without removal.
  • 38. Conventional Treatment: Prostate Cancer
    • It starts with screening.
    • Blood test to measure the level of prostate specific antigen (PSA), a substance that is “usually elevated in men with prostate cancer.”
    • PSA levels can be misleading.
    • PSA levels normally increase with age.
    • PSA levels can be elevated due to other causes.
  • 39. Conventional Treatment: Prostate Cancer
    • Small, slow-growing, confined to prostate; man expected to live many years – surgery or radiation therapy.
    • Small, slow-growing, confined to prostate; man not expected to live many years – no treatment.
    • Large or fast-growing, confined to prostate – surgery or radiation therapy.
  • 40. Conventional Treatment: Prostate Cancer
    • Cancer spread to areas around prostate, but not to distant areas – radiation therapy.
    • Widespread cancer – hormonal therapy.
  • 41. Conventional Treatment: Prostate Cancer
    • Surgery:
      • Complete incontinence (3%)
      • Partial or stress incontinence (20%)
      • Erectile dysfunction (common)
    • Radiation:
      • Incontinence (5%)
      • Erectile dysfunction (30%)
      • Urethra strictures (7%)
  • 42. Conventional Treatment: Prostate Cancer
    • Hormonal Therapy (drugs to block testosterone which is believed to make cancer grow, yet BHP comes from decreasing testosterone – it can be a little confusing!) side effects:
      • Hot flashes
      • Osteoporosis
      • Low energy
      • Reduced muscle mass
      • Reduced libido
      • Erectile dysfunction
      • Breast enlargement
  • 43. What Have We Learned
    • As men age they are increasingly likely to get one of these ailments.
    • We are not really sure what causes it.
    • There are not a lot of pleasant options once we have it.
    • Perhaps there is another side to the story………(I’ll tell you my story.)
  • 44. Hypothesis
    • Perhaps there is a cause – modern lifestyle.
      • Constant sitting, sedentary lifestyle, limited exercise -> lack of blood flow and circulation
      • Deficient foods -> lack of nutrients to nourish body
      • Emphasis on constant sexual performance -> depletes nutrients
      • Stress, anxiety, and worry ->adds toxins to the blood
      • Prescription drugs -> add toxins to the blood
  • 45. For More Thought
    • Remember the “non-bacterial” prostatitis?
    • It has “no medical remedy”.
    • More news…It is actually bacterial.
      • The bacteria is trapped inside the small sacs (acini) that make up the interior of the gland.
      • When the fluid in these sacs is stagnant or unhealthy, bacteria will grow.
      • The sacs will inflame and swell then seal off. As they do this, the prostate swells.
      • The bacteria does not get outside of the sacs, so it can not be identified in the urine or semen.
  • 46. The Good News
    • Prostate problems come from genetic, hormonal, dietary, and lifestyle factors.
    • We have influence over 3 of the 4!
    • We can do something(s)!!
      • Diet
      • Supplements
      • Specific exercise
      • Relaxation
      • Sexual frequency
  • 47. And Remember…
    • The body is self healing.
    • Healing is done by nature and with fresh healthy blood.
  • 48. Prevention
    • Diet
    • Specific Nutrients
      • Vitamins
      • Minerals
      • Herbs
      • Glandulars
    • Sex Frequency
    • Detoxification
  • 49. Diet
    • A good diet also influences hormones.
    • Good fats vs. Bad fats.
    • Prostatic and seminal lipid (fat) levels and ratios are often abnormal in people with BPH and prostate cancer.
    • Nutrient deficiencies in the gland can create favorable conditions for infections to develop.
  • 50. What causes nutrient deficiencies?
    • Glandular elements depleted by excessive consumption of coffee, alcohol and spicy foods -> lower immunity.
    • Increased sexual activity depletes the prostate gland of enzymes and zinc that sterilize the urethra and protect the gland from infection - > lower immunity.
  • 51. What causes nutrient deficiencies?
    • Diet of bad fats, refined and processed foods, minimal fruits and vegetables -> nutrient deficiencies.
    • Bad fats -> bad cells -> disease.
    • Stress -> hormonal deficiencies.
    • Stress -> weight gain.
    • Sedentary lifestyle -> no movement of blood.
  • 52. Nutrients for the Prostate
    • B 6 – plays an important role in hormonal metabolism.
      • It reduces prolactin levels which reduces the conversion of testosterone into DHT.
      • B Vitamins work together and should be taken together.
    • C, E, Selenium – antioxidants.
    • Essential Fatty Acids (Omega 3 EPA and DHA) – anti-inflammatory, help build and maintain healthy cells.
  • 53. Where do we get these nutrients?
    • B vitamins – whole grains, healthy animal products.
    • Antioxidants – fruits and vegetables.
    • Essential fatty acids – healthy animal products.
    • What don’t you see on this list?
      • Hint: sugar, processed flour, refined foods, alcohol, coffee (get the picture?).
  • 54. Zinc
    • Zinc – a trace mineral
      • Involved in male hormone production, seminal fluid production, and sperm production.
      • Prevents formation of DHT.
    • A normal prostate gland contains more zinc than any other organ in the body.
    • Prostate is the zinc storehouse – where the body may go when it needs zinc.
    • Zinc inhibits estrogen.
    • The ability to absorb zinc declines with age.
  • 55. Zinc
    • Zinc deficiency common today due to depleted soils.
    • Zinc is removed in food processing.
    • Zinc is depleted by smoking, alcohol, coffee, infections, and medications.
    • Zinc sources – brewer’s yeast, eggs, meat, organ meats, seafood (especially oysters), and seeds (particularly pumpkin).
  • 56. Saw Palmetto
    • Saw palmetto ( Serenoa repens )
      • Extract from the berries of this small palm tree has been used for enlarged prostate.
      • Used by Herbalists and Native Americans.
    • What it does
      • Blocks the formation of DHT by inhibiting testosterone 5-alpha reductase.
      • Prevents DHT uptake by prostate cells.
  • 57. Saw Palmetto
    • Benefit comes from the fat and sterol portions of the plant.
    • Double blind study
      • Decreased nighttime urination by 45%.
      • Increased urinary flow rate by 50%.
      • Reduced urine retained in bladder by 42%.
    • Many studies show it is effective for BPH.
    • Warning – there are many types of preparations, not all are potent.
      • Want extract containing 85-95% fatty acids and sterols.
  • 58. Saw Palmetto
    • Additional uses:
      • Discharge and inflammation of the genitourinary tract
      • Atrophy of sexual tissues (male and female)
      • Incontinence (improves bladder tone)
  • 59. Other Herbs
    • Pygeum
      • Powdered bark from the Pygeum africanus tree has been used to treat BPH.
      • It is an anti-inflammatory.
    • Nettle Root
      • Root from Urtica dioica used to treat BPH.
      • Also used for skin eruptions and bowel disorders.
  • 60. Colloidal Silver
    • And how about those pesky bacteria in the prostate sacs?
      • Colloidal silver
  • 61. Glandular Extract
    • Prostate tissue from:
      • Cow (bovine)
      • Pig (porcine)
    • Provides the pattern from which the body can build new healthy cells.
      • Extract seems to be more beneficial than actual organ.
      • Refined raw glandular tissue assumes an enzyme-like action that improves assimilation in the target organ.
  • 62. Sex Frequency
    • Too much/too frequent ejaculation can cause strain and swelling to the prostate.
      • Muscles contract when ejaculate. After ejaculation the muscles will swell.
    • Guidelines of Chinese Medicine:
      • Teenagers – twice per day.
      • 20’s – 5-7 times per week.
      • 30’s – 3-4 times per week.
      • 40’s – 2 times per week.
      • 50’s – 1 time per week.
      • 70’s – 1 time per month.
  • 63. Toxins
    • Cadmium accumulates in the prostate from:
      • Cigarette smoke
      • Paints
      • Contaminated drinking water
      • Shellfish from polluted waters
    • Pesticides used in food or in the home.
    • Air and water pollution.
    • Solution – detoxification.
  • 64. Helping Yourself
    • Improve your diet:
      • Healthy fats
      • Vegetables and fruits
      • Whole grains
    • Utilize supplements
    • Exercise
    • Relax (Meditate)
  • 65. Helping Yourself
    • Goal – increase the blood flow and nerve energy to the surrounding tissues and to the prostate itself.
    • Sitz baths – 30 minutes minimum
    • Massages
      • External
      • Internal
  • 66. How I Can Help
    • Dietary recommendations
    • Supplement recommendations
    • Exercise and relaxation techniques
    • Lifestyle modification recommendations
    • Nutritional testing (hair, saliva, blood)
  • 67. Resources
    • Ann Louise Gittleman: Super Nutrition for Men.
    • www.prostate-massage-and-health.com
    • Bernard Rosen, PhD
      • 262-389-9907
      • [email_address]

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