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Aldine Grades 3-4 Nov 2010

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  • 1. Approach to Information and Communications Technology  Skills, Instructional Unit Design, Aldine ISD, November 8,  2010 Approach to Information and Agenda Communications Technology Skills Instruction Aldine ISD November 8, 2010 Sharing from 9/3 Instructional design Strategies for implementation Grades 3 & 4 Instructional design Sharing Presented by Barbara A. Jansen http://www.slideshare.net/bjansen08 Chair, 1‐12 Instructional Technology and Library Services http://big6tools.pbworks.com/ Upper School Librarian St. Andrew’s School, Austin, TX Big6™ Skills Overview Information Problem The George Washington Carver Museum 1. Task Definition • Each skill has two and Cultural Center in Austin, wants to subskills: expand its Children’s Gallery, Let’s 2. Information Seeking Pretend Dr. Carver!, of famous African- Strategies – The “Little 12” Americans to its online space. Due to 3. Location & Access limited space, only two notables can be included. The Board of Directors will hear 4. Use of Information proposals on who they should consider for “George Washington Carver.” Courtesy of the Tuskegee Institute, Alabama; photograph, P.H. Polk . 5. Synthesis the exhibit. Accessed Britannica Online, 2010. 6. Evaluation Elementary Grouping Big6 #1: Task Definition Big6 1.1 Why group? Why not? 1. Decide how you will group the kids Whole class: Brainstorming 1. How many groups (determined by subtopics) Learn about a notable African American in order to persuade 2. How many students in a group? the Board of Directors of the George Washington Carver 3. Who will be in each group? Museum and Cultural Center to add him or her to the children’s online exhibit. 2. Make a list of: 1. informational (fact-oriented) questions to which each group will need to find “answers” in order to do the project 2. questions that will require higher-level thinking and original ideas Copyright 2010, Barbara A. Jansen. Big6 copyright 1987, Eisenberg & Berkowitz. These materials are copyrighted. They may not be used for profit or presentation or duplicated for any reason. Permission 1 granted for use in K-12 classrooms and libraries only.
  • 2. Approach to Information and Communications Technology  Skills, Instructional Unit Design, Aldine ISD, November 8,  2010 Your questions for the group may look like this: Task Definition 1.2 Look-up questions 1. Separate class into groups according to the person Background they are studying Is your person known by any other name? When and where was your person born? When did your person die or is he or she still alive? What information can you find about his or her family life? 2. Students brainstorm the information they need to What hardships did your person overcome while growing up? find “answers” in order to do the project How was your person educated? What other things were interesting in your person’s childhood? Adulthood 3. Your list What important jobs did your person have as an adult? What are important events that occurred in your person’s adult life, such as hardships, turning points, successes, accomplishments? 4. Data chart or other note taking organizer for step #4 What important contributions did your person make to our state or country? Use of Information Who were/are the influential people in your person’s life? What other things were interesting or important in your person’s adulthood? 5. Higher-level questions: Think-about questions additional page with space to record their responses. Why was your person a positive role model (someone others can look up to or model their life after)? How did your person influence or impact our lives today? Question prompts Different format Big6 #2: Information Seeking Strategies Prepare note taking organizer Licensed from CartoonBank.com, 2008. Student’s Name Topic Back to L&A Back to TNT Elementary web evaluation Find Resources in Subscription Databases Who wrote the pages and are they an expert in the field? What is the purpose of the site? Where does the information come Why? from? TexShare databases When was the site created, updated, or last worked on? Others Aldine purchases Why is the information valuable? for elementary Diane Lauer, 1999. Used with permission. Copyright 2010, Barbara A. Jansen. Big6 copyright 1987, Eisenberg & Berkowitz. These materials are copyrighted. They may not be used for profit or presentation or duplicated for any reason. Permission 2 granted for use in K-12 classrooms and libraries only.
  • 3. Approach to Information and Communications Technology  Skills, Instructional Unit Design, Aldine ISD, November 8,  2010 Big6 #3: Location & Access Big6 #4: Use of Information 3.1 Locate sources 4.1 Read, engage, hear, view, etc. Traditional and electronic location skills 3.2 Access information within sources 4.2 Take out needed information Table of contents, index, searching within databases etc. Citation Machine Reading for information Keyword and related word identification Types of Note Taking Treasure Map Analogy  Citation Summary Paraphrase Quotation Stripling, Barbara K. and Pitts, Judy M. Brainstorms and Blueprints: Teaching Library Research as a Thinking Process. Englewood, CO: Libraries Unlimited, 1988, p. 116. Used with permission. Trash‐n‐treasure note taking Big6 #5: Synthesis Commons attribution license. Flickr.com. Photo credit: Old Shoe Woman. Creative “The notion that young people would critically and creatively process the information they find is perhaps the core of the information search process.” —Loertscher & Woolls, 1999. Copyright 2010, Barbara A. Jansen. Big6 copyright 1987, Eisenberg & Berkowitz. These materials are copyrighted. They may not be used for profit or presentation or duplicated for any reason. Permission 3 granted for use in K-12 classrooms and libraries only.
  • 4. Approach to Information and Communications Technology  Skills, Instructional Unit Design, Aldine ISD, November 8,  2010 Final product should… Cautionary Statement of the Day Transferable Skills Image licensed from Cartoonbank.com, 2008. Photo credit: diadrius. Creative Commons attribution license. Flickr.com. Composition TAKS Skills 1. Literary forms: Story, poem, myth, fable, tall tale, limerick, or play about his or her notable Facts about their topic (included African American including… each time); 2. Information from knowledge level questions Cause and effect relationships; 3. Thoughtful responses to Problem and solution; higher-level questions Compare and contrast; 4. Turn in all notes Characters’ opinions; and drafts Logical sequence; Generalizations; and Logical conclusions. Copyright 2010, Barbara A. Jansen. Big6 copyright 1987, Eisenberg & Berkowitz. These materials are copyrighted. They may not be used for profit or presentation or duplicated for any reason. Permission 4 granted for use in K-12 classrooms and libraries only.
  • 5. Approach to Information and Communications Technology  Skills, Instructional Unit Design, Aldine ISD, November 8,  2010 Breaking News… Big6 #6: Evaluation Quote credit: Costa & Kallick (1992, p. 280) If Minds Matter. Photo credit: Pete Prodoehl. Creative Commons attribution license. Flickr.com. “Education is what survives when what has been learned has been forgotten.” -B. F. Skinner bjansen@sasaustin.org library.sasaustin.org slideshare.net/bjansen08 Copyright 2010, Barbara A. Jansen. Big6 copyright 1987, Eisenberg & Berkowitz. These materials are copyrighted. They may not be used for profit or presentation or duplicated for any reason. Permission 5 granted for use in K-12 classrooms and libraries only.