Great Ideas! The Advantage - Patrick Lencioni
 

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This is a PDF version of a presentation of The Advantage, by Patrick Lencioni, that was delivered as part of the Action Learning for Executives series at Catalyst Connection in Pittsburgh, PA. ...

This is a PDF version of a presentation of The Advantage, by Patrick Lencioni, that was delivered as part of the Action Learning for Executives series at Catalyst Connection in Pittsburgh, PA. Associated worksheets are available for a nominal fee.

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Great Ideas! The Advantage - Patrick Lencioni Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Great ideas! The Advantage Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business by Patrick Lencioni Action Learning for Executives March 28, 2013
  • 2. me? Why should I believe you? Why should I care? What’s in it for
  • 3. Patrick Lencioni is one the best-selling business book authors of all-time “Here is the next business classic. Even the best leaders will read this and wonder, “Why aren’t we doing this already?” Enrique Salem, CEO and President, Symantec
  • 4. For the first time, Lencioni has written a “straight” business book -- rather than a business fable ... and it’s very simple and straightforward
  • 5. There are some things I really liked about The Advantage And some things I didn’t
  • 6. Emphasis on a cohesive leadership team Clarity, clarity, clarity Simplicity And I really like the sub-title
  • 7. Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business
  • 8. A lot of restatement ... ... particularly from The Five Dysfunctions and Death by Meeting Some sections are relatively weak ... ... and dealt with better by others
  • 9. All things considered: this is a very useful book for us right now
  • 10. Especially if you are not that familiar with Patrick Lencioni
  • 11. A brief overview
  • 12. At the core of the book are four disciplines
  • 13. Discipline 1 Build a Cohesive Leadership Team
  • 14. Which basically plays back the key concepts in The Five Dysfunctions of a Team
  • 15. Discipline 2 Create Clarity
  • 16. Focused on answering six key questions
  • 17. Discipline 3 Over-communicate Clarity
  • 18. Focused on meetings and communication
  • 19. Discipline 4 Reinforce Clarity
  • 20. By building it into your people systems
  • 21. There is a chapter on the importance of great meetings
  • 22. And a strong “closing statement”: Seizing the Advantage
  • 23. Now for the deep dive
  • 24. The Case for Organizational Health
  • 25. “The single greatest advantage any company can achieve is organizational health.”
  • 26. “Yet it is ignored by most leaders even though it is simple, free and available to anyone who wants it.”
  • 27. “The health of an organization provides the context for strategy, finance, marketing, technology ...”
  • 28. The Three Biases
  • 29. The Sophistication Bias The Adrenaline Bias The Quantification Bias
  • 30. The Sophistication Bias The Adrenaline Bias The Quantification Bias
  • 31. Smart vs. Healthy
  • 32. Discipline 1 Build a Cohesive Leadership Team
  • 33. Leadership Team A small group, with collective responsibility and common objectives
  • 34. Results Accountability Commitment Conflict Trust
  • 35. Results Accountability Commitment Conflict Building Trust
  • 36. Not a predictive quality, but rather: based on vulnerability, honest and transparency
  • 37. Trust exercises
  • 38. Results Accountability Commitment Mastering Conflict Trust
  • 39. The Ideal Conflict Point Artificial Harmony Destructive Constructive The Conflict Continuum Mean-Spirited Personal Attacks
  • 40. Mining for conflict
  • 41. Results Accountability Achieving Commitment Mastering Conflict Trust
  • 42. Consensus can be the enemy
  • 43. Specific Agreements
  • 44. “At the end of every meeting, cohesive teams must take a few minutes to ensure that everyone is walking away with the same understanding ...
  • 45. ... about what has been agreed to and what they are committed to do.”
  • 46. Results Embracing Accountability Commitment Conflict Trust
  • 47. “To hold someone accountable ...
  • 48. ... is to care about them enough to risk having them blame you for pointing out their deficiencies.”
  • 49. Behaviors vs. Measurables
  • 50. Results Accountability Commitment Conflict Trust
  • 51. Collective Goals One team, one score - Team number one
  • 52. Discipline 2 Create Clarity
  • 53. Creating alignment around six key questions
  • 54. “... creating so much clarity that there is little room for confusion, disorder and infighting”
  • 55. The Six Critical Questions
  • 56. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 57. While Lencioni suggests that “this may be the most important step” ...
  • 58. What is our mission? Who is our customer? What does the customer value? What are our results? What is our plan?
  • 59. For our purposes, I’d like to focus on three questions that complement Drucker’s approach
  • 60. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 61. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 62. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 63. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 64. Think of “Why do we as exist?” as your Core Purpose
  • 65. Sometimes described as More than just making money
  • 66. “How do you contribute to a better world?”
  • 67. Why do we exist categories
  • 68. Your industry
  • 69. A greater cause
  • 70. Your employees
  • 71. Wealth
  • 72. Take your time creating this: it can be messy
  • 73. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 74. Think of “How do we behave?” as your Core Values
  • 75. A few behavioral traits that are inherent in your business
  • 76. Think of great employees and what they embody Consider what an observer would see
  • 77. Core Values vs. Aspirational Values
  • 78. Why do we exist? How do we behave? What do we do? How will we succeed? What is most important, right now? Who must do what?
  • 79. “More than any other question ...
  • 80. ... this one will have the most immediate and tangible impact”
  • 81. In part because it will help overcome Organizational ADD and Silos
  • 82. The Thematic Goal or Rallying Cry
  • 83. Singular Qualitative (?) Temporary
  • 84. Quick Review
  • 85. Discipline 1 Build a Cohesive Leadership Team
  • 86. Discipline 2 Create Clarity
  • 87. Discipline 3 Over-communicate Clarity
  • 88. I found this to be the weakest part of the book
  • 89. “Most leaders are hesitant to repeat themselves.”
  • 90. Don’t confuse the transfer of information with the audience’s ability to understand, internalize and embrace it
  • 91. Cascading Top-down Upward & Lateral
  • 92. Discipline 4 Reinforce Clarity
  • 93. “In order to ensure that the answers to the six critical questions become embedded in the fabric of the company”
  • 94. “In order to ensure that the answers to the six critical questions become embedded in the fabric of the company”
  • 95. “In order to ensure that the answers to the six critical questions become embedded in the fabric of the company”
  • 96. “In order to ensure that the answers to the six critical questions become embedded in the fabric of the company”
  • 97. “Human systems are tools for reinforcing clarity.”
  • 98. The Centrality of Good Meetings
  • 99. I am a big believer in Meeting Rhythms
  • 100. But I’m not sold on Lencioni’s version
  • 101. Daily Admin 5-10 minutes Weekly Tactical 45-90 minutes Ad hoc Strategic Quarterly/ Off-site Developmental 2-4 hours 1-2 days
  • 102. In this regard, I prefer Lencioni the advocate to Lencioni the doctor
  • 103. “No action, activity or process is more central to a healthy organization than the meeting.”
  • 104. “... there is no better way to have a fundamental impact on an organization than by changing the way it does meetings.”
  • 105. So why in the world do we hate meetings?
  • 106. “Probably because they are usually awful.”
  • 107. Seizing the Advantage
  • 108. A more cohesive leadership team
  • 109. Alignment around strategy
  • 110. Better communications
  • 111. Clarity throughout your people systems
  • 112. The Leader’s Sacrifice
  • 113. "At the end of the day, at the end of our careers, when we look back at the many initiatives that we pour ourselves into, few other activities will seem more worthy of our effort and more impactful on the lives of others, than making our organizations healthy."
  • 114. Great ideas! The Advantage Why Organizational Health Trumps Everything Else in Business by Patrick Lencioni Action Learning for Executives March 28, 2013